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For Rs10 a film, India’s Underclass in Delhi gets their daily dose of Bollywood

Under the bridge blankets are hung to create walls to block out sunlight. Homemade tickets are used, and seats can be chosen based on where you want to view the movie

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After a hard day's work. Image source: (Reuters/Cathal McNaughton)
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  • Under the bridge, underclass people hang blankets to create walls for the theatre and to block out sunlight
  • Tickets here are sold for Rs 10 ($0.15) per movie
  • An old television set is placed in the front, and the crowds settle in

In many cultures movies are a way to escape from reality. They can showcase hardship and victory, the supernatural or death. Whatever it is, the viewer becomes engrossed in the film. They start feeling for the characters, and rooting for them to win; forgetting about their own life struggles in that moment of time. With the inflation of movie ticket prices, it becomes harder and harder for everyone to find the escape a movie provides; this is the case for India’s underclass.

Homemade tickets lie on a table at the makeshift cinema. Image source: (Reuters/Cathal McNaughton)
Homemade tickets lie on a table at the makeshift cinema. Image source: (Reuters/Cathal McNaughton)

For those who can barely make ends meet, a movie ticket sold at Rs400 ($5.95) is a luxury they must forgo. Cue the pop up of makeshift theaters. One example of this new type of theater can be found under a 140 year old bridge. Located in the old quarters of New Delhi, the theater attracts many people who have spent their day working hard. Tickets here are sold for the lower sum of Rs10 ($0.15).

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A passenger train makes its way over the bridge that houses the makeshift cinema. Image source: (Reuters/Cathal McNaughton)
A passenger train makes its way over the bridge that houses the makeshift cinema. Image source: (Reuters/Cathal McNaughton)

Under the bridge blankets are hung to create walls to block out sunlight. Homemade tickets are used, and seats can be chosen based on where you want to view the movie; just like the real theaters. An old television set is placed in the front, and the crowds settle in. After a long day of work this seems like the ideal place to unwind. Some of the crowd can not help but dose off into a restful sleep, while others can not take their eyes off of the screen.

Patrons can sit or even lie down while watching movies.Image source: (Reuters/Cathal McNaughton)
Patrons can sit or even lie down while watching movies.Image source: (Reuters/Cathal McNaughton)

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One member of the crowd, Mohammad Noor Islam spoke to Reuters Television. It is not hard to agree with him as he was quoted saying, “Films are much better. Many men get hooked on gambling, drugs and alcohol and they pass their time by drinking or smoking.”

One-man show. Image source: (Reuters/Cathal McNaughton)
One-man show. Image source: (Reuters/Cathal McNaughton)

Under the bridge is a safe haven. The laborers can find relief from the scorching heat, and distractions from their daily lives. At the low price of Rs 10, a one hundredth of the cost of an actual theatre ticket, movies are watched and enjoyed by many.

-by Abigail Andrea, an intern at NewsGram. Twitter @abby_kono

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Survey Shows That More Women Support Live-in Relationships in India

For long the concept and topic of live-in relationships has been taboo in India but the times are changing with a number of women coming out in its support, according to a survey.

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Hindu marriage. Pixabay

For long the concept and topic of live-in relationships has been taboo in India but the times are changing with a number of women coming out in its support, according to a survey.

Inshorts, a news app, conducted a poll in the second week of May capturing the views of 1.4 lakh netizens — 80 per cent being in the age group of 18-35 years, read a statement.

Women
representational image. pixabay

According to the survey, more than 80 per cent millennials think that live-in relationships are still considered a taboo in Indian society while more than 47 per cent Indians are of the opinion that marriage is better when choosing between marriage and lifelong live-ins.

More than 80 per cent Indians said that they do support live-ins as a way of life. Out of these, 26 per cent millennials went a step ahead and said that they would choose lifelong live-ins as an option over marriages.

On the other hand, 86 per cent Indians are of the opinion that lust is not the sole reason behind live-ins and more than 45 per cent say that it is more of compatibility testing before marriage.

Night-owl women not for long-term relationships: Study
Couple. pixabay

In the report, 45 per cent respondents have also said that since Indian society constantly judges unmarried couples staying together, any move by the judiciary to support this will not have any effect on their mindset.

Also Read: Night-owl women not for long-term relationships: Study

Azhar Iqubal, CEO and Co-founder, Inshorts said: “Live-in relationships, even after being legally recognised by the government, is a forbidden subject of discussion in Indian households. Our current survey was focused on capturing the sentiments of our Indian youth on such delicate issues.” (IANS)