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Former Maryland governor Martin O’Malley enters US presidential race

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Washington: Former Maryland governor Martin O’Malley on Saturday announced his bid for the 2016 US presidential race, in which he will first face tough challenge from former secretary of state Hillary Clinton to win the Democratic nomination.

“I declare that I am a candidate for president of the US,” O’Malley told a crowd of supporters at the Federal Hill Park in Baltimore, where he served as mayor before becoming Maryland’s governor for 2007-2015, Xinhua reported.

“My decision is made. Now you will all have a vital choice to make next year, for the good of your families, and for the good of the country you love and carry in your hearts,” he said.

O’Malley, 52, joined Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton in the Democratic field to compete for the party nomination next year.

Clinton is being regarded as the frontrunner, but O’Malley said Democrats deserve a choice in the 2016 primary.

In a veiled attack at Clinton, O’Malley said the US presidency “is not a crown to be passed back and forth … between two royal families”, referring to the Clinton and Bush families.

Hillary Clinton’s husband Bill Clinton occupied the White House for two terms during 1993-2001.

Former Florida governor Jeb Bush, brother of former president George W. Bush (2001-2009) and son of former president George H.W. Bush (1989-1993), is expected to soon announce his bid for the 2016 Republican nomination.

Jeb Bush is regarded as the top contender among an already crowded Republican field, which currently includes eight candidates after former New York governor George Pataki announced on Thursday his run for the 2016 race. (IANS)

 

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U.S. Library of Congress will not collect every tweet on twitter

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FILE - The Twitter app is seen on a mobile phone in Philadelphia, April 26, 2017
U.S. Library of Congress will not collect every tweet on twitter. VOA

US, Dec 31, 2017: The U.S. Library of Congress says it will no longer collect every single tweet published on Twitter as it has been doing for the past 12 years.

The library said this week that it can no longer collect everything across the entire social media platform because of recent changes Twitter has made, including allowing longer tweets, photos and videos.

It said in a blog post this week that its first objective with collecting and archiving tweets was “to document the emergence of online social media for future generations.” The library says it has fulfilled that objective and no longer needs to be a “comprehensive” collector of tweets.

FILE - In this Dec. 19, 2013 file photo, the Library of Congress is seen in Washington.
FILE – In this Dec. 19, 2013 file photo, the Library of Congress is seen in Washington. VOA

The Library of Congress said it will still collect and archive tweets in the future, but will do so on a more selective basis. It said going forward “the tweets collected and archived will be thematic and event-based, including events such as elections, or themes of ongoing national interest, e.g. public policy.”

The library said it generally does not collect media comprehensively, but said it made an exception for public tweets when the social media platform was first developed.

The library said it will keep its previous archive of tweets from 2006-2017 to help people understand the rise of social media and to offer insight into the public mood during that time. “Throughout its history, the Library has seized opportunities to collect snapshots of unique moments in human history and preserve them for future generations,” it said.

“The Twitter Archive may prove to be one of this generation’s most significant legacies to future generations. Future generations will learn much about this rich period in our history, the information flows, and social and political forces that help define the current generation,” it said. (VOA)

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