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Framing thunder: Scientists capture first ever image of boisterous bang radiating from a lightning strike

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

Lightning, usually brings out scary images within the mind, thoughts of nature’s wrath being vented on the Earth. At the same time, lightning has been the object of the photographer’s affection, the beauty of its arc seducing their lusty lenses to capture the detail of the phenomenon.

Now, to take matters further, scientists have captured a picture of the sound that goes along with it, in what is touted as the first ever detailed image of thunder.

The image was captured by sending a copper wire into a cloud to make it send down thunder and lightning by Maher Dayeh, a heliophysicist from the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio.

The event was recorded with 15 microphones that were laid out 95 meters from the lightning, which together helped capture the sound waves.

The images, which are made up of acoustic maps, are captured using a special equipment that can visualize the way that the sound moves in space.

Through the capturing of sound, scientists hope to gain a better understanding of the physics behind the natural strike.

Image: UNIV. OF FLORIDA, FLORIDA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, SRI
Image:SRI

Lightning is created by electrical charges move either within a cloud or between the cloud and the ground. It causes sudden increase in pressure and temperature which produces sudden expansion of the surrounding air, which in turn results in a sonic shock wave called thunder.

Video of starting lightning with rockets

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Treating insomnia in young people can ease mental health problems like Anxiety, Depression: Study

The study is published in The Lancet Psychiatry journal

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A study published Wednesday found that treating insomnia in young people could ease mental health problems such as anxiety and depression
A study published Wednesday found that treating insomnia in young people could ease mental health problems such as anxiety and depression. VOA

London, USA, September 7, 2017: Treating young people who suffer from insomnia by using online cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) could reduce debilitating mental health problems such as anxiety and depression, scientists said Wednesday.

In a large trial published in The Lancet Psychiatry journal, researchers at Oxford University’s Sleep and Circadian Neuroscience Institute also found that successfully treating sleep disruption eased psychotic symptoms such as hallucinations and paranoia.

“Sleep problems are very common in people with mental health disorders, but for too long insomnia has been trivialized as merely a symptom, rather than a cause, of psychological difficulties,” said Daniel Freeman, a professor of clinical psychology who led the work.

“This study turns that old idea on its head, showing that insomnia may actually be a contributory cause of mental health problems.”

The research involved 3,755 university students from across Britain who were randomized into two groups. One group had six sessions of online CBT, each lasting about 20 minutes, and delivered via a digital program called Sleepio. The others had access to standard treatments but no CBT.

Freeman’s team monitored participants’ mental health with a series of online questionnaires at zero, three, 10 and 22 weeks from the start of treatment.

The researchers found that those who had the CBT sleep treatment reduced their insomnia significantly as well as showing small but sustained reductions in paranoia and hallucinatory experiences.

The CBT also led to improvements in depression, anxiety, nightmares, psychological well-being, and daytime work and home functioning.

Andrew Welchman, head of neuroscience and mental health at the Wellcome Trust health charity, which helped fund the research, said the results suggested improving sleep may provide a promising route into early treatment to improve mental health.

Freeman added: “A good night’s sleep really can make a difference to people’s psychological health. Helping people get better sleep could be an important first step in tackling many psychological problems and emotional problems.” (VOA)