Tuesday September 24, 2019
Home Science & Technology Framing thund...

Framing thunder: Scientists capture first ever image of boisterous bang radiating from a lightning strike

0
//

By NewsGram Staff Writer

Lightning, usually brings out scary images within the mind, thoughts of nature’s wrath being vented on the Earth. At the same time, lightning has been the object of the photographer’s affection, the beauty of its arc seducing their lusty lenses to capture the detail of the phenomenon.

Now, to take matters further, scientists have captured a picture of the sound that goes along with it, in what is touted as the first ever detailed image of thunder.

The image was captured by sending a copper wire into a cloud to make it send down thunder and lightning by Maher Dayeh, a heliophysicist from the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio.

The event was recorded with 15 microphones that were laid out 95 meters from the lightning, which together helped capture the sound waves.

The images, which are made up of acoustic maps, are captured using a special equipment that can visualize the way that the sound moves in space.

Through the capturing of sound, scientists hope to gain a better understanding of the physics behind the natural strike.

Image: UNIV. OF FLORIDA, FLORIDA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, SRI
Image:SRI

Lightning is created by electrical charges move either within a cloud or between the cloud and the ground. It causes sudden increase in pressure and temperature which produces sudden expansion of the surrounding air, which in turn results in a sonic shock wave called thunder.

Video of starting lightning with rockets

Next Story

Scientists Reform Face Of Another Human Ancestor

Now, Scientists have come up with a reformed face of a human ancestor

0
human, ancestor, scientists, sculpture
This image shows a preliminary portrait of a juvenile female Denisovan based on a skeletal profile reconstructed from ancient DNA methylation maps. IANS

Exactly what our Denisovan relatives who lived 100,000 years ago might have looked like had been anyone’s guess for a simple reason – the entire collection of Denisovan remains includes a pinky bone, three teeth, and a lower jaw. Now, Scientists have come up with a reformed face of a human ancestor.

Now they have got a face. Using genetic data, scientists have now produced reconstructions of these long-lost relatives.

“We provide the first reconstruction of the skeletal anatomy of Denisovans,” said study author Liran Carmel of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in Israel.

“In many ways, Denisovans resembled Neanderthals, but in some traits, they resembled us, and in others they were unique,” Carmel said.

Overall, the researchers identified 56 anatomical features in which Denisovans differed from modern humans and/or Neanderthals, 34 of them in the skull, according to a report published in the journal Cell.

For example, the Denisovan’s skull was probably wider than that of modern humans or Neanderthals. They likely also had a longer dental arch.

Rather than relying on DNA sequences, the researchers extracted anatomical information from gene activity patterns.

human, ancestor, scientists, sculpture
Using genetic data, scientists have now produced reconstructions of these long-lost relatives.
IANS

Those gene activity patterns were inferred based on genome-wide DNA methylation or epigenetic patterns.

To test the method the researchers developed, they first applied it to two species whose anatomy is known: the Neanderthal and the chimpanzee.

They found that roughly 85 per cent of the trait reconstructions were accurate in predicting which traits diverged and in which direction they diverged.

By focusing on consensus predictions and the direction of the change, rather than trying to predict precise measurements, they were able to produce the first reconstructed anatomical profile of the little-understood Denisovan.

ALSO READ: Here’s How A Wearable Device Can Regrow Hair On Bald Head

The evidence suggests that Denisovans likely shared Neanderthal traits such as an elongated face and a wide pelvis.

It also highlighted Denisovan-specific differences, such as an increased dental arch and lateral cranial expansion, the researchers said.

“Studying Denisovan anatomy can teach us about human adaptation, evolutionary constraints, development, gene-environment interactions, and disease dynamics,” Carmel said. (IANS)