Thursday November 15, 2018
Home World France could ...

France could face chemical, biological attacks from terror groups: French PM

0
//
Republish
Reprint

Paris: French Prime Minister Manuel Valls on Thursday warned that France could face chemical or biological attack from terror groups.

Valls made these remarks during a debate by the Members of Parliament (MPs) on whether or not to extend the state of emergency after the Paris attacks.

Meanwhile, police used more than 5,000 rounds of ammunition on the building in Wednesday’s raid to catch Belgian national Abdelhamid Abaaoud, suspected to be the mastermind of Paris terror attacks, media reported.

Jean-Michel Fauverge, director of the Recherche Assistance Intervention Dissuasion (Raid) anti-terrorism force, told Le Figaro that officers believed there was one woman and two militants, armed with Kalashnikovs and suicide vests, inside the flat, reported The Telegraph.

Over 110 officers were involved in the police operation that lasted for over seven hours. They knew there was a possibility that Abaaoud was present in the flat. However, the fate of Abaaoud in still unclear.

Police used explosives to blast open the door, but it failed to take the occupants off guard and officers were caught in a gunfight. They used cameras on poles to survey the apartment through holes in the ceiling of the flat below.

The Telegraph reported that the police used more than 5,000 rounds of ammunition during the siege.

At least two people were killed in the raid – a woman who blew herself up with a suicide vest and another body that was found riddled with bullets – according to Paris prosecutor Francois Molins.

(With inputs from agencies)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2015 NewsGram

Next Story

Facebook Allows French Regulars To Oversee Hate Speech Control

France's use of embedded regulators is modeled on what happens in its banking and nuclear industries.

0
Facebook
A Facebook panel is seen during the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity, in Cannes, France. VOA

Facebook will allow French regulators to “embed” inside the company to examine how it combats online hate speech, the first time the wary tech giant has opened its doors in such a way, President Emmanuel Macron said Monday.

From January, Macron’s administration will send a small team of senior civil servants to the company for six months to verify Facebook’s goodwill and determine whether its checks on racist, sexist or hate-fueled speech could be improved.

“It’s a first,” Macron told the annual Internet Governance Forum in Paris. “I’m delighted by this very innovative experimental approach,” he said. “It’s an experiment, but a very important first step in my view.”

The trial project is an example of what Macron has called “smart regulation,” something he wants to extend to other tech leaders such as Google, Apple and Amazon.

Facebook
Facebook’s founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg meets with French President Emmanuel Macron at the Elysee Palace after the “Tech for Good” summit, in Paris, France. VOA

The move follows a meeting with Facebook’s founder Mark Zuckerberg in May, when Macron invited the CEOs of some of the biggest tech firms to Paris, telling them they should work for the common good.

The officials may be seconded from the telecoms regulator and the interior and justice ministries, a government source said. Facebook said the selection was up to the French presidency.

It is unclear whether the group will have access to highly-sensitive material such as Facebook’s algorithms or codes to remove hate speech. It could travel to Facebook’s European headquarters in Dublin and global base in Menlo Park, California, if necessary, the company said.

facebook, U.S. Politicals ads, dating
This photo shows a Facebook app icon on a smartphone in New York. VOA

“The best way to ensure that any regulation is smart and works for people is by governments, regulators and businesses working together to learn from each other and explore ideas,” Nick Clegg, the former British deputy prime minister who is now head of Facebook’s global affairs, said in a statement.

France’s approach to hate speech has contrasted sharply with Germany, Europe’s leading advocate of privacy.

Also Read: Online Hate Thriving Even After The Recent Hate Crime in The U.S.

Since January, Berlin has required sites to remove banned content within 24 hours or face fines of up to 50 million euros ($56 million). That has led to accusations of censorship.

France’s use of embedded regulators is modeled on what happens in its banking and nuclear industries.

“[Tech companies] now have the choice between something that is smart but intrusive and regulation that is wicked and plain stupid,” a French official said. (VOA)