Monday December 17, 2018

From Debonair to Outlook: Frank and fearless editor Vinod Mehta leaves a legacy behind

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By Ishan Kukreti

Delhi woke up to a lazy, hazily lit Sunday morning, on 8th March,2015, unaware that a man who had driven the imagination of many, mentored many, would not be there for them anymore.

Vinod Mehta, one of the foremost journalists of the country, without whom, names like the Sunday Observer, Indian Post, The Independent, The Pioneer and the beloved Outlook would not be there, took a permanent retirement from the world. His presence is sure to be missed by many.

Vinod`s career was full of crests and troughs.  Starting with Debonair, his career took a leap from irrelevant to the relevant with the launch of Sunday Observer, 1981 and later the Outlook, 1995.

He is best known as the editor-in-chief of Outlook and his editorial decisions there shaped not just the image of the magazine as a forerunner of objective, truthful journalism but also his reputation as a no-nonsense seeker and portrayer of truth. His decision to run a story on the infamous Radia Tapes, though cost him his position at the magazine`s editorial department, exposed a fundamental rot in the information industry, that needed to be brought out in open and introspected about.

Vinod was a down to earth practical man, who knew his abilities and his place in the world. Everyone who ever worked with him would vouch for his openness to ideas and suggestions, his reputation as a lousy paymaster and a magnanimous human.

The reason India will miss Vinod Mehta is because he was the storyteller to an entire generation. Like a grandma to a kid, he whispered mysteries into the minds of people through his columns and they all will miss him very much.

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Bug Spotted in Microsoft Office 365, Outlook

Several tech companies offer bug bounty incentives. Sahad also received bug bounty from Facebook last year for discovering a bug in the social networking platform

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Microsoft
Kaizala app helping 1,000 Indian firms boost workplace productivity: Microsoft. Pixabay

A Kerala-based application security engineer has won bug bounty from Microsoft for discovering a series of vulnerabilities that left over 400 million Microsoft users’ accounts — from Office 365 to Outlook emails — open to hacking.

Sahad NK, who works as a security researcher with cybersecurity portal Safetydetective.com, came across multiple vulnerabilities that, when chained together, allow an attacker to take over any Microsoft Outlook, Microsoft Store, or Microsoft Sway account simply via the victim clicking on a link.

“Immediately after finding these vulnerabilities, we contacted Microsoft via their responsible disclosure programme and started working with them,” said Safetydetective on Tuesday.

The vulnerabilities were reported to Microsoft in June and fixed by November end.

“While the vulnerability proof of concept was only made for Microsoft Outlook and Microsoft Sway, we expect it to affect all Microsoft accounts including Microsoft Store,” said Sahad.

Microsoft, PUBG
A sign for Microsoft is seen on a building in Cambridge. VOA

Sahad discovered that a Microsoft subdomain, “success.office.com”, had not been properly configured. He also found bug in Microsoft Office, Store and Sway products.

A string of bugs when chained together created the perfect attack to gain access to someone’s Microsoft account — simply by tricking a user into clicking a link.

“Anyone’s Office account, even enterprise and corporate accounts, including their email, documents and other files, could have been easily accessed by a malicious attacker, and it would have been near-impossible to discern from a legitimate user,” said TechCrunch.

Also Read- New Bug Forces Alphabet to Expedite Google+ API Shutdown

Sahad, with the help of fellow security researcher Paulos Yibelo, reported the bug to Microsoft, which fixed the vulnerability and gave an unspecified amount as bug bounty to Sahad.

Several tech companies offer bug bounty incentives. Sahad also received bug bounty from Facebook last year for discovering a bug in the social networking platform. (IANS)