Monday June 24, 2019

From Debonair to Outlook: Frank and fearless editor Vinod Mehta leaves a legacy behind

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By Ishan Kukreti

Delhi woke up to a lazy, hazily lit Sunday morning, on 8th March,2015, unaware that a man who had driven the imagination of many, mentored many, would not be there for them anymore.

Vinod Mehta, one of the foremost journalists of the country, without whom, names like the Sunday Observer, Indian Post, The Independent, The Pioneer and the beloved Outlook would not be there, took a permanent retirement from the world. His presence is sure to be missed by many.

Vinod`s career was full of crests and troughs.  Starting with Debonair, his career took a leap from irrelevant to the relevant with the launch of Sunday Observer, 1981 and later the Outlook, 1995.

He is best known as the editor-in-chief of Outlook and his editorial decisions there shaped not just the image of the magazine as a forerunner of objective, truthful journalism but also his reputation as a no-nonsense seeker and portrayer of truth. His decision to run a story on the infamous Radia Tapes, though cost him his position at the magazine`s editorial department, exposed a fundamental rot in the information industry, that needed to be brought out in open and introspected about.

Vinod was a down to earth practical man, who knew his abilities and his place in the world. Everyone who ever worked with him would vouch for his openness to ideas and suggestions, his reputation as a lousy paymaster and a magnanimous human.

The reason India will miss Vinod Mehta is because he was the storyteller to an entire generation. Like a grandma to a kid, he whispered mysteries into the minds of people through his columns and they all will miss him very much.

Next Story

Microsoft Informs Outlook Users of Hack

As of now, it remains undisclosed exactly how many users were affected by the breach

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Microsoft's building.
The office building of Microsoft. Pixabay

Coming to terms with a hacking and data breach case, Microsoft is reaching out to some users informing them of an Outlook.com hack which exposed data sent over emails to hackers who kept accessing their accounts between January 1 to March 28.

Founded in 1996, Outlook.com is a web-based suite of webmail, contacts, tasks, and calendaring services developed and offered by Microsoft.

In an email being sent to affected users, Microsoft claims that apart from the content of the emails including attachments, the hackers could have possibly viewed account email addresses, folder names and subject lines of the mails sent and received, The Verge reported on Saturday.

“Our data indicates that account-related information (but not the content of any e-mails) could have been viewed, but Microsoft has no indication why that information was viewed or how it may have been used,” the report quoted the company as saying in its email.

The case came into notice when the software giant discovered that credentials of a support agent were compromised for its web mail service which led to unauthorised access into some accounts.

Microsoft, Taiwan AI
A man walks past a Microsoft sign set up for the Microsoft BUILD conference at Moscone Center in San Francisco, April 28, 2015. VOA

“We addressed this scheme, which affected a limited subset of consumer accounts, by disabling the compromised credentials and blocking the perpetrators’ access,” the report quoted a Microsoft spokesperson as saying.

Even though the software giant ensures that no login details or other personal information were stolen by the hackers, the company is recommending that affected users reset their passwords.

“Please be assured that Microsoft takes data protection very seriously and has engaged its internal security and privacy teams in the investigation and resolution of the issue, as well as additional hardening of systems and processes to prevent such recurrence,” the email adds.

Also Read- Tech Giant Google Sharing Data With US Forces Raises Concerns

As of now, it remains undisclosed exactly how many users were affected by the breach.

This security incident comes weeks after a former security researcher pled guilty to hacking into Microsoft and Nintendo servers for a number of weeks in January 2017, allowing European hackers to access pre-release versions of Windows. (IANS)