Monday August 20, 2018
Home Indian Diaspora Fund raising ...

Fund raising fair in Britain by Sikh Diasporas

0
//
86
credit: www.examiner.co.uk
Republish
Reprint

By NewsGram Staff-Writer

credit: www.allevents.in
credit: www.allevents.in

The Sikh community in Britain organised a fund raising fair for a memorial statue which commenced on Sunday.

The sixth anniversary of the annual fair named ‘Sikh Mela’ was arranged at Yorkshire Lions’s Warrenside base in Deighton area in Huddersfield. The memorial statue will be an epitome of dedication to thousands of Sikhs who lost their lives fighting for British Empire in the two World Wars.

The alcohol free event included various activities, like turban tying contest, sword fighting, strongman contest and specially an American SWAT team demonstration which showed how SWAT makes arrest. Community members along with several Huddersfield army veterans honoured the Sikh soldiers died during the wars.

Live music was also arranged by Sikh artists, featuring Birmingham based punjabi singer Sukshinder Shinda. Among other traditional games for children was a show called ‘bird of prey’ which stole attention among most. Tug of war and Thai boxing competition were also organised.

credit: www.examiner.co.uk
credit: www.examiner.co.uk

Despite having a shaky start due to rain, the event was thoroughly enjoyed by the members from the community and the visitors. The day also allowed people from different faiths to know and learn about Sikh religion and become aware about important milestones.

 

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2015 NewsGram

Next Story

Archaeological Sites Dating Back Thousands of Years Found Around Britain, Thanks to the Heat

The archaeologists are mapping the sites to determine the significance of the remains beneath and how best to protect them.

0
A view shows parched grass from the lack of rain in Greenwich Park, backdropped by the Royal Museums Greenwich and the skyscrapers of the Canary Wharf business district, during what has been the driest summer for many years in London
A view shows parched grass from the lack of rain in Greenwich Park, backdropped by the Royal Museums Greenwich and the skyscrapers of the Canary Wharf business district, during what has been the driest summer for many years in London. VOA

Britain’s hottest summer in decades has revealed cropmarks across the country showing the archaeological sites of Iron Age settlements, Roman farms and even Neolithic monuments dating back thousands of years, archaeologists said Wednesday.

Cropmarks — patterns of shading in crops and grass seen most clearly from the air — form faster in hot weather as the fields dry out, making this summer’s heat wave ideal for discovering such sites.

Archaeologists at the public body Historic England have been making the most of the hot weather to look for patterns revealing the ancient sites buried below, from Yorkshire in the north down to Cornwall in the southwest.

Archeology , Neolithic artefacts. england
Neolithic remains (representational image). Wikimedia

“We’ve discovered hundreds of new sites this year spanning about 6,000 years of England’s history,” said Damian Grady, aerial reconnaissance manager at Historic England.

“Each new site is interesting in itself, but the fact we’re finding so many sites over such a large area is filling in a lot of gaps in knowledge about how people lived and farmed and managed the landscape in the past,” he said.

Also Read: Britain Fully Committed to Ensuring Iran Nuclear Deal

The archaeologists are mapping the sites to determine the significance of the remains beneath and how best to protect them. While some may be significant enough to merit national protection from development, local authorities or farmers may be left to decide what to do at other sites.

“We’ll hopefully get the help of farmers to help protect some of these undesignated sites,” Grady said. (VOA)

Next Story