Wednesday October 24, 2018

Genetic differences lead to failure of anti-HIV drug

0
//
49
Republish
Reprint

Washington, Genetic variations and not complying with treatment regimens may account for some failures of an anti-HIV drug to treat and prevent the infection.

335238FA-F319-41E1-A55AB94B28EB1600The drug Tenofovir, marketed as Viread, is processed differently according to cell locations, the study said.

This is to see if the drug is eventually marketed as a topical gel, it can work differently depending on whether it is applied to the vagina or the rectum.

“Our results suggest that in future, before prescribing tenofovir to a patient, a doctor could order genetic testing and know in advance if it works, and prescribe a different drug if it won’t,” said Namandje Bumpus, associate professor of medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

In the study described in the journal EBio-Medicine, the team focused on a search for the human enzymes that convert tenofovir from its original form to an activated one that combats HIV.

The team “knocked out” genes for phosphate-adding enzymes one by one, then exposed the tissues’ cells to tenofovir.

They found that the enzyme called pyruvate kinase was different from that which performed the second activation step in the colorectal tissues.

The team sequenced the genes of 142 women who had participated in a clinical trial of tenofovir to look for genetic variations that might have affected the function of the enzyme.

They found 71 such variants, several of which a computer model predicted would make the enzyme ineffective.

Altogether, eight percent of the women had genetic variants that were likely to make them unable to convert tenofovir to its activated form.

“Tenofovir has been shown in trials to be very effective, so when it does not work, researchers and clinicians tend to assume the individual just was not taking the drug as directed,” Bumpus said.

(IANS)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2015 NewsGram

Next Story

Individual Types of HPV Linked to HIV Infection

Previous study with female sex workers showed that the HPV vaccine still provided protection to high-risk groups

0
HIV
Nearly 40 individual HPV types linked to HIV infection. Pixabay

Scientists have for the first time identified 37 individual types of the human papillomavirus, or HPV, that are specifically linked to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection.

The findings showed that a person with any HPV type, more than one HPV type, or high-risk HPV are more likely to test positive for HIV.

“Although most studies have shown a general link between HPV and HIV co-infection, our findings illustrate the strong relationship between individual HPV types and HIV infection,” said lead author Brandon Brown, Associate Professor at the University of California, Riverside.

“Some HPV types are more linked to cancer and others to warts. This further illustrates the potential utility of HPV vaccine for men who have sex with men and trans women, not only for HPV prevention but also possibly for HIV prevention,” Brown added.

Brown explained that previous research has shown that HPV, in general, was linked to HIV infection, but his research team looked at infection with 37 HPV types and found that individual types are linked, “which is more specific than saying HPV is linked”.

The study, published in the journal PLOS ONE, identified HPV types such as HPV16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 52, 58, linked to HIV.

For the study, the team investigated nearly 600 men who have sex with men, or MSM, and transgender women in Lima, Peru.

HIV
School girls light candles in the shape of a ribbon during a HIV/AIDS awareness campaign ahead of World Aids Day, in Ahmedabad, India, Nov. 30, 2016. (VOA)

Brown and his colleagues started with two groups, one with genital warts and one without, and followed participants over two years to see who contracted HIV.

Of the 571 participants who completed at least two study visits, 73 acquired HIV in two years — a 6 per cent HIV incidence rate.

Previous study with female sex workers showed that the HPV vaccine still provided protection to high-risk groups.

You may Also Like to Read About- Tesla Launches A New Programme That Lets You Send Images Into Space

Regarding prevention and treatment, Brown recommends the HPV vaccine, widely provided to everyone regardless of sex, gender, or sexual orientation before sexual debut, and for genital wart treatment.

“Even if the vaccine is not provided before sexual debut, there can be strong benefit if given at any time to prevent HPV-associated disease and also HIV,” he said.

“We know that HPV is the most common STI, and we know that HPV vaccine works to prevent chronic HPV infection. What we need now is to implement the vaccine in a better way. The availability in many other developing countries is low at best and absent at worst.” (IANS)

Comments are closed.

Next Story