Friday January 19, 2018

Global warming portends ill for India’s flourishing Dairy sector: Experts

India is self-sufficient in milk and is ranked the world's largest producer with an annual production of 156 million ton (2015-2016)

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Milk being poured in a glass, Pixabay
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Mumbai, Feb 17, 2017: Global warming portends ill for India’s flourishing dairy sector that stands to lose a whopping three million tonnes of milk in the next three years as average temperatures increase, with wide fluctuations in day and night temperatures, industry experts warned here on Friday. 17

Addressing the ongoing three-day “45th Dairy Industry Conference”, themed “Climate Change and Dairying”, several industry leaders and experts discussed how the gradually warming climate is adversely hitting the country’s dairy industry that employs over 16 million farmers, including 4.60 million women.

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President of Indian Dairy Association Arun D. Narke said that today, India is self-sufficient in milk and is ranked the world’s largest producer with an annual production of 156 million ton (2015-2016).

Citing the Ministry of Agriculture figures, he said Indian farmers are adding around 10 million tons of milk annually with a compounded annual growth of around 6.5 per cent in the sector, largely from farmers owning an average of one or two milch cows, to make the “White Revolution” a success.

However, this milk production could go down by three million tonne over the next three years as the average temperatures rise, creating problems of water and availability of green and dry fodder for the cattle, he said.

Indian Dairy Association (West Zone) Chairman Arun D. Patil said that Maharashtra has already undergone three consecutive years of drought till this year, which is set to affect the entire agriculture sector, including dairy.

Patil said most of India’s water needs are met through monsoon rains, which remained deficient for three years in a row, resulting in rising prices of fodder and increased cost of milk production.

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He urged the government to procure milk at a fixed price determined by the Centre as in the case of other agricultural commodities, like cotton or sugarcane, to enable the milk farmers get a minimum support price.

The industry has already initiated aggressive measures to deal with the upcoming crisis, farmers have started raising levels of animal shelters and scientists are researching on how to enhance the shelf-life of milk.

In this connection, A.K. Srivastava, Director and Vice Chancellor, Indian Council of Agricultural Research-National Dairy Research Institute (ICAR-NDRI), said even if we can achieve an increase in shelf-life of milk by half an hour, it would lead to massive profits to the dairy sector.

“The biggest challenge to the global dairy industry is expected between 2070-2090 when the temperatures are expected to rise between 2 degrees and 7 degrees,” predicted Srivastava grimly.

Additionally, he said, the Indian dairy sector faces huge shortage of skilled manpower with sound technical expertise in understanding the need for handling of milking cattle and related issues.

National Dairy Development Board (NDDB) Chairman Dilip Rath said that India accounts for 18 per cent of the global milk production, which is growing at around 6.5 per cent annually as compared to 4.7 per cent over the previous 10-year period.

“Milk is India’s single-largest agricultural commodity in value terms and is more than the combined value of paddy and wheat put together. The per capita availability of milk has increased three-folds, from 112 gm per day in 1970-1971 to 337 gm per day in 2016-2016.”

“The country’s milk demand is likely to increase by 190 million tonne by 2020 and catering to it poses a challenge with reducing farmlands and other issues,” Rath pointed out.

The conference welcomed the government’s initiative to allocate Rs 8,000 crore for three years for the growth and development of the dairy industry.

The three-day conference and exhibition, which got underway on February 16, has attracted 65 experts and 180 exhibitors from Indian, the USA, the UK, Germany, China, Bulgaria, Denmark, Finland, France, Italy, Lithuania, Malaysia, The Netherlands and Thailand, showcasing products, technologies and services. (IANS)

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India successfully test fires n-capable Agni-V ballistic missile

The missile was earlier tested successfully in 2012, 2013, 2015 and 2016.

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Nirbhay
The Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) sources said the Nirbhay missile test was "successful".(Representative image) VOA
  • India successfully tests the Agni-V ballistic missile on Thursday
  • This was the fifth test that missile underwent
  • With this success India is now in ranks with US, UK, China and Russia

India on Thursday successfully test fired its indigenously developed intercontinental surface-to-surface nuclear-capable ballistic missile Agni-V — the most potent and with the longest range in the Agni series – that can reach targets as far as Beijing.

The test took place at the Abdul Kalam Island facility off the Odisha coast. Defence Minister Nirmala Sitharaman tweeted about its success, congratulating its makers DRDO, the armed forces and the defence industry.

You may also like : Ballistic missile Agni-IV test fired as part of user trial

India has many high tech and powerful missiles to its name. Wikimedia Commons
India has many high tech and powerful missiles to its name. Wikimedia Commons

She said the successful test of the 5,000-km-range missile that can carry a one-tonne warhead, was “a major boost to the defence capabilities of our country”.

“The Made in India canistered missile, having three stages of propulsion, was successfully test fired,” she tweeted.

Developed by the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO), the Agni-V is the most advanced version of the Agni series, part of the Integrated Guided Missile Development Programme that started in the 1960s.

The missile was earlier tested successfully in 2012, 2013, 2015 and 2016.

This was the fifth test of the missile and likely to be its first user trial, though there was no official word on it.

India is developing new technologies everyday to strengthen its defence.
India is developing new technologies everyday to strengthen its defence.

Thursday’s test brings the missile closer to its induction in the tri-service Strategic Forces Command.

The missile has a much longer shelf life, with its container being made of special steel that absorbs the blast of the takeoff.

In the canisterised launch, a gas generator inside ejects the missile up to a height of about 30 metres. A motor is then ignited to fire the missile.

Also Read : Nikki Haley says North Korea Could Face Stronger Sanctions due to its 7th Missile test in 2017 .

With this missile, India joins the super-exclusive club of ICBM (missiles with a range of over 5,000-5,500 km) capable countries of the US, Russia, the UK, France and China. IANS