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Goodbye Doctor Zhivago: Actor Omar Sharif succumbs to cardiac arrest in Cairo

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London: Egyptian-born actor Omar Sharif, best known for his part in David Lean’s “Lawrence of Arabia” and the lead role in “Doctor Zhivago”, died of cardiac arrest on Friday, media reports said. He was 83.

“He suffered a heart attack this afternoon in a hospital in Cairo,” BBC quoted his agent Steve Kenis as saying.

Born Michel Demetri Chalhoub on April 10, 1932 in a Catholic family of Lebanese descent, Sharif started his career in Egyptian films in 1953 with “Sira Fi al-Wadi” (“The Blazing Sun”) opposite Faten Hamama, whom he later married (they were divorced in 1974).

He worked in over 20 films before being approached for the role of Sharif Ali in “Lawrence of Arabia” (1962) which was his first Hollywood movie.

As Sharif Ali, who silently glides from the dunes early in the movie and kills Lawrence’s guide for drinking from his well before taunting him “Have you no fear, English?”, Sharif more than held his own against a star-studded cast which included Peter O’Toole as Lawrence, Alec Guinness as Prince Feisal, Anthony Quinn as Auda and Claude Rains as Dryden.

He was nominated for the Oscars but didn’t win though. Later, he received two Golden Globe awards for his role.

His most famous work was as the title role of the tormented poet in Lean’s 1965 adapation of Boris Pasternak’s “Doctor Zhivago”, opposite Julie Christie as Larissa ‘Lara’ Antipova. He again did not win any of the five Oscars the film garnered for its epic cinematography and haunting music, especially “Lara’s Theme”, by Maurice Jarre but won a further Golden Globe three years later.

Among other major roles of the multi-lingual Sharif, who was comfortable in any cultural and historic setting, were as iconic revolutionary Che Guevara in “Che”, a German officer trying to trace a psychopathic murderer among the top brass in “The Night of the Generals”, in “The Fall of the Roman Empire”, as Genghis Khan in an eponymous film, the villain Colorado in Gregory Peck-starrer western treasure hunt “Mackenna’s Gold”, and a Soviet spy in Cold War drama “The Tamarind Seed”.

On TV, he essayed the role of doomed Czar Nicholas II in mini series “Anastasia” as well as of Khuda Daad in an adaption of M.M.Kaye’s “The Far Pavillions”.

Sharif, who was a devoted bridge player and authored several books on the card game, was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease in 2012.

(IANS)

 

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Television Academy sets new standards of professional conduct

One key document that has taken on added resonance with recent events is the Television Academy's Code of Ethics and Standards of Professional Conduct

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The Television Academy is participating as a member of the Commission on Sexual Harassment and Advancing Equality in the Workplace.
The Television Academy is participating as a member of the Commission on Sexual Harassment and Advancing Equality in the Workplace. Wikimedia Commons
  • Chairman Hayma Washington sent a letter to Academy members, linking to the two-page code of conduct
  • Violations of the code may result in disciplinary action
  • One key document that has taken on added resonance with recent events is the Television Academy’s Code of Ethics and Standards of Professional Conduct

Following the lead of the film academy and other Hollywood guilds, the Television Academy has established its own new code of ethics and standards of professional conduct.

Chairman Hayma Washington sent a letter to Academy members, linking to the two-page code of conduct, reports variety.com.

The document read: “The Academy has zero tolerance for discrimination or harassment, as well as illegal, dishonest or unethical conduct. The Academy will not tolerate, condone, or ignore unethical conduct and is committed to enforcing these standards at all levels.”

Violations of the code may result in disciplinary action, “up to and including being refused admission or ejected from an event, being barred from future events, or the suspension or expulsion of membership”.

Also Read: Where is Indian Television Steering?

In the wake of the sexual harassment allegations against Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein, the Academy voted in November to permanently expel him from their ranks.

The letter read: “As we recently announced, the Television Academy has taken the last year to review and revise several of its governing documents.

One key document that has taken on added resonance with recent events is the Television Academy’s Code of Ethics and Standards of Professional Conduct.

In the wake of the sexual harassment allegations against Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein, the Academy voted in November to permanently expel him from their ranks.
In the wake of the sexual harassment allegations against Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein, the Academy voted in November to permanently expel him from their ranks. Wikimedia Commons

“The watershed events of the past months gave new urgency for us to revisit and revise these ethical guidelines, leaving no doubt as to the conduct and the behaviours the Television Academy expects from its leadership, members and staff. Below, we are providing a link to the revised Code of Conduct that was recently approved by your Board of Governors. Please give it a thorough read.

“The Television Academy is also proud to be participating as a member of a new industry organisation, the Commission on Sexual Harassment and Advancing Equality in the Workplace.

Also Read: Google to nurture youth in technology through it’s 3-day India summit

“Like the Motion Picture Academy, Screen Actors Guild-American Federation of Television and Radio Artists (SAG/AFTRA) and other members of the Commission, we are committed to achieving and supporting safer, more equitable and accountable workplaces.

Our revised Academy guidelines make clear that we expect nothing less from Academy leadership, members and staff than respectful conduct and behaviours that foster and maintain environments free of disruption, abuse, discrimination and harassment of others – during and outside of Academy events. This Code of Conduct is an acknowledgement that all of us share the responsibility for upholding a positive, professional, inclusive and supportive environment for our Academy business and member activities.” (IANS)