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Google Arts and Culture unveils Virtual Collection of Artworks and Exhibitions on Lives of Indian Women in History

Google Arts & Culture created by the Google Cultural Institute is a new, immersive way to experience art, history, culture and world wonders

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Technology Giant Google. Pixabay
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Mumbai, November 19, 2016: Technology giant Google has on Saturday, through its cultural arm Google Arts & Culture, unveiled a virtual collection of artworks and exhibitions on the life of Indian women in history — spanning 2,500 years and from 26 cultural institutions across the country, the company said in a statement here.

‘Women in India: Unheard Stories,’ is a collection of over fifty virtual exhibitions with more than 1,800 artworks, photographs and videos, captures the stories of India’s unsung heroines ranging from goddesses to leaders, artists and doctors.

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“This project is an effort to recognise the impact of Indian women in history and their impact on culture and while looking at where we are, we also wanted to look forward and inspire women and leaders of the future,” said Luisella Mazza, Head of Operations at Google Cultural Institute, while speaking at the launch.

The immersive narratives, which includes exemplars like Rakhmabai — the first practicing woman doctor — and Muthulakshmi Reddi — the first woman legislator — as well as artworks by several young women artists, were in partnership with Zubaan Books, India’s first feminist publisher, and can be accessed at g.co/WomenOfIndia.

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“It is our ongoing effort to make important cultural material available and accessible to everyone and to digitally preserve it to educate and inspire future generations,” Mazza added.

Google Arts & Culture created by the Google Cultural Institute is a new, immersive way to experience art, history, culture and world wonders from over a thousand organisations worldwide.

Users can also tour historical exhibits that capture stories from as early as the 1st century BCE from the Indian Museum in Kolkata, on Saktirupena – on how the Mother Goddess has been depicted in Indian art across millennia.

Additionally, there are 17 new virtual exhibits from the Centre for Art & Archaeology of the American Institute of Indian Studies.

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Users can also explore gigapixel images captured by using our latest innovation, The Art Camera – a robotic, custom built camera that moves to capture hundreds of high resolution close-ups of the painting.

These collections by can be explored on the web, iOS and Android. (IANS)

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‘Good morning’ messages are cluttering smartphones in India

According to Google, there has been a 10-fold rise in the number of searches for "Good Morning images."

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'Good Morning' messages clutter smartphones.
'Good Morning' messages clutter smartphones.
  • ‘Good Morning’ messages are the reason for cluttering of smartphones
  • These messages make smartphones run out of memory
  • Google is trying to weed these messages out

With millions of “good morning” texts, spiced with colourful images and even videos sent and received every morning across India, one in three smartphone user in India runs out of space daily, as compared to one in 10 in the US, the media reported.

According to Google, there has been a 10-fold rise in the number of searches for “Good Morning images” over the past five years.

'Good Morning' messages are eating out your smartphone's memory. Wikimedia Commons
‘Good Morning’ messages are eating out your smartphone’s memory. Wikimedia Commons

It is because Indians have a habit of sending millions of ‘good morning!’ texts along with sun-dappled flowers, adorable toddlers and birds to friends, family and strangers, the Wall Street Journal reported on Tuesday.

Inexpensive smartphones and data plans have brought an unlikely group of users online who begin their typical day — before sunrise and reaches a crescendo before 8 a.m. — by sending good morning greetings.

“We were trying to deconstruct what is the DNA of a good morning message for months. It’s been a lot of hard work to get it right,” Josh Woodward, the Google product manager in Mountain View, California, was quoted as telling the Wall Street Journal.

Also Read : India now the leading market of smartphones in Asia

Currently, there are nearly 400 million Internet users in India, along with over 300 million smartphone users and about 650 million mobile phone users.

The company used its giant image database and artificial intelligence tools to train the app to weed out good morning messages.

Google is trying to weed images with this message out. Pixabay
Google is trying to weed images with this message out. Pixabay

The key to spotting them was looking for a certain size and type of image file, Woodward said, adding that early versions were picking out photos of children wearing T-shirts with words on them.

To counter such storage problem, Google in December launched a new app called “Files Go” that will help free up space, find files faster and share files offline on smartphones that come with less internal storage.

Also Read : Top 5 smartphones trending in India in 2016

“The average ‘Files Go’ user is saving 1GB of space so they can do more on their phone. It was built for Android Go devices, but we’re also making it available on the Google Play Store,” the company said, at the launch of the product in New Delhi.

The app has more than 10 million downloads so far, with more users in India than any other country. It has cleared up on average more than 1 gigabyte of data per user, Google said. IANS