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Google Investigating The Root Cause Of Its Malfunction

ThousandEyes detected intermittent availability issues to Google services from some locations.

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A Google logo is displayed at the entrance to the internet based company's offices in Toronto. VOA

After several users complained that they were either unable to access Google services like YouTube on Tuesday, the tech giant confirmed the root cause of this was “external” and under investigation.

Internet research firm ThousandEyes, however, claimed that “traffic to certain Google destinations appears to be routed through an ISP in Russia and black-holed at a China Telecom gateway router”.

The disruption in Google services was limited to nearly an hour.

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The YouTube Music app is displayed on a mobile phone in Los Angeles. VOA

“Throughout the duration of this issue Google services were operating as expected and we believe the root cause of the issue was external to Google,” the company said.

“We will conduct an internal investigation of this issue and make appropriate improvements to our systems to help prevent or minimize future recurrence.”

According to media reports, G Suite applications like Gmail and Google Drive were not impacted.

Google described the issue as “Google Cloud IP addresses being erroneously advertised by internet service providers other than Google”.

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A Google logo is seen at the company’s headquarters in Mountain View, California, VOA

ThousandEyes named China Telecom, Nigerian-provider MainOne and Russian network operator TransTelekom behind this incident.

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“Potential hijack underway. ThousandEyes detected intermittent availability issues to Google services from some locations. Traffic to certain Google destinations appears to be routed through an ISP in Russia & black-holed at a China Telecom gateway router,” ThousandEyes tweeted.

Google told the Wall Street Journal that users’ data was not compromised, adding that “and that the company has no reason to believe that the incident was malicious”. (IANS)

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Google’s Smart City Plan Upsets Toronto Residents

Sidewalk Labs told the BBC it looked forward to “continuing to work with Torontonians to get this right”, adding it was “strongly committed to protection and privacy” of urban data

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FILE - A woman walks past the logo for Google at the China International Import Expo in Shanghai, Nov. 5, 2018. VOA

Google-affiliate Sidewalk Labs’s plan to build an Internet-based smart city in Toronto has sparked fear and anxiety among residents, the media reported.

Sidewalk Labs’ plan of collecting data through sensors placed all around the harbourside development unsettled some, the BBC reported on Saturday.

The company acquired land in the Canadian city and promised a radical mix of offices, retail and makerspaces with a green agenda, robots and underground waste disposal.

According to a group of citizens called Block Sidewalk, people expressed their unhappiness over the project, announced a couple of years back, at a meeting organised by it.

Few raised questions about lack of transparency in the way Toronto Waterfront had awarded the contract to Sidewalk Labs, others expressed doubt if the firm could deliver such an ambitious project. Some had concerns about the company’s long-term plan about the area.

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A man walks past a Google sign outside with a span of the Bay Bridge at rear in San Francisco, May 1, 2019. VOA

“We have not been talking about the fact that it’s normalising massive data collection or even asking whether anyone wants this thing at all. No one here has asked for a sensor-laden neighbourhood,” organiser of the meeting Bianca Wylie told the BBC.

“Our waterfront must be developed for the benefit of citizens of Toronto, not the shareholders of a Google-affiliate,” Wylie said.

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Sidewalk Labs told the BBC it looked forward to “continuing to work with Torontonians to get this right”, adding it was “strongly committed to protection and privacy” of urban data.

A report published in the Toronto Star suggested that Sidewalk Labs wanted to build a much bigger neighbourhood at Quayside and provide new transport for it, a claim that has not been disputed by the Google affiliate. (IANS)