Tuesday June 19, 2018
Home Lead Story Google Now Sa...

Google Now Says Controversial AI Caller Will Identify Itself to Humans

Google CEO Sundar Pichai introduced Duplex earlier this week in the company's annual developer's conference Google I/O and demonstrated how the AI system could book an appointment at a salon

0
//
24
Report: Google Needs to do More on Bridging Gender Gap
Report: Google Needs to do More on Bridging Gender Gap. Pixabay
Republish
Reprint

In a bid to deliver transparency in technology and stay ahead of ethical pitfalls, Google has said that its Artificial Intelligence (AI) calling system “Duplex” would now identify itself while making appointments.

Following the launch of the “Duplex” system, which lets AI mimic a human voice to make appointments and book tables, among other functions, a widespread outcry over the ethical dilemmas were raised by tech critics.

Google clarified to The Verge that the experimental system would have a “disclosure built-in” that means that whenever Duplex gets involved in some type of verbal communication with a human at the other end, it would identify that the human is talking to an AI.

“We understand and value the discussion around Google Duplex, as we have said from the beginning, transparency in the technology is important,” a Google spokesperson was quoted as saying.

Google.
Google. Pixabay

“We are designing this feature with disclosure built-in, and we will make sure the system is appropriately identified. What we showed at I/O was an early technology demo, and we look forward to incorporating feedback as we develop this into a product,” the spokesperson added.

Google CEO Sundar Pichai introduced Duplex earlier this week in the company’s annual developer’s conference Google I/O and demonstrated how the AI system could book an appointment at a salon and a table at a restaurant.

In the demo, the Google Assistant sounded like a human. It used Google DeepMind’s new WaveNet audio-generation technique and other advances in Natural Language Processing (NLP) to replicate human speech patterns.

Also Read: A Smarter Assistant to Offer 6 New Voices

However, tech critics raised questions on the morality of the technology saying it was developed without proper oversight or regulation.

According to tech critic Zeynep Tufekci, the demo was “horrifying” and the initial positive audience reaction at I/O was evidence that “Silicon Valley is ethically lost, rudderless and has not learned a thing”.

Google had originally said in a blog post written by engineers Yaniv Leviathan and Yossi Matias that “it’s important to us that users and businesses have a good experience with this service and transparency is a key part of that”. (IANS)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2018 NewsGram

Next Story

Report: Google Needs to do More on Bridging Gender Gap

In February this year, the US National Labour Relations Board (NLRB) said that Google did not violate labour laws when it fired Damore

0
Report: Google Needs to do More on Bridging Gender Gap
Report: Google Needs to do More on Bridging Gender Gap. Pixabay

Although the percentage of women in leadership roles at Google has increased from 20.8 to 25.5 per cent in the last four years, women still make up only 30.9 per cent of its global workforce while men 69.1 per cent, the tech giant has revealed.

In its annual diversity report released on Thursday, Google said it has made some progress in leadership ranks by gender and ethnicity.

“The data in this report shows that despite significant effort, and some pockets of success, we need to do more to achieve our desired diversity and inclusion outcomes,” said Danielle Brown, VP-Chief Diversity and Inclusion Officer.

In 2017, women hires in tech positions rose to 24.5 per cent, although overall hiring of women dropped from 31.4 per cent to 31.2 per cent.

“Since 2014, women hires in tech have increased from 20.8 per cent to 24.5 per cent, which shows that our focus on hiring more women into technical positions is having impact,” said Brown.

The diversity report came after a year when an employee named James Damore sent out a long anti-diversity memo and was later fired.

Damore’s memo, titled “Google’s Ideological Echo Chamber”, claims that when it comes to technology, there is a biological difference between men and women.

Representational image.
Google on a smartphone device, Pixabay

In February this year, the US National Labour Relations Board (NLRB) said that Google did not violate labour laws when it fired Damore.

According to the new diversity report, in terms of race and ethnicity (US data only), 2.5 per cent of Google’s workforce is Black, 3.6 per cent is Hispanic/Latin, 36.3 per cent is Asian and 53.1 per cent is White.

“Our gains in women’s representation have largely been driven by White and Asian women. Representation of Asian women increased considerably to 12.5 per cent of Google’s workforce, up from 10 per cent overall in 2014,” the report noted.

This is lower than the increase for Asian men who make up 25.7 per cent of Google, up from 21.4 per cent in 2014.

Also Read: Google: Fully Responsible For Securing Customers’ Data

Attrition rates in 2017 were highest for Black Googlers followed by Latin Googlers, and lowest for Asian Googlers.

“Black Googler attrition rates, while improving in recent years, have offset some of our hiring gains, which has led to smaller increases in representation than we would have seen otherwise.”

“We’re working hard to better understand what drives higher attrition and taking focused measures to improve it,” Brown added. (IANS)