Sunday November 18, 2018
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Govt may restrict sale of antibiotics

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

Dili (Timor Leste): The government may shortly issue restrictions on prescription and sale of commonly-used antibiotics in a bid to avoid development of drug resistance to infectious diseases like tuberculosis, malaria, urinary tract infection (UTI) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

Photo credit: www.brainwaving.com
Photo credit: www.brainwaving.com

If this measure is implemented, doctors and chemists will have to follow certain mandatory protocols and guidelines when they prescribe antibiotics. Even chemists will have to maintain records of all kinds of antibiotics that they procure and sell along with the doctor’s prescription.

This is a move which has been implemented or is in the process of implementation, by all member countries of World Health Organisation (WHO) in a bid to fight drug-resistant diseases.

WHO will monitor the implementation of the strategy at its current South East Asia Regional Committee meeting in Timor Leste. However, India has a big lead of the May 2017 deadline set up at the World Health Assembly meeting of WHO in Geneva in May, officials said. According to the resolution passed at the Assembly, the countries need to frame plans by May 2017 and align them with WHO’s global strategy.

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Eastern Congo Suffers From a Deadly Ebola Outbreak

Some people still refuse to believe Ebola exists and have hidden infected family members.

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Ebola, WHO
In this photo taken Sept 9, 2018, a health worker sprays disinfectant on his colleague after working at an Ebola treatment center in Beni, DRC. VOA

An outbreak of Ebola in the eastern region of the Democratic Republic of Congo has killed more than 200 people. Almost 300 Ebola cases have been confirmed since the outbreak began in August, authorities say.

The health ministry said half of the cases were in Beni, a city of 800,000 people, in the North Kivu province.

The outbreak is in a conflict zone where dozens of armed groups operate. Aid agencies have been forced to suspend or slow down their work on several occasions since the outbreak.

Ebola, WHO
A health care worker from the World Health Organization, left, gives an Ebola vaccination to a front line aid worker who will then vaccinate people who might potentially have the virus, in Mbandaka, Congo. VOA

Health Minister Oly Ilunga said his response teams “have faced threats, physical assaults, repeated destruction of their equipment and kidnapping.”

“Two of our colleagues in the Rapid Response Medical Unit have even lost their lives in an attack,” Ilunga said.

Ebola was detected in the DRC in 1976. The current outbreak is the tenth since it was first discovered.

The World Health Organization has warned the virus could spread to nearby countries, including Uganda, Rwanda and Burundi.

congo, ebola
Health care workers from the World Health Organization prepare to give an Ebola vaccination to a front-line aid worker in Beni, Democratic Republic of the Congo. VOA

Medical workers have lots of experience dealing with Ebola outbreaks in the DRC. Fortunately, they have new tools to fight the deadly virus. A new vaccine has shown it can protect people who’ve come into contact with Ebola victims, and more people have learned techniques to keep the virus from spreading.

Also Read: Uganda Readies Itself To Fight Off Ebola From The DRC Border

However, old problems persist with every outbreak. Some people still refuse to believe Ebola exists and have hidden infected family members. Traditional burial practices also put people at risk. (VOA)