Monday January 21, 2019
Home India Govt may rest...

Govt may restrict sale of antibiotics

0
//

By NewsGram Staff Writer

Dili (Timor Leste): The government may shortly issue restrictions on prescription and sale of commonly-used antibiotics in a bid to avoid development of drug resistance to infectious diseases like tuberculosis, malaria, urinary tract infection (UTI) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

Photo credit: www.brainwaving.com
Photo credit: www.brainwaving.com

If this measure is implemented, doctors and chemists will have to follow certain mandatory protocols and guidelines when they prescribe antibiotics. Even chemists will have to maintain records of all kinds of antibiotics that they procure and sell along with the doctor’s prescription.

This is a move which has been implemented or is in the process of implementation, by all member countries of World Health Organisation (WHO) in a bid to fight drug-resistant diseases.

WHO will monitor the implementation of the strategy at its current South East Asia Regional Committee meeting in Timor Leste. However, India has a big lead of the May 2017 deadline set up at the World Health Assembly meeting of WHO in Geneva in May, officials said. According to the resolution passed at the Assembly, the countries need to frame plans by May 2017 and align them with WHO’s global strategy.

Next Story

Road Traffic Accidents Cause 1.35 Mn Deaths Each Year: WHO

WHO noted that 48 middle- and high-income countries that have implemented strong road traffic laws and other safety measures have made progress in reducing road deaths.

0
Traffic Crashes, Road Traffic
Two bikes were involved in an accident with a bus that crashed and turned on its roof near the town of Franschhoek, South Africa, March 7, 2015. VOA

The World Health Organization (WHO) is calling for urgent action to put a brake on road traffic crashes that kill 1.35 million people every year, mostly in poor developing countries.

In Geneva, the U.N. agency launched its global status report on road safety 2018.

The report found road traffic injuries to be the leading killer of children and young people aged five to 29 years, with a death occurring every 24 seconds. The report said more than half of those killed are pedestrians, cyclists, and motorcycle riders and passengers.

Etienne Krug, head of the U.N. Agency’s Department on Disability, Violence and Injury Prevention, called these deaths a huge inequality issue.

Traffic Signals, Road Traffic
Traffic and congestion on roads is frequent in all cities of India. Wikimedia

“Low-income countries have one percent of the vehicles in the world and 13 percent of all the deaths; while high-income countries have 40 percent of all the vehicles,” Krug said. “So, that is 40 times more, but only seven percent of the deaths.That is half of the deaths with 40 times more vehicles.”

The report said death rates are highest in Africa and lowest in Europe. Some of the key risk factors include speeding, drinking and driving, and failure to use seat belts, motorcycle helmets and child restraints.

Krug said putting the right measures in place will save lives. These include the right legislation and enforcement, creating special lanes for cyclists and improving the quality of vehicles.

Road accidents in India
Road accidents in India. Pixabay

“It is not acceptable that vehicles are being sold in developing countries that look the same as the vehicles that we see here in Switzerland or the U.S. or anywhere else, but that are not,” Krug told VOA. “Because to make them cheaper, they have been stripped of all of their safety features, such as air bags or electronic stability control, etc.”

WHO noted that 48 middle- and high-income countries that have implemented strong road traffic laws and other safety measures have made progress in reducing road deaths.

Also Read: HIV Epidemic Spreading Rapidly in Pakistan: WHO

However, it said no such progress has been made in low-income countries where safety measures are lacking. (VOA)