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Great Potential For Books In India: International Bestselling Authors

Greer also said that while India is a "fascinating market" for international authors, Indian authors should also be published in other countries.

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literature
Scottish novelist, playwright and short story writer Irvine Welsh echoed similar sentiments, stating that people in India are reading "a lot of books".

India’s vibrant publishing market is attracting major international bestselling authors, who say that there is a great potential for their books to find a good readership in India.

Once a book becomes successful in the country where it is first published, international rights for the books are acquired by leading publishing houses in other countries. India, being the second largest publishing market in the world, is one hot spot where perhaps every successful author wants to be published.

Former British politician and bestselling novelist Jeffrey Archer, for instance, finds more readers in India than anywhere else in the world. In pure statistical terms, his books also sell more in India than anywhere else.

authors
India’s vibrant publishing market is attracting major international bestselling authors, who say that there is a great potential for their books to find a good readership in India. : Pixabay

What message does it send to award-winning or bestselling authors from other countries? That the market is ripe for harvest!

“I think there is a lot of potential here; I know some great writers from India, they write from their heart. I also think it is a great place to publish and I can only see more and more authors coming here,”Australian author Markus Zusak of “The Book Thief” fame told IANS on the sidelines of the Jaipur Literature Festival.

Scottish novelist, playwright and short story writer Irvine Welsh echoed similar sentiments, stating that people in India are reading “a lot of books”.

He said that festivals like the JLF also provide a platform for authors like him to find new readers. “I think there is a great potential, he said.

Pulitzer Prize winning author Andrew Sean Greer, who is on a marathon book tour of India, attending lit fests in Chennai and Kolkata before coming to Jaipur, said that he is excited about the new readers his book “Less” is finding in India.

Harry Potter books. (Representational image)

“In the united States, we don’t have a culture of reading many books from outside. We do not import much whereas I find it to be very different here,” Greer told IANS.

He said winning an award like the Pulitzer does contribute to international recognition, but maintained that it is ultimately up to the readers, and the reading culture at large.

“When I come to festivals like this in India, the one thing that surprises me most is people here read and come. I am saying this because people have asked me questions about my Gay protagonist, which means they have read my book.

“Otherwise, they say that I have not read your book, or have read only half. There is genuine interest among readers and I think right now it’s the place where every writer wants to be,” Greer added.

Also Read: Ruskin Bond Talks On Children Losing Their Innocence

Greer also said that while India is a “fascinating market” for international authors, Indian authors should also be published in other countries.

A slew of international authors, including the recipients of major literary awards and those who are a sensation in themselves like Archer, have gathered here to participate in the JLF. (IANS)

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Reading with Your Children Can Make You a Better Parent, Say Researchers

The results showed that frequent shared reading at age 1 was associated with less harsh parenting at age 3, and frequent shared reading at age 3 was associated with less harsh parenting at age 5

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Reading
Toddler reading a book. Pixabay
People who regularly read with their kids are less likely to engage in harsh parenting and their children are less likely to be hyperactive and have attention problems, say researchers.
The study, published in the Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics, suggests additional benefits from shared reading — a stronger parent-child bond.
“For parents, the simple routine of reading with your child on a daily basis provides not just academic but emotional benefits that can help bolster the child’s success in school and beyond,” said study lead researcher Manuel Jimenez, Assistant Professor at Rutgers University in the US.
“Our findings can be applied to programmes that help parents and care givers in underserved areas to develop positive parenting skills,” Jimenez said.
Family gathers for reading Ramayana. Image Source: The Hindu
For the study, the research team reviewed data on over 2,000 mother-child pairs from 20 large US cities in which the women were asked how often they read to their children at ages 1 and or 3.
The mothers were re-interviewed two years later, about how often they engaged in physically and/or psychologically aggressive discipline and about their children’s behaviour.
The results showed that frequent shared reading at age 1 was associated with less harsh parenting at age 3, and frequent shared reading at age 3 was associated with less harsh parenting at age 5.
Mothers who read frequently with their children also reported fewer disruptive behaviours from their children, which may partially explain the reduction in harsh parenting behaviours, said the study. (IANS)