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Green Crusader of Kolkata: Meet, Dhananjoy Chakraborty, the cab driver who created a rooftop garden on his taxi

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By Arnab Mitra

An ardent environment lover, Dhananjoy Chakravorty has transformed his taxi into a small garden to convey the message of saving the environment.

The 40-year-old driver has created a garden on top of his taxi and has a mini green area in the trunk of his Ambassador car with potted plants. His taxi, named as ‘Sobuj Rath’ or Green Chariot, also has social messages painted inside it.

In an interaction with NewsGram, Dhanonjoy shared the thoughts behind his innovative project ‘Green Chariot’.

Arnab Mitra: How did the idea of ‘Green Chariot’ come into your mind?

Dhananjoy Chakravorty: It all started three years ago when my wife Sharita planted a small tree on the roof of my taxi. It looked very beautiful and with the consultation of my owner Amardeep Singh, I took the initiative to fulfill my dream project ‘Green Chariot’.

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AM: Were there any hurdles during the assembling of the ‘Green Chariot’?

DC: The main obstacle was money. As a taxi driver, it is very hard to make any savings. But with the help of my wife and support of my owner, I made this ‘Green Taxi’ with an estimated cost of Rs.55, 000.

Besides this, I have to take care of this new garden every day as it is difficult to keep the plants alive in this weather.

AM: Passengers say that it is really comfortable to ride in your taxi, what do you have to say about this?

DC: Thanks to my small garden! The plants absorb the heat of the sun, so there is always a moderate temperature inside my taxi.

AM: People say that it is just a show-off and you can’t continue as it isn’t cost effective, would you like to comment on that?

DC: Some people will always feel jealous. But people are with me, and I will continue to spread the message of saving the mother Earth.

AM: What are your future plans?

DC: The project is at its initial stage, so it is hard to say now. But on the World Environment Day (June 5) I have a plan to make a rally from Karunamoyee to Maidan and invite people to join. I will also distribute some of my paintings on the theme ‘Save Nature’.

AM: Any message you want to give to the society.

DC: Nature is our best friend. Don’t destroy it. Save nature for the benefit of mankind.

 

 

Next Story

New Study Indicates, Life on Earth May Have Begun in Ponds But Not Oceans

"Our overall message is, if you think the origin of life required fixed nitrogen, as many people do, then it's tough to have the origin of life happen in the ocean," s

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Nitrogenous oxides were likely deposited in water bodies, including oceans and ponds, as remnants of the breakdown of nitrogen in Earth's atmosphere. Pixabay

Challenging a common perception, a new study suggests primitive ponds may have provided a suitable environment for creating Earth’s first life forms, more so than oceans.

The findings published in the journal Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems showed shallow water bodies could have held high concentrations of what many scientists believe to be a key ingredient for jump-starting life on Earth: nitrogen.

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Scientists believe there could have been enough lightning crackling through the early atmosphere to produce an abundance of nitrogenous oxides to fuel the origin of life in the ocean. Pixabay

“Our overall message is, if you think the origin of life required fixed nitrogen, as many people do, then it’s tough to have the origin of life happen in the ocean,” said lead author Sukrit Ranjan from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). “It’s much easier to have that happen in a pond,” Ranjan said.

Nitrogenous oxides were likely deposited in water bodies, including oceans and ponds, as remnants of the breakdown of nitrogen in Earth’s atmosphere.

Atmospheric nitrogen comprises two nitrogen molecules, linked via a strong triple bond, that can only be broken by an extremely energetic event — namely, lightning.

Scientists believe there could have been enough lightning crackling through the early atmosphere to produce an abundance of nitrogenous oxides to fuel the origin of life in the ocean.

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In the ocean, ultraviolet light and dissolved iron would have made nitrogenous oxides far less available for synthesising living organisms. Pixabay

But the new study found that ultraviolet light from the Sun and dissolved iron sloughed off from primitive oceanic rocks could have destroyed a significant portion of nitrogenous oxides in the ocean, sending the compounds back into the atmosphere as nitrogen.

Also Read: Trump Considers Sending Detained Illegal Migrants to Sanctuary Cities

In the ocean, ultraviolet light and dissolved iron would have made nitrogenous oxides far less available for synthesising living organisms.

In shallow ponds, however, life would have had a better chance to grow, mainly because ponds have much less volume over which compounds can be diluted. As a result, nitrogenous oxides would have built up to much higher concentrations, the study said. (IANS)