Tuesday January 22, 2019
Home Uncategorized Green Crusade...

Green Crusader of Kolkata: Meet, Dhananjoy Chakraborty, the cab driver who created a rooftop garden on his taxi

0
//

IMG_7078

By Arnab Mitra

An ardent environment lover, Dhananjoy Chakravorty has transformed his taxi into a small garden to convey the message of saving the environment.

The 40-year-old driver has created a garden on top of his taxi and has a mini green area in the trunk of his Ambassador car with potted plants. His taxi, named as ‘Sobuj Rath’ or Green Chariot, also has social messages painted inside it.

In an interaction with NewsGram, Dhanonjoy shared the thoughts behind his innovative project ‘Green Chariot’.

Arnab Mitra: How did the idea of ‘Green Chariot’ come into your mind?

Dhananjoy Chakravorty: It all started three years ago when my wife Sharita planted a small tree on the roof of my taxi. It looked very beautiful and with the consultation of my owner Amardeep Singh, I took the initiative to fulfill my dream project ‘Green Chariot’.

IMG_7071

AM: Were there any hurdles during the assembling of the ‘Green Chariot’?

DC: The main obstacle was money. As a taxi driver, it is very hard to make any savings. But with the help of my wife and support of my owner, I made this ‘Green Taxi’ with an estimated cost of Rs.55, 000.

Besides this, I have to take care of this new garden every day as it is difficult to keep the plants alive in this weather.

AM: Passengers say that it is really comfortable to ride in your taxi, what do you have to say about this?

DC: Thanks to my small garden! The plants absorb the heat of the sun, so there is always a moderate temperature inside my taxi.

AM: People say that it is just a show-off and you can’t continue as it isn’t cost effective, would you like to comment on that?

DC: Some people will always feel jealous. But people are with me, and I will continue to spread the message of saving the mother Earth.

AM: What are your future plans?

DC: The project is at its initial stage, so it is hard to say now. But on the World Environment Day (June 5) I have a plan to make a rally from Karunamoyee to Maidan and invite people to join. I will also distribute some of my paintings on the theme ‘Save Nature’.

AM: Any message you want to give to the society.

DC: Nature is our best friend. Don’t destroy it. Save nature for the benefit of mankind.

 

 

Next Story

Asteroids Are Falling On Earth’s Surface Twice As Often: Study

This enhanced impact rate poses a threat for the next mass extinction event.

0
Asteroids
This Dec. 29, 1968, photo made available by NASA shows craters on the moon. For the past 290 million years, giant rocks from space have been crashing into Earth more than twice as often as they did in the previous 700 million years, according to a new study. VOA

Giant rocks from space are falling from the sky more than they used to, but don’t worry.

For the past 290 million years, large asteroids have been crashing into Earth more than twice as often as they did in the previous 700 million years, according to a new study in Thursday’s journal Science.

But no need to cast a wary glance up. Asteroids still only smack Earth on average every million or few million years, even with the increased crash rate. NASA’s list of potential big space rock crashes shows no pending major threats. The biggest known risk is a 4,200-foot (1.3-km) wide asteroid with a 99.988 percent chance that it will miss Earth when it whizzes very near here in 861 years.

Tell that to the dinosaurs. Most scientists think dinosaurs and a lot of other species went extinct after a huge space rock crashed into Central America about 65 million years ago.

Earth, Asteroids
Taurids meteor shower lights up the sky. The risk of asteroids hitting the Earth has grown over the years. Wikimedia

“It’s just a game of probabilities,” said study lead author Sara Mazrouei, a University of Toronto planetary scientist. “These events are still rare and far between that I’m not too worried about it.”

Mazrouei and colleagues in the United Kingdom and United States compiled a list of impact craters on Earth and the moon that were larger than 12 miles (20 km) wide and came up with the dates of them. It takes a space rock that’s half a mile (800 meters) wide to create holes that big.

The team counted 29 craters that were no older than 290 million years and nine between 291 million years and 650 million years old.

But we can see relatively few big craters on Earth because the planet is more than 70 percent ocean and past glaciers smoothed out some holes, said University of Toronto planetary scientist Rebecca Ghent, a study co-author.

Earth, Asteroids
These rocks were rare survivors from a very different time on Earth. Pixabay

Extrapolating for what can’t be seen brings the total to about 260 space crashes on Earth in the last 290 million years. Adding in other factors, the science team determined that the current space crash rate is 2.6 times more than the previous 700 million years.

Craters older than 650 million years are mostly wiped off on Earth by glacial forces so the scientists used impact craters on the nearby moon as a stand-in for holes between 650 million and 1 billion years old. The moon is a good guide for estimating Earth crashes, because it is close enough to be in the same bombardment path and its craters last longer.

Mixed reactions

So what happened nearly 300 million years ago?

“Perhaps an asteroid family was broken up in the asteroid belt,” Mazrouei speculated. The space rocks then headed toward the Earth and moon, and the planet got slightly more because it is a bigger target and it has higher gravity, Ghent said.

Oldest known asteroid family
An asteroid family. Wikimedia

Outside scientists are split about the research. Jay Melosh at Purdue said he found the number of craters too small to come to a reasonable conclusion, but Harvard’s Avi Loeb said the case was convincing.

Also Read: Newly Discovered Super-Earth Exoplanet May Sustain Primitive Life

Humans might not have emerged without mass extinctions from space rocks about 250 million and 65 million years ago, Loeb said in an email, adding, “but this enhanced impact rate poses a threat for the next mass extinction event, which we should watch for and attempt to avoid with the aid of technology.”

“This demonstrates how arbitrary and fragile human life is,” Loeb wrote. (VOA)