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Guatemala’s Volcano Fires Up Again

Dozens of people were buried alive or burned beyond recognition in June when the volcano expelled smoldering gas

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A plume of smoke and ash rises from the Volcano of Fire, June 15, 2018, as seen from San Miguel Los Lotes, Guatemala. Guatemala's Volcano of Fire, one of the region's most active, started spewing ash again Friday. VOA
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Guatemala’s Volcano of Fire spewed ash and lava Saturday just months after an eruption killed at least 110 people.

The country’s seismology and volcanology institute said hot lava was spilling from the crater and flowing toward a ravine.

Constant rumblings sounded like an engine, and columns of gray ash billowed 4,600 meters (15,091 feet) into the air.

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Authorities urged nearby residents to evacuate and be alert for possible lahars — flows of mud, debris, water.

Authorities urged nearby residents to evacuate and be alert for possible lahars — flows of mud, debris, water and pyroclastic material — that could be fed by afternoon rains.

The Volcano of Fire is one of the most active in Central America.

Also Read: Rise in Temperature of Atlantic Ocean Causes Severe Hurricanes: Study

Dozens of people were buried alive or burned beyond recognition in June when the volcano expelled smoldering gas, ash and rock, catching residents off guard.

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U.S,Canada Warned About E. Coli Outbreak In Lettuce

The agency said the current outbreak is unrelated to another multistate rash of E. coli infections related to romaine lettuce earlier this year.

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A crew member stands in a pile of discarded romaine lettuce leaves while working near Soledad, Calif., May 3, 2017. A current outbreak of E. coli traced to romaine lettuce has sickened 50 people in the U.S. and Canada. VOA

Public health officials in the United States and Canada on Tuesday warned against eating romaine lettuce while they investigate an outbreak of E. coli that has sickened 50 people in the two countries, including 13 who were hospitalized.

The alerts, issued as millions of Americans plan their Thanksgiving Day menus, covered all forms of romaine, including whole heads, hearts, bags, mixes and Caesar salad.

Officials were uncertain of the source of the tainted lettuce.

E. Coli
A variety of lettuce grows on a floating farm known as a “chinampa” in Xochimilco, Mexico City, July 13, 2017.

“Consumers who have any type of romaine lettuce in their home should not eat it and should throw it away, even if some of it was eaten and no one has gotten sick,” the U.S. Centers for Disease Control said in its food safety alert.

Refrigerator drawers and shelves where romaine lettuce had been stored should be sanitized, the CDC said.

The Public Health Agency of Canada, which is investigating 18 of the E. coli cases, directed its romaine lettuce alert at consumers in Ontario and Quebec.

In the United States, the CDC said the outbreak affected 32 people in 11 states between Oct. 8 and Oct. 31. No deaths have been reported, it said.

E. Coli
Salad containing lettuce. Pixabay.

Symptoms of the infection often include a moderate fever, severe stomach cramps, vomiting and diarrhea, which is often bloody, the CDC said. Most people get better in five to seven days, but it can be life-threatening, it said.

Also Read: Eastern Congo Suffers From a Deadly Ebola Outbreak

The agency said the current outbreak is unrelated to another multistate rash of E. coli infections related to romaine lettuce earlier this year that left five people dead and sickened nearly 200.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the CDC traced the origin of that contamination to irrigation water in the Yuma, Ariz., growing region. (VOA)