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Gunmen take people hostage in Mali

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A French-speaking Special Forces NCO watches weapons marksmanship training for a member of a Malian counter-terrorism unit during one of over 30 pre-scheduled military training engagements planned, coordinated and managed by SOCAFRICA’s JSOTF-TS. Keen in the myriad of different weapons used around the world, Special Forces teams provide capacity development training and advisement to pre-designated host nation units whose mission is to provide for the security of the vast and barren northern territories. Planned, coordinated and managed under the auspices of the State Department’s Trans-Saharan Counter Terrorism Partnership, Department of Defense TSCTP activities in the region are planned, coordinated and conducted under the auspices of Operation Enduring Freedom (Trans-Sahara) and are managed by SOCAFRICA’s Joint Special Operations Task Force (Trans-Sahara). (Photos are provided by JSOTF-TS Public Affairs)
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Bamako: At least five people, including soldiers, have been killed in a terror attack on a hotel in Mali’s central town of Sevare, media reported on Saturday.

credits: BBC
credits: BBC

Gunmen have taken an unknown number of people as hostages at the Byblos Hotel, which is popular with UN workers. Two of the gunmen have also been killed, BBC reported.

The UN mission in the country said it believed “a member of the international personnel” was killed in the attack on Friday in the town, about 600 km north-east of the capital Bamako, the report said.

Mali has been fighting Islamist rebels in the north for a number of years.

Officials said an operation to free the hostages was underway, the report added.

(IANS)

 

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Earth Will Reach 1.5 Degrees Above Pre-Industrial Levels By 2030

Countries in the southern hemisphere will be among the worse off.

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climate, global warming, celsisus
An aerial view of downtown San Francisco, California

The UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) on Monday said the planet will reach the crucial threshold of 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels by 2030, precipitating the risk of extreme drought, wildfires, floods and food shortages for hundreds of millions of people.

In a report, the IPCC said that governments around the world must take “rapid, far-reaching and unprecedented changes in all aspects of society” to avoid disastrous levels of global warming, CNN reported.

The date, which falls well within the lifetime of many people alive today, is based on current levels of greenhouse gas emissions.

The planet is already two-thirds of the way there, with global temperatures having warmed about 1 degree Celsius. Avoiding going even higher will require significant action in the next few years, the report said.

climate, global warming, celsisu
A fisherman stands on his boat as he fishes at the Tisma lagoon wetland park, also designated as Ramsar Site 1141 in the Convention on Wetlands, in Tisma, Nicaragua. VOA

Global net emissions of carbon dioxide would need to fall by 45 per cent from 2010 levels by 2030 and reach “net zero” around 2050 in order to keep the warming around 1.5 degrees Celsius.

Lowering emissions to this degree, while technically possible, would require widespread changes in energy, industry, buildings, transportation and cities, according to the report.

“One of the key messages that comes out very strongly from this report is that we are already seeing the consequences of 1 degree Celsius of global warming through more extreme weather, rising sea levels and diminishing Arctic sea ice, among other changes,” said Panmao Zhai, co-chair of IPCC Working Group I.

Coral reefs will also be drastically effected, with between 70 and 90 per cent expected to die off, including Australia’s Great Barrier Reef.

climate, global warming, celsisus
Waves from Hurricane Florence pound the Bogue Inlet Pier in Emerald Isle, N.C. VOA

Countries in the southern hemisphere will be among the worse off, the report said, adding “projected to experience the largest impacts on economic growth due to climate change should global warming increase”.

“Every extra bit of warming matters, especially since warming of 1.5 degrees C or higher increases the risk associated with long-lasting or irreversible changes, such as the loss of some eco-systems,” CNN quoted Hans-Otto Pörtner, Co-Chair of IPCC Working Group II, as saying.

Monday’s report is three years in the making and is a direct result of the 2015 Paris Climate Agreement.

Also Read: Paris Adopts Climate Action Plan, Aims At Achieving A ‘Zero Carbon’ Future

In the Paris accord, 197 countries agreed to the goal of holding global temperatures “well below” 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels and to pursue efforts to limit it to 1.5 degrees Celsius.

More than 90 authors from 40 countries were involved in leading the report, helped by 133 contributing authors. (IANS)