Thursday January 18, 2018

Happy Narasimha Jayanti

Narasimha Jayanti is the day when Lord Vishnu appeared in his 4th incarnation in the form of Lord Narasimha, half-lion and half-man, to kill Hiranyakashipu.

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Narasimha Jayanti is celebrated as the day when Lord Vishnu appeared in his 4th incarnation in the form of Lord Narasimha, half-lion and half-man, to kill the demon Hiranyakashipu. Occurring on Chaturdashi, Shukla Paksh in the Hindu month of Vaishakha, in 2016 Narasimha Jayanti falls on May 20.

Lord Narasimha Idol, Wikimedia Commons
Lord Narasimha Idol, Wikimedia Commons

• According to Hindu mythology, in ancient times there was a Sage named Kashyap who had two sons known as Harinyaksha and Hiranyakashipu.

• After Harinyaksha was killed by the 3rd avatar of Lord Vishnu in the form of Lord Varaha, his brother Hiranyakashipu sought revenge and undertook severe penances to please Lord Brahma.

Related article: Learn about Parshuraama Jayanti

• When Lord Brahma appeared to Hiranyakashipu and blessed him with a boon, Hiranyakashipu asked for immortality. Lord Brahma refused to grant immortality, then Hiranyakashipu asked for a series of circumstances: that he may not die indoors or outdoors, during day or night, on the ground or the sky, not by any weapon, not by any human nor any animal, not by any living or non-living entity and not by any demigod or demon.

Lord Narasimha depiction in stone, Wikimedia Commons
Lord Narasimha depiction in stone, Wikimedia Commons

• Hiranyakashipu was granted his desire, and empowered, thinking he had no rival, he established his rule on the world, even insisting that his name be offered in prayers.

The atrocities of Hiranyakashipu continued and were turned upon his son Prahalad as well, who was devoted to Lord Vishnu.

• Following multiple attempts to kill Prahalad, by poisoning him, drowning him, trampling him with elephants and having him sit in fire on the lap of Holika his sister who was blessed with a boon preventing her from being burnt by fire, Prahalad survived, his faith in Lord Vishnu intact.

Lord Narasimha appears from Pillar, Wikimedia Commons
Lord Narasimha appears from Pillar, Wikimedia Commons

• One day, Hiranyakashipu faced Prahalad and asked him about his God. Prahalad responded that his God was present everywhere and resided in everything. Hiranyakashipu then asked if his Lord Vishnu was in the pillar at the threshold of his palace. Prahalad answer yes, and an enraged Hiranyakashipu attacked the pillar, from where stepped forth Lord Vishnu in his Narasimha avtar, in the shape of half-lion, half-man.

On the threshold of the palace which was neither indoors nor outdoors, at the time of dusk which was neither day nor night, on his lap which was not the ground nor sky, Lord Narasimha who was neither human nor animal, killed Hiranyakashipu without a weapon using his nails.

Lord Narasimha, also known as Narasimhadeva and as the ‘Great Protector’ is said to defend his devotees in times of need.

Narsimha Jayanti, the day when Lord Vishnu appeared in the form of Lord Narasimha, is observed by fasting, prayers, and donations to the poor.

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  • Pritam Go Green

    History depicts the fact that god listens to those who are pure. There is so much divine power in being spiritual. We all should learn a lesson from Bhakt Prahlaad.

  • Archita aggarwal

    Go spiritual,go in the divine power…..

  • Pritam Go Green

    History depicts the fact that god listens to those who are pure. There is so much divine power in being spiritual. We all should learn a lesson from Bhakt Prahlaad.

  • Archita aggarwal

    Go spiritual,go in the divine power…..

Next Story

The Scion of Ikshvaku: A retelling of Ramayana by Amish Tripathi

The book is simple yet written nicely. It can get you engrossed right away. Everything is explained well, it is graphic enough for a reader to play it as a movie in their head.

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'The Scion of Ikshvaku' is based on Ramayana, though it deviates from the original epic. Wikipedia
'The Scion of Ikshvaku' is based on Ramayana, though it deviates from the original epic. Wikipedia
  • Amish Tripathi’s ‘The Scion of Ikshvaku’ is a retelling of Ramayana.
  • The book is a surprise to all the readers who think that it will follow the conventional story line.
  • The book has garnered good responses and has also built anticipation for the other ones in the series.

Amish Tripathi is famous for taking elements from Hindu mythology and adding his own imagination to concoct exciting and thrilling reads. His earlier books on Shiva got rave reviews. And now he’s back, and this time he is retelling us one of our favourite mythological stories. The story of Ramayana.

The first book of the Ram Chandra series by Amish Tripathi, The Scion of Ikshvaku, was released on 22 June 2015 after what seemed to be the most expensive promotional drive for a book, which even included YouTube trailers.

Akshay Kumar at the cover launch of 'The Scion of Ikshvaku.' Wikimedia Commons
Akshay Kumar at the cover launch of ‘The Scion of Ikshvaku.’ Wikimedia Commons

How much did Tripathi succeed in retelling us the story of Ramayana? 

Amish Tripathi knows how to mix mythology with his plots, but how accurate was his mythology this time around? For anyone who knows the Ramayana and expects ‘The Scion of Ikshvaku’ to be the same, must prepare themselves for a shock.

But for those who know how Amish Tripathi goes with his stories, the book will meet all their expectations, for Amish knows how to bend and create a story.

His literary style is nothing classic. Many people don’t even like it, but one cannot help but admire how Amish always manages to create new stories from old, rusty ones. He has an exceptional ability to keep the essence of mythological tales while spinning wildly deviant plots around them.

The narration in ‘The Scion of Ikshvaku’ is very good, with crisp dialogues and suspense which was aptly built up paragraph through a paragraph.

Amish builds upon the epic Rama, in a very un-Ramayana like manner (He never used the word ‘Ramayana’ which is very clever of him). The differences with the epic tale are apparent right where he lists the major characters. Ram is just another human hero and the story is devoid of any magical elements.

The first and greatest difference between the Ramayana and The Scion of Ikshvaku is the depiction of Ram as an unloved prince. His father, King Dasaratha, considers Ram inauspicious and reason for all his misfortunes. The very foundation of the epic is laid differently in the story.

Many characters surprise us we move forward with the story. For example, Manthara instead of a poor handmaiden is shown as the wealthiest businesswoman of Ayodhya in Amish’s world.

Another example is Sita, who Amish appointed as the prime minister of Mithila in his story. Ravana also only has one head in Tripathi’s version, though with a horned helmet.

Amish Tripathi, the author who knows how to bend mythology to create amazing stories. Wikimedia Commons
Amish Tripathi, the author who knows how to bend mythology to create amazing stories. Wikimedia Commons

The intrigue deepens as we read further into the story. Amish has played with this epic and has made it into a story which surprises us at every turn of event. It is nothing like we would think it would be.

Amish is unapologetic about all the changes he made in mythology and that is his USP.

The book is full of examples of Amish’s imagination, but it is for the reader to find them and judge them. The author has packed his book with all the necessary drama-action-comedy masala, the combination which always gets guaranteed success.

Honestly, the book cannot claim any literary merit, but Amish’s easy prose and page-turning style are designed to be enjoyable, not analyzable.

The book is simple yet written nicely. It can get you engrossed right away. Everything is explained well, it is graphic enough for a reader to play it as a movie in their head. This s one book which once picked up, you won’t be able to leave until it is done.