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Here are Some Tips for First Time Travelling Experience

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Travelling
Travelling. Pixabay
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New Delhi, Sep 18, 2017: Arm yourself with some handy tips to overcome barriers when you travel to unknown destinations — whether in India or overseas, say experts.

Aloke Bajpai, CEO and co-founder of travel website ixigo, suggests a few things you need to keep in mind when travelling in India if you are a foreigner:

* If you know English, then there are chances that you might survive easily. Though you can easily find English-speaking people everywhere in the country, the regional difference in the accent makes it really difficult to understand the language. Despite the language barrier, you can survive in this country by following some simple tips —

– Break your sentences into simple comprehensible parts. Make sure you carry a pen and a notepad to draw pictures or write words. Pen down all the important names and addresses before your leave your hotel. Look for locals who speak in English and record your route.

* This country is widely known for its delicious cuisine with all kinds of curries, breads, chutneys and sweets. Indian food is spicier for its foreign visitors. Also, tourists fall victim to the infamous ‘Delhi Belly’ due to the poor sanitation facilities when they travel in India.

Here is how to avoid an upset stomach —

– Eat cooked food and avoid salads or juices from any local vendors.

– Consider becoming a vegetarian while in India.

– Avoid eating too much spicy food, especially chillies.

– Wash your hands often.

– Carry probiotics that suit your body.

* Indian news channels are usually filled with news related to how one community has hurt the religious sentiments of another community. Being Indians, we might be familiar with such a thing but witnessing this might turn out to be really scary for a foreigner.

They are in constant mental dilemma on what to wear, when to cover their head, what to touch and so on.

To avoid offending anyone, you must keep these things in mind —

– Respect local dress codes.

– Take your shoes off before you enter a place of worship.

– Don’t eat or pass things from your left hand as it is considered uncouth.

– Don’t discuss religion with the locals.

– Taking a photograph of the deity in a temple is not permitted at most places.

* While wandering in India, you will come across a number of hawkers, local guides and auto-drivers who will be eager to assist you. But remember that most of them are just looking for a chance to extort some money.

– Travelling in a group is best.

– Drinking and smoking in public is offensive.

– Don’t hire taxis or auto-rickshaws from unlicensed operators.

– Never book tickets from unauthorised travel agents.

– Don’t take any offerings like ‘prasad’ from saints or godmen.

Abhishek Ranjan, Vice President, digital wallet company Paytm, has tips for people travelling overseas —

* In this digital-savvy world, we have everything we ought to know, on the internet. Yes, from tips to overcoming different barriers, visiting picture galleries, and accessing travel blogs, reviews, etc., everything is out there. So get researching and a plan will fall into place.

* Download a language and translation app like Duolingo. This would help you understand the basics and give you the much-needed confidence.

* Family, friends, colleagues, neighbours; talk to anyone who travels often and get some advice. You would not just get an idea about where to go and what to see, but they would also prepare you for scenarios that you may have to face.

* Get money exchange done before-hand and set yourself a budget. Know how much you are supposed to spend per day and stick to your plan to avoid running out of money. Also, ensure that you have international transactions activated on your debit/credit card, if travelling overseas. (IANS)

 

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Now Paralyzed Can Also Walk Due To Exoskeleton Technology

Technology helps in walking

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Patrick Wensing tests out an Ekso Bionics exoskeleton in his lab at the University of Notre Dame. He and his team are working to make the machines more intuitive.
Patrick Wensing tests out an Ekso Bionics exoskeleton in his lab at the University of Notre Dame. He and his team are working to make the machines more intuitive. VOA

An accident, a stroke, or a disease can leave someone paralyzed and unable to walk. That happens to more than 15 million people around the world each year.

But new technological advances and physical therapy could help some of them walk again.

Among the most promising is the use of robotic exoskeletons, like one made by Ekso Bionics. It looks a bit like a backpack that straps on the user’s back and around the midsection. Robotic ‘legs’ complete with foot panels extend from either side of the pack and wrap around the patient’s legs. A video game-style controller attaches to the pack with a long cord.

The EksoGT robotic exoskeleton is being used in more than 200 rehabilitation centers around the world, including Marianjoy Rehabilitation Hospital.
The EksoGT robotic exoskeleton is being used in more than 200 rehabilitation centers around the world, including Marianjoy Rehabilitation Hospital. VOA

“I’m going to be a robot!”

Lindsey Stoefen has been doing physical therapy with the exoskeleton for an hour a day, as she works to recover from the rare disorder that put her in a wheelchair in October.

The 17-year-old athlete climbed into a specially designed exoskeleton for the first time in late April, after becoming an in-patient at Marianjoy Rehabilitation Hospital in Chicago.

She recalls being nervous. “I was like ‘Dang, I’m going to be a robot!’ I was scared at first. I was like, ‘Am I going to like it? Will I be okay?’ And once I got into it, I loved it.”

Lauren Bularzik, Lindsey’s physical therapist, says the exo robots help to accelerate the rehabilitation process. “For someone who takes a lot of energy to only walk a few feet, exo can get them up, can get them moving, it can supplement their movements, get that reciprocal pattern, encourage the correct motor planning.”

Beside speeding up recovery times, these robotic skeletons are especially helpful for those with paralysis, from spinal cord injuries and strokes. Using the machine can help some patients rewire their brains to use secondary muscles, so they can eventually walk again – without the device.

The downside

Scientists at the University of Notre Dame are leading the way with their work on wearable robots that allow patients to regain some or all of their mobility. But Patrick Wensing, assistant professor of mechanical engineering, says exoskeletons have one big drawback.

Bionic exoskeleton helps wheelchair users stand and walk
Bionic exoskeleton helps wheelchair users stand and walk. Flickr

“While existing exoskeletons are very powerful, they don’t understand what the user wants to do. So in order to transition between activities in daily life, you often have to press a button interface to tell the exoskeleton ‘I would like to stand up now.’”

Wensing and his team are collaborating with Ekso Bionics, a leading developer of wearable robots, to create a machine that can understand what its user wants to do without implanted sensors and complicated control panels.

The new three-year project funded by The National Science Foundation’s robotic initiative, hopes to achieve a more fluid, intuitive system.

Taylor Gambon has spent the last year analyzing data from exoskeleton users and comparing them to models of everyday walking. “What we’re seeing is that slow walking in general, whether in the exoskeleton or just the human, is much different from walking at a speed that you would choose naturally.”

Also read: Heart patients who walk faster hospitalised less

Later this year, the team will travel to Ekso Bionics’ California headquarters, where they will work directly with exoskeletons to design programs that interact with users of various disabilities, so that more people like Lindsey Stoefen can get back on their feet again. (VOA)