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High-intensity Aerobic Exercise likely to Reverse Aging: Researchers

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A new study suggests high-intensity aerobic exercise may reverse aging. (Photo by Flickr user Global Panorama via Creative Commons License) VOA
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March 13, 2017: The good news is that researchers say they have found a way that may reverse aging for older people. The bad news is you are going to have to hit the gym for some high-intensity aerobic training to do it.

For the study, researchers from the Mayo Clinic compared three types of exercise: high-intensity interval training, resistance training and a combination of the two. They found that only high-intensity interval training and combined training “improved aerobic capacity and mitochondrial function for skeletal muscle,” with mitochondrial function being a common problem for older adults.

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“We encourage everyone to exercise regularly, but the take-home message for aging adults that supervised high-intensity training is probably best, because, both metabolically and at the molecular level, it confers the most benefits,” saysK. Sreekumaran Nair, M.D., Ph.D., a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist and senior researcher on the study.

He added that high-intensity training appears to reverse some aspects of aging and warned that resistance training is also important for increasing muscle strength, suggesting hitting the weights “a couple of days a week.”

Specifically, researchers found that high-intensity interval training reversed aging by improving muscle protein content, which improved “energetic functions” and caused muscle enlargement in older adults.

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It also improved cells’ ability to make new proteins, which reverses a “major adverse effect of aging.”

The study monitored older and younger adults who were divided into groups to do each of the three types of exercise over 12 weeks. Researchers then gathered health information 72 hours after participants completed a type of exercise.

The findings were published in the journal Cell Metabolism. (VOA)

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Poor Aerobic Fitness Increases Risk of Diabetes in Kids

Their aerobic fitness was determined by measuring peak oxygen uptake during a maximal exercise test

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Diabetes
98 mn Indians will have diabetes by 2030: Lancet. Pixabay

Lack of exercise, particularly poor aerobic fitness, in children increases their risk for developing Type-2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, says a new study.

Children with poor aerobic fitness in proportion to their total body mass were found to have a significantly higher risk of Type-2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease than their peers having better aerobic fitness.

“Measures of aerobic fitness that are based on total body mass are better at predicting the risk of Type-2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease than measures that are based on skeletal muscle mass,” said Andrew Agbaje, lead researcher from the University of Eastern Finland.

“However, they exaggerate the role of aerobic fitness in children’s health,” he added.

For the study, researchers determined threshold values of aerobic fitness for 352 children, aged between 9 and 11 who are at an increased risk of Type-2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

Diabetes
Representational image. Pixabay

Their aerobic fitness was determined by measuring peak oxygen uptake during a maximal exercise test.

The team also calculated variables indicative of the risk of Type-2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, such as waist circumference, blood levels of insulin, glucose, HDL cholesterol, and triglycerides as well as blood pressure.

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The study, published in the journal Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports, found that the traditional way of expressing aerobic fitness in proportion to total body mass overestimates the role of aerobic fitness in identifying children at an increased risk of these diseases.

“We should be cautious when interpreting aerobic fitness measures that are proportioned to total body mass in order to correctly identify children who truly need health and lifestyle intervention,” Agbaje noted. (IANS)