Saturday January 25, 2020

High Level Of Insulin in Infants May Rise Chances Of Brain Damage

"One of the problems facing clinicians is that it's really difficult to predict which babies will have problems after surgical treatment," said Karen Cosgrove, from the varsity.

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Spreading focal lesions are generally larger and spread outwards into areas of healthy cells, while isolated focal lesions, have a capsule around them that keeps the diseased cells separate from healthy cells. Pixabay

Babies born with abnormally high levels of insulin are at the risk of suffering permanent brain damage and life-long disability, finds a study that showed it’s possible to predict when and how the condition may affect the child in the long-term.

The generally rare condition, called congenital hyperinsulinism, can also be as common as cystic fibrosis in children born into communities where cousins marry.

So far, scientists understood that there were two main subtypes of the disease known as diffuse — affects the entire pancreas — and focal — affects just one area of the organ.

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In contrast, in infants with isolated lesions, the disease was diagnosed later and surgery to remove the lesion was less complicated. Pixabay

In contrast, in infants with isolated lesions, the disease was diagnosed later and surgery to remove the lesion was less complicated.

The new study, led by a team from the University of Manchester in the UK, showed that focal CHI can be further categorised into two types — spreading focal lesions and isolated focal lesions.

Spreading focal lesions are generally larger and spread outwards into areas of healthy cells, while isolated focal lesions, have a capsule around them that keeps the diseased cells separate from healthy cells.

For the study, published in the Frontiers in Endocrinology journal, the team investigated the cases of 25 infants with focal CHI to see how the two types of lesions influenced their long-term outcomes.

They found babies with spreading focal lesions suffered more severely from the disease and were diagnosed earlier. These infants were more likely to suffer brain damage, which permanently affected their development, learning and behaviour.

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The generally rare condition, called congenital hyperinsulinism, can also be as common as cystic fibrosis in children born into communities where cousins marry. Pixabay

In contrast, in infants with isolated lesions, the disease was diagnosed later and surgery to remove the lesion was less complicated.

These data help to explain why newborn babies diagnosed with the same disease may go on to have very different outcomes and could influence the way clinicians choose to manage each new case of CHI.

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“One of the problems facing clinicians is that it’s really difficult to predict which babies will have problems after surgical treatment,” said Karen Cosgrove, from the varsity.

“Our data gives some important clues that will help clinicians to know how much extra care each baby is likely to need,” Cosgrove said. (IANS)

 

 

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Mothers Find Gaps in Accessibility of Breastfeeding Resources at Work: Research

Mothers still face barriers to breastfeed at work

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The study, published in the journal Workplace Health & Safety also revealed gaps in the quality and accessibility of breastfeeding resources in the eyes of working mothers. Pixabay

Despite the protections in place to support breastfeeding for employees, the burden still falls on working mothers to advocate for the resources they need, says a new health research.

The study, published in the journal Workplace Health & Safety also revealed gaps in the quality and accessibility of breastfeeding resources in the eyes of working mothers.

“We know that there are benefits of breastfeeding for both the mother and the infant, and we know that returning to work is a significant challenge for breastfeeding continuation,” said study lead author Rachel McCardel from University of Georgia in US.

“There is a collective experience that we wanted to explore and learn how can we make this better,” McCardel added.

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Returning to work is a significant challenge for breastfeeding continuation. Pixabay

For the findings, research team specifically wanted to better understand breastfeed support in the workplace since US federal guidelines went into place over a decade ago requiring employers to provide unpaid break time and a space other than a restroom for employees to be able to express breast milk.

For their study, the research team surveyed female employees who performed a variety of jobs.

In addition to asking questions about their access to breast feed resources like private rooms, breast pumps and lactation consultants, the respondents were also asked about their experiences with combining breastfeeding and work.

They found that most respondents, nearly 80 per cent, had a private space at work to express milk, and around two-thirds of the women reported having break times to breastfeed.

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Access to other resources like lactation consultants or breast pumps was less common.

According to the study, many respondents also said they hadn’t expected to get much help from their employers, and there was a general lack of communication about the resources available to them. (IANS)