Thursday February 21, 2019
Home Indian Diaspora Hindu Student...

Hindu Students Council to organize “Global Dharma Conference”

0
//
'2'_Dharma_Wheel,_The_Wheel_of_Life_at_Sun_Temple_Konark,_Orissa_India_February_2014

 

By Nithin Sridhar

 

New Jersey: Around three thousand people from twenty countries including many renowned leaders, speakers, religious monks, and artists are expected to attend a 3-day Global Dharma Conference (GDC) from 11-13 September, 2015, to explore the relevance of Dharma for the Self and for the society.

 

The theme of the conference is to “reconnect with the roots, rejuvenate the inner Self and realize the applications of Dharma”. The conference is being organized by Hindu Students Council (HSC).

 

In a press release by HSC, Nikunj Trivedi, Chairman of the Board of Trustees said, “the Conference aims to explore and understand the multifaceted applications of Dharma for the Self as well as for the society and the world, whether through Yoga or the invaluable teachings of Vedas and Vedanta.” The release further states that the Conference will “focus on the universality of Dharma and its relevance to modern life, going beyond just religion.”

 

HSC is the largest non-profit Hindu students’ organization in the United States and Canada. It was founded in 1990 and currently has 50 college chapters. It serves as a youth forum that promotes Hindu culture and heritage through various activities.

 

Previously, GDC was successfully conducted in 2003 in which around 2000 people from 20 countries and 70 universities had participated including over 60 renowned scientists, literary and religious figures, and dignitaries from various backgrounds like science, economics, environment etc.

 

The event had seen participation from Former President of India Late Dr. Abdul Kalam, Jagadguru Shankaracharya of Kanchi, Swami Dayananda Saraswati, and Deepak Chopra among others.

 

Dharma-conference-flyer2 - Copy
Flyer released by http://dharmaconference.com/

 

The list of speakers for 2015 event includes Sri Sri Ravi Shankar of Art of Living, Swami Dayananda Saraswati of Arsha Vidya Gurukulam, Indian-American writer Rajiv Malhotra, Dr. H.R. Nagendra- chairman of Task Force of AYUSH (Government of India), Dr. David Frawley- a well-known teacher of Hinduism and many others.

 

Swami Paramatmananda Saraswati, the founder of Arsha Vidya Mandir, is scheduled to deliver a plenary welcome address on opening day (11 September) of the conference. A keynote speech by Rajiv Malhotra and David Frawley, along with Bharatnatyam performance by Pavithra Srinivasan is scheduled for the day.

 

The events of 12 September are scheduled to begin with a Yoga and Pranayama workshop. The day’s sessions include a live video conference with Sri Sri Ravi Shankar and a panel discussion on “Reconnecting Yoga to its Roots” with H R Nagendra and others. Various other sessions on topic of Dharma are scheduled for the whole day. The day is planned to end with a dramatic Balinese dance performance on the theme “The Victory of Dharma: Rama Defeats Ravana”, a Kathak dance performance and a classical music performance.

 

The final day of the conference will include a video message from Swami Dayananda Saraswati, panel discussions on topics like “Youth Perspectives on the Relevance of Dharma”, “Unity of Dharma – Hindu, Buddhist, Jain, and Sikh Traditions,” and “Hindu Dharma: Global Influences and Practices”.

 

The GDC will be held at New Jersey Convention and Exposition Center at Edison, New Jersey. The HSC is also organizing a fundraiser banquet at Royal Albert’s Palace, 1050 King Georges Post Road, Fords, NJ 08863.

 

According to HSC, those who wish to attend the conference must visit their website and register. The registration fee for registering on or before 11 August is $55 for college/grad students and $100 for non-students. If one wants to register after 11 August till 10 September, the charges will be is $85 for college/grad students and $135 for non-students.

Next Story

HPV Vaccination May Bring An End To Cervical Cancer In India by 2070

Combining high uptake of the HPV vaccine and cervical screening could eliminate cervical cancer as a public health hazard in 149 out of 181 countries by 2100 and up to 13 million cases of cervical cancer by 2050.

0
cancer
Cervical cancer is the fourth-most common cancer among women, with an estimated 570,000 new cases diagnosed worldwide in 2018, of which around 85 per cent occur in less developed nations. Pixabay

Human papillomavirus (HPV) screening and vaccination must be taken up on a war footing in countries like India to prevent 15 million cervical cancer deaths among women by 2050, a Lancet research said.

Causing the second-highest number of deaths among Indian women among cancer variants, cervical cancer, in a majority of cases, is caused by HPV, a group of more than 150 viruses.

The efforts might even result in cervical cancer being eliminated as a public health hazard in India by 2070-79, according to the study, published in The Lancet Oncology journal.

Combining high uptake of the HPV vaccine and cervical screening could eliminate cervical cancer as a public health hazard in 149 out of 181 countries by 2100 and up to 13 million cases of cervical cancer by 2050.

Cancer
“Awareness about cervical cancer is extremely poor among common people; that makes containing the disease a challenge,” Anjila Aneja, Director at Fortis La Femme, New Delhi, told IANS. Pixabay

If the high coverage of HPV vaccination and cervical screening cannot be achieved globally, over 44 million women could be diagnosed with cervical cancer in the next 50 years with two-thirds of these cases and an additional estimated 15 million deaths, would occur in countries with low and medium levels of development.

“More than two thirds of cases prevented would be in countries with low and medium levels of human development like India, Nigeria, and Malawi, where there has so far been limited access to HPV vaccination or cervical screening,” said lead author Professor Karen Canfell from the Cancer Council New South Wales in Australia.

However, large disparities exist in cervical screening and HPV vaccination coverage among countries.

“Awareness about cervical cancer is extremely poor among common people; that makes containing the disease a challenge,” Anjila Aneja, Director at Fortis La Femme, New Delhi, told IANS.

“While societal barriers prevent women from seeking medical help in advance, women are forced to come out at a later stage when the disease has reached an advanced stage,” she said.

cancer
Screening and broad-spectrum HPV vaccines could potentially prevent up to 84-90 per cent of cervical cancers, the study said. Pixabay

However, Canfell says that despite the enormity of the problem, their findings suggest that “global elimination is within reach with tools that are already available, provided that both high coverage of HPV vaccination and cervical screening can be achieved.

Cervical cancer is the fourth-most common cancer among women, with an estimated 570,000 new cases diagnosed worldwide in 2018, of which around 85 per cent occur in less developed nations.

Screening and broad-spectrum HPV vaccines could potentially prevent up to 84-90 per cent of cervical cancers, the study said.

Also Read: Indian IT Act Silent On Social Media’s Manipulative Role
“Diagnostic tests such as the pap smear are effective in identifying cancerous tendencies.

“However, these tests are available with a limited number of providers and largely within the cities. This makes screening sporadic and leaves out women who live in rural areas,” Aneja added. (IANS)