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Hindu Students Council to organize “Global Dharma Conference”

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'2'_Dharma_Wheel,_The_Wheel_of_Life_at_Sun_Temple_Konark,_Orissa_India_February_2014

 

By Nithin Sridhar

 

New Jersey: Around three thousand people from twenty countries including many renowned leaders, speakers, religious monks, and artists are expected to attend a 3-day Global Dharma Conference (GDC) from 11-13 September, 2015, to explore the relevance of Dharma for the Self and for the society.

 

The theme of the conference is to “reconnect with the roots, rejuvenate the inner Self and realize the applications of Dharma”. The conference is being organized by Hindu Students Council (HSC).

 

In a press release by HSC, Nikunj Trivedi, Chairman of the Board of Trustees said, “the Conference aims to explore and understand the multifaceted applications of Dharma for the Self as well as for the society and the world, whether through Yoga or the invaluable teachings of Vedas and Vedanta.” The release further states that the Conference will “focus on the universality of Dharma and its relevance to modern life, going beyond just religion.”

 

HSC is the largest non-profit Hindu students’ organization in the United States and Canada. It was founded in 1990 and currently has 50 college chapters. It serves as a youth forum that promotes Hindu culture and heritage through various activities.

 

Previously, GDC was successfully conducted in 2003 in which around 2000 people from 20 countries and 70 universities had participated including over 60 renowned scientists, literary and religious figures, and dignitaries from various backgrounds like science, economics, environment etc.

 

The event had seen participation from Former President of India Late Dr. Abdul Kalam, Jagadguru Shankaracharya of Kanchi, Swami Dayananda Saraswati, and Deepak Chopra among others.

 

Dharma-conference-flyer2 - Copy
Flyer released by http://dharmaconference.com/

 

The list of speakers for 2015 event includes Sri Sri Ravi Shankar of Art of Living, Swami Dayananda Saraswati of Arsha Vidya Gurukulam, Indian-American writer Rajiv Malhotra, Dr. H.R. Nagendra- chairman of Task Force of AYUSH (Government of India), Dr. David Frawley- a well-known teacher of Hinduism and many others.

 

Swami Paramatmananda Saraswati, the founder of Arsha Vidya Mandir, is scheduled to deliver a plenary welcome address on opening day (11 September) of the conference. A keynote speech by Rajiv Malhotra and David Frawley, along with Bharatnatyam performance by Pavithra Srinivasan is scheduled for the day.

 

The events of 12 September are scheduled to begin with a Yoga and Pranayama workshop. The day’s sessions include a live video conference with Sri Sri Ravi Shankar and a panel discussion on “Reconnecting Yoga to its Roots” with H R Nagendra and others. Various other sessions on topic of Dharma are scheduled for the whole day. The day is planned to end with a dramatic Balinese dance performance on the theme “The Victory of Dharma: Rama Defeats Ravana”, a Kathak dance performance and a classical music performance.

 

The final day of the conference will include a video message from Swami Dayananda Saraswati, panel discussions on topics like “Youth Perspectives on the Relevance of Dharma”, “Unity of Dharma – Hindu, Buddhist, Jain, and Sikh Traditions,” and “Hindu Dharma: Global Influences and Practices”.

 

The GDC will be held at New Jersey Convention and Exposition Center at Edison, New Jersey. The HSC is also organizing a fundraiser banquet at Royal Albert’s Palace, 1050 King Georges Post Road, Fords, NJ 08863.

 

According to HSC, those who wish to attend the conference must visit their website and register. The registration fee for registering on or before 11 August is $55 for college/grad students and $100 for non-students. If one wants to register after 11 August till 10 September, the charges will be is $85 for college/grad students and $135 for non-students.

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Top Investment Options for Beginners in India

The most important thing that guarantees high returns on your assiduous earnings is safety

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Time and Money
"Money can't buy happiness". A group of researchers believes the opposite with scientific backing. Pixabay

Investing your savings is a good idea. You just cannot keep saving money because of two main reasons.

Firstly, the savings will not grow. Most of the times they stay the same unless you count the nominal savings account your bank keeps adding half-yearly or yearly. Secondly, some need or the other arises, and you will be inclined to spend the money out of your savings than going for a loan.

We cannot stop some need. Now and then, some appliance in your house needs a repair or replacement, same goes good with your vehicles, kids, spouse and so on.

So locking away your savings so that you will not use them at convenience and letting them grow in the meanwhile is a good strategy.

Only if you knew how, when and where?

Most of us are good at working hard, slogging it out and earning the few extra bucks, but when it comes to investing and make money grow, we have neither the expertise nor the time for it.

As the famous billionaire and investor, Warren Buffet put it – “Unless you are making money while you are sleeping, you will keep working till you die”.

Safety First

Let us explore some of the investment options for people who are planning to invest.

  1. Public Provident Fund (PPF)

For a change, the Public provident fund or PPF as it is more popularly known as needs no introduction. Every employee working in a limited company or a governmental organization knows of this.

PPF is also one of the main reasons behind most of the Indians growing lazy and not trying to look for other investment options unless your wall in the above average or the top bracket. At an interest rate of 7.9% and dual contribution from the employee and the employer, PPF is the lifeline for all employees, especially if they keep contributing until retirement without withdrawing.

There is a facility to withdraw the money if you are jobless for a particular time or you can even avail three-year loans. However, mostly PPF is looked at as a post-retirement benefit than an investment option during your working years.

But an investment nonetheless.

You can save anywhere between ₹ 500 to ₹ 1.5 lakhs a year, and we all know why it is the favorite – These savings exempt from tax, However, if you choose to invest more than ₹ 1.5 lakhs a year in your PPF, the excess amount will neither earn interest or tax benefits. Minimum lock-in period is 15 years.

Fixed Deposit Scheme, India
Fixed Deposits are one of the more common and preferable investment schemes in India. Pixabay
  1. National Savings Certificate (NSC)

At an interest rate of 8% per annum, backed by the Government of India and the convenience of obtaining one (your nearby post office), a National savings certificate or an NSC can be not ignored.

Though it has a minimum lock-in period of 5 years, (the other option is 10-year lock-in period), the guaranteed good yields make it a preferred investment option by quite a few. But this is also the most ignored option by many for some reason.

Investment up to ₹ 1.5 lakhs is exempted from tax. The interest rate is revised quarterly, and the amount is compounded annually.

Another advantage is that the investments in NSC are accepted as collaterals by many banks and NBFCs (non-banking finance corporations). However, you cannot touch your amount for a minimum period of 5 years.

  1. Equity Linked Saving Scheme (ELSS)

Shorter lock-in periods and high-interest rates are the USP of the equity-linked saving schemes (ELSS).

In the ELSS, the minimum lock-in period is three years, and you can choose to make your earnings as regular dividends through the three years or receive a lump sum at once after your lock-in period ends. Therefore, this is a plan that lets you draw the amount within your investment period and gives you a chance to earn more than the rest – 15-18% returns. A near 11% interest offered by NPS (the national pension scheme) is a distant second. In addition, you do not need to invest the entire amount at once. You have an option called SIPs (systematic investment plans) by way of which you can invest as low as ₹ 500 a month.

Investments up to ₹ 1.5 lakhs are exempt from taxation, but returns are taxable. The LTCG or long-term capital gains from ELSS are taxable if they are above ₹ 1 lakh.

There is a fair amount of risk involved, and your investment may not end profitable every time. However, you can take the help of fund managers (or mutual funds) and play it safe.

  1. Recurring and Fixed deposits

Most of the nationalized and private banks offer you this facility at different interest rates and deposit lock-in periods.

In a fixed deposit (FD) scheme, you make a deposit lump sum, which will mature at the end of the pre-determined period, and if you do not have the capital to start with, you can choose a recurring deposit (RD), where you can add a fixed amount every month, which can be withdrawn at the end of the maturity period.

The interest earned with a recurring deposit may be less than that of a fixed deposit, but in case of an RD, you are creating an investment with your savings. Not all of us may have the luxury of investing a lakh or five lakh rupees to start with.

Again, investments up until ₹ 1.5 lakhs in 5 years fixed deposits are exempt from taxation, but returns are taxable. Recurring deposits and fixed deposits for a period of less than five years are not exempt from income tax.

  1. National Pension Scheme (NPS)

Many, after the introduction of 2-tier system, look upon another government-backed scheme, NPS, as a useful option.

Under the Tier I NPS, one has to contribute a minimum of ₹ 6,000 per year to keep the account active. The money cannot be withdrawn till you reach 60 years of age (partial withdrawal allowed in exceptional cases) and if you choose to exit the scheme mid-way, 80% of your savings have to be invested in an annuity plan (which will be returned to you as monthly pension payments after retirement).

The Tier II NPS is a non-retirement scheme, which is more like a savings account and allows you to withdraw money when you want. There is no lock-in period, but government employees can avail tax exemption if they lock-in their savings for a minimum period of 3 years. You need to have an active Tier I account to open a Tier II account. However, this scheme is not looked at as a long-term investment due to certain limits on investments, as you cannot invest more than 50% of your savings in stock markets, etc.

Interest rates are high at 12-14% and investments up to ₹ 1.5 lakhs a year and an additional ₹ 50,000 per year can be exempted under subsection 80 CCD.

Also Read: Online Games: What Risks Do They Pose To Children?

Though there are many more private and non-governmental schemes whit flexible options which offer you a lot of conveniences and promise higher returns, it is always wise to think about safety first when it comes to investments.

It is hard-earned money, and we cannot earn it again. So, it is always safer and wiser to go with a trustworthy scheme which may offer fewer returns than a fancy scheme which gives you a lot more.

The most important thing that guarantees high returns on your assiduous earnings is safety.