Monday February 26, 2018

Hinduism is about love, unity, not divisive ideas: Author Mani Rao

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New Delhi: With attacks by fringe Hindu outfits on writers and intellectuals for their views and assaults and murders of those with different religious and cultural practices, author Mani Rao, who has done extensive research on Hindu holy scriptures and classical texts, says Hinduism is about “love and unity” and not “divisive ideas”.

Speaking about her recent book “Bhagavad Gita” (Fingerprint, Rs.250, 176 pp), a translation of the Gita in the present day context , Rao said the current day’s “intolerance” needs many more people – and not just writers – to speak up against it.

“We seem to have sunk to a new low in intolerance; it does seem specifically ideological but is (in reality) religion-misunderstood. Those who believe in a Hinduism that is based on love must speak up against these divisive ideas,” Rao told IANS in an interview.

“‘Pundits see unity in all: a humble scholar priest, a cow, an elephant, a dog and a dog-cooking person,'” Rao repeated a line from the Gita as she spoke of the intolerance in society.

Rao should know what she is talking about because otherwise she would not have been able to tweak the Bhagavad Gita in the manner she has. The sacred scripture, as translated by a majority of authors, takes a masculine line, and some even say “women are of a lower birth”. But not so for Rao, whose translation has a ‘she’ and ‘her’ – and adds a feminist perspective to the text.

“When we read an ancient text, we must be aware of the change of context and adjust our understanding. This is why I use ‘she’ and ‘her’ in my Gita instead of ‘he’ and ‘him’ – I am Arjuna, and I am a woman. My Gita cannot ignore the fact that I live in today,” Rao told IANS.

With a scripture like the Gita, considered the holiest, many translators, she said, are wary of adding or deleting even a word. “For instance, the style is different in Kalidasa’s Meghadutam and Raghuvamsham. But most translators will translate both these works in the same style!”

Studying previous translations, she could not help but feel that “the Gita’s status as a holy book has held back the translator’s hand, making him hesitant to delete even a rhetorical space filler such as ‘indeed’,” Rao notes in her book.

Having read many classical texts, there are no “authoritative texts”, and no text has dictated what people should or should not do, Rao said, when asked about the current day debate Hindu outfits raised that “Vedas ordered killing of sinners who killed cows”.

“In fact we do not have authoritative texts that dictate what people should do, we have always been a culture of dialogue … there are many contradictions in our vedas and shastras, and hence are interpreted by the ‘Apta purushas’ or wise people,” she told IANS.

In a country with a long history, “how can one make sweeping statements about what was or was not done by all of Indian society” across thousands of years, Rao questioned.

Asked how relevant the Gita, which elaborates on Brahminical concepts like Dharma, is in today’s world, Rao said: “It is possible to pick out one shloka from one part of the text and use it in a debate against another shloka. But it must be read as a whole, and not just one part of it followed, for that will be distortion,” Rao said.

Being a poet herself, Rao has also translated some of Kalidasa’s works, apart from the Gita. But a translation can never be denuded of the interpretations that the author adds to the book, she said.

“No translation is devoid of interpretation, especially for a text that discusses so much philosophy. There were many challenges while writing – terms are not easy to translate; previous translations and commentaries contradict each other sometimes,” said Rao about the process involved.

(Bhavana Akella, IANS)

 

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In Pakistan, Hindus don’t get even a ‘Crematorium:’ Will you believe that?

There are a lot of Hindu family residing all over Pakistan and still, there are very few cremation grounds where their last rites can be performed in that area

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Not having a crematorium in Peshawar is just one of the woes that the minority communities are facing since long. Wikimedia Commons
Not having a crematorium in Peshawar is just one of the woes that the minority communities are facing since long. Wikimedia Commons
  • Due to the lack of cremation grounds, some Hindus and Sikhs travel hundreds of kilometres just to perform the last rites as per their religious practices
  • As per reports, there were about 12 cremation grounds before Independence
  • Unfortunately, Hindu’s and Sikh’s have to face the same problem in the neighbouring state as well, that is Afghanistan

Death is said to be a great leveller. But the tragedy struck to some section of society in Muslim-dominated Pakistan is altogether different.

Due to the lack of cremation grounds, some Hindus and Sikhs travel hundreds of kilometres just to perform the last rites as per their religious practices. People who can’t even afford to travel, they have no option but to bury the mortal remains of their near and dear ones.

As per reports, there were about 12 cremation grounds before Independence. But with the passage of time, they vanished in the thin air of the terror-torn nation. Even in areas lying in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, where about 35,000 Hindus and Sikhs live, the cremation grounds are also rare.

Also Read: Today’s Social Issues and their Answers to Children

The law of the land is non-existent for the minorities communities like Hindu’s and Sikh’s. Without taking no-objection certificate, people from these communities can’t move an inch even. The grief-stricken families have to wait for the clearances, as they are left with no other option.

People are forced to travel long distances to cremate their relatives from the areas like Swat Bannu, Kohat, Malakand etc. The cost to travel such long distances ranges from Rs 40,000 to Rs 70,000 and on the top of it, the fear of robbery during these travels cannot be ruled out. Not all the Hindu families can afford to perform the last rites in the manner they want.

Unfortunately, Hindu’s and Sikh’s have to face the same problem in the neighbouring state as well, that is Afghanistan. The minority communities are compelled to bury the dead because cremation grounds are vanishing fast in Pakistan.

Although, Pakistan boats that the minority communities enjoy equal rights in their country, the ground reality seems to be completely different. Wikimedia Commons
Although, Pakistan boats that the minority communities enjoy equal rights in their country, the ground reality seems to be completely different. Wikimedia Commons

Although, the administration of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa has allowed the minorities communities to perform cremation near temples. But most of the temples are built on the agricultural lands and commercial areas, which have already been encroached upon by land mafia.

There are a lot of Hindu family residing in the Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa and still, there are very few cremation grounds where their last rites can be performed in that area.

Although, Pakistan boats that the minority communities enjoy equal rights in their country, the ground reality seems to be completely different. Not having a crematorium in Peshawar is just one of the woes that the minority communities are facing since long.


After much of the protests, finally, the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa government has started building the facility from the chief minister’s fund, as per some government sources.

There are almost 50,000 Sikhs and Hindus in Peshawar. And unfortunately, due to lack of proper facilities, people over there are also facing the same situation what others are facing in areas like Khyber Pakhtunkhwa.

Also Read: 7 new-age social issues in India that need a check

To expect some kind of generosity from the war-torn state like Pakistan is out of the way. Instead of spending extravagantly on the military expansion, Pakistan should come forward and full-fill the basic amenities for the citizen of its country. It’s the people who make the country and not the other way round.