Tuesday November 19, 2019

Hip and Knee Steroid Injections can be Harmful

Commonly given hip and knee steroid intra-articular injections may be harmful to some patients

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Study says, Commonly given hip and knee steroid intra-articular injections may be harmful to some patients with at-risk conditions. Pixabay

Commonly given hip and knee steroid intra-articular injections may be harmful to some patients with at-risk conditions, according to a new study.

Corticosteroid injections are often given to reduce pain and inflammation from osteoarthritis.

Researchers from Boston University have found accelerated arthritis and joint destruction can be the unintended result of intra-articular corticosteroid injections.

“We are now seeing that these injections can be very harmful to the joints with serious complications such as osteonecrosis, subchondral insufficiency fracture and rapid progressive osteoarthritis,” said study author Ali Guermazi, Professor at Boston University .

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Accelerated arthritis and joint destruction can be the unintended result of intra-articular cortico Steroid injections. Pixabay

“Intra-articular corticosteroid injection should be seriously discussed for pros and cons. Critical considerations about the complications should be part of the patient consent which is currently not the case right now,” he added.

Osteoarthritis of the hip and knee is among the most common joint disorders.

A frequently performed treatment for osteoarthritis and other joint related pain syndromes are intra-articular corticosteroid injections, yet there is conflicting evidence on their potential benefit.

For the study published in the journal Radiology, the researchers conducted a search on patients they had injected in the hips and knees during 2018.

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Cortico Steroid injections are often given to reduce pain and inflammation from osteoarthritis. Pixabay

They found that eight per cent had complications, with 10 per cent in the hips and four per cent in the knees.

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The researchers also suggest that the radiologic community should actively engage in high-quality research on this topic to better understand potential at-risk conditions prior to intervention, and to better understand potential adverse joint events following these procedures to avoid possible complications. (IANS)

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Report: Express Grieving Conditions for Sanitation Workers in Developing Countries

Authors of the report say sanitation workers in developing countries largely operate in the informal sector

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Developing Countries
Sanitation workers are the people who work in jobs such as cleaning toilets, emptying pits and septic tanks, cleaning sewage and manholes and operating pumping stations and treatment plants, but their Condition is not good in Developing Countries. Wikimedia Commons

A new report by leading health and safety agencies finds millions of sanitation workers in Developing Countries are forced to work under horrific conditions that put their health and lives at risk.

Sanitation workers everywhere occupy the lowest rung of society and are stigmatized and marginalized because they do the dirty work that other people do not want to do.

The report’s authors – the International Labor Organization, the World Health Organization, the World Bank and Water Aid – say they hope to raise awareness on the plight of sanitation workers and the dehumanizing conditions under which they are forced to work. For example, the report says that many sanitation workers aren’t given the safety training or equipment needed to protect them when handling effluent or fecal sludge.

World Health Organization spokesman Christian Lindmeier says sanitation workers make an important contribution to public health at the risk of their own lives. Poor sanitation, he says, causes more than 430,000 deaths from diarrhea every year and is linked to the spread of other diseases such as cholera, dysentery, typhoid, hepatitis A and polio.

“Sanitation workers are the people who work in jobs such as cleaning toilets, emptying pits and septic tanks, cleaning sewage and manholes and operating pumping stations and treatment plants.… Waste must be correctly treated before being disposed of or used. However, workers often come into direct contact with human waste, working with no equipment or no protection to remove it by hand which exposes them to a long list of health hazards and diseases,” Lindmeier said.

Developing Countries
A new report by leading health and safety agencies finds millions of Sanitation Workers in Developing Countries are forced to work under horrific conditions that put their health and lives at risk. VOA

Authors of the report say sanitation workers in developing countries largely operate in the informal sector. They labor under abusive conditions, have no rights or social protections and are poorly paid.

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The study calls on countries to rectify these wrongs. It urges governments to enact laws and regulations that improve working conditions for sanitation workers and protect their safety and health. It says sanitation workers must be given the equipment and training necessary for the safe, proper disposal of waste. (VOA)