Wednesday December 13, 2017
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History behind Nike’s famous slogan: ‘Just do it’ were the last words of a convicted killer

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just-do-it-hed-2013

By Newsgram Staff Writer

Just what would you do, if you heard these words, ‘ Just do it?’ Run for 5 miles? Shoot a perfect 3 pointer? Send the ball flying into the goal post?

Nike`s tagline does have a burning motivation in it, which seems to bring that last ounce of energy into the circuit. But it also has a desperation to it, a last minute call to get over whatever one is stuck with. And if one can connect with Nike’s raw appeal to athletic emotions, it is because it actually comes from a person who was facing a just-do-it-and-get-it-over-with situation in his life.

The tagline takes its inspiration from the last words of Utah killer Gary Gilmore, who was sentenced to death in 1977 for robbery and murder, the Independent reported.

“We came up with five different 30 second spots. The night before [a meeting with Nike] I got concerned because… there wasn’t an overlying sensibility to them all. Some were funny, some were solemn. So I thought…’we need a tagline to pull this stuff together’,” the Independent quoted Dan Wieden, the guy who came up with the adrenaline releasing mantra of Nike, from Dezeen magazine.

Dan Wieden must have felt the desperation behind the words, ‘Let’s do this’ as he remembered Gary Gilmore shouting them at the firing squad during his execution, and realized how similar they were to a coach’s call for motivation before he submitted his pitch with a slightly altered tagline, ‘Just do it.’

 

 

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NASA inches closer to send World’s most powerful Rocket to Mars

The two-minute, full-duration ground qualification test provided NASA with critical data on 82 qualification objectives that will support certification of the booster for flight

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NASA Rocket Test. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons
  • NASA successfully fire-tested a booster at Orbital ATK’s test facilities in Promontory, Utah 
  • In March 2015, it has successfully completed the first full-scale booster qualification ground test
  • When completed, two five-segment boosters and four RS-25 main engines will power SLS on deep space missions

WASHINGTON: NASA successfully fire-tested a booster at Orbital ATK’s test facilities in Promontory, Utah for Space Launch System (SLS). The test was done in wake of sending most powerful rocket to Mars on Tuesday.

This was the last full-scale test for the booster before SLS is ready in 2018 for the first uncrewed test flight with NASA’s Orion spacecraft, marking a key milestone on the agency’s Journey to Red Planet.

“This final qualification test of the booster system shows real progress in the development of the Space Launch System,” said William Gerstenmaier, associate administrator for the Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate at NASA headquarters in Washington, DC.

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“Seeing this test today, and experiencing the sound and feel of approximately 3.6 million pounds of thrust, helps us appreciate the progress we’re making to advance human exploration and open new frontiers for science and technology missions in deep space,” he added in a statement.

The two-minute, full-duration ground qualification test provided NASA with critical data on 82 qualification objectives that will support certification of the booster for flight.

Engineers now will evaluate test data captured by more than 530 instrumentation channels on the booster.

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When completed, two five-segment boosters and four RS-25 main engines will power SLS on deep space missions.

 Planet Mars. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons
Planet Mars. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

The solid rocket boosters, built by NASA contractor Orbital ATK, operate in parallel with SLS’s main engines for the first two minutes of flight.

They will provide more than 75 per cent of the thrust needed for the rocket and Orion spacecraft to escape Earth’s gravitational pull.

“Today’s test is the pinnacle of years of hard work by the NASA team, Orbital ATK and commercial partners across the country,” added John Honeycutt, SLS programme manager at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Centre in Huntsville, Alabama.

“SLS hardware is currently in production for every part of the rocket. NASA also is making progress every day on Orion and the ground systems to support a launch from Kennedy Space Center in Florida. We’re on track to launch SLS on its first flight test with Orion and pave the way for a human presence in deep space.”

In March 2015, it has successfully completed the first full-scale booster qualification ground test. (IANS)

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HyperAdapt 1.0 : Nike goes laceless

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Zr2L3DtKH8

Nike, one of the prestigious shoe-manufacturing brands across the world, has decided to go laceless with its new invention – HyperAdapt 1.0.

Powered by an underfoot lacing mechanism consisting of tiny motors that run up and rounds the whole body of the shoe, it makes the laces tighten whenever the heels hit the bottom of the sensor pre-installed into the unique innovation. One can manually control the tightening or loose down of the laces just by pressing the plus or minus buttons on the top of the shoe.

As claimed by Nike, the new model will provide with precise, consistent and personalized lockdown for the wear. It can especially be beneficial for the athletes as cited by Hatfield as the feet, undergoes a variable amount of pressure during the competition.

While Nike’s Senior Innovator, Tiffany Beers adds that their ultimate aim was to “to embed the technical components into such a small space that the design moves with the body and absorbs the same force the athlete is facing”.

The shoes will become available from the later part of this year while the brand informs on their website that the new HyperAdapt 1.0 is to be sold only to the member of the Nike+, an app that is recently launched by the company to extend hands to the athletes. (This news is brought to you by NewsGram in collaboration with VOA)