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HIV Diagnose In The LGBTQ Community Goes Down In Australia: Study

The declines were attributed to higher coverage of HIV testing and treatment in the country -- two important strategies.

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Queensland, Australia, Hindu
FILE - A dead tree stands near a water tank in a drought-stricken paddock located on the outskirts of the southwestern Queensland town of Cunnamulla in outback Australia, Aug. 10, 2017. (VOA)

HIV diagnoses in Australia have hit a five-year low, with a significant drop among homosexual and bisexual men, latest figures from a major study released on Monday said.

“The good news from the report is there’s been a seven per cent decline in HIV diagnoses in the past five years, with 953 diagnoses in 2017, which compares to over 1,000 in previous years,” Professor Rebecca Guy from the University of New South Wales said here

“What’s interesting this year is the decline has not been equal across all populations,” she said.

HIV
School girls light candles in the shape of a ribbon during a HIV/AIDS awareness campaign ahead of World Aids Day, in Ahmedabad, India, Nov. 30, 2016. (VOA)

The figures involving heterosexuals have increased by 10 per cent in the last five years, Xinhua news agency reported. While those among indigenous population were also twice those of the non-indigenous ones.

The declines were attributed to higher coverage of HIV testing and treatment in the country — two important strategies, she added.

Also Read: Queensland in Australia To Combat Diseases And Deaths Caused By Climate-Change

“The key message is, for people living with HIV, increasing tendency for more frequent testing must become “an established norm”, Associate Professor Limin Mao added. (IANS)

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Know About This Simple Blood Test That Can Identify Heart Diseases

Simple blood test can help reduce heart disease deaths

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Blood test
Researchers have revealed how a simple blood test could be used to help identify cardiovascular ageing and the risk of heart disease. (Representational Image). Pixabay

Researchers have revealed how a simple blood test could be used to help identify cardiovascular ageing and the risk of heart disease. This is the latest news.

The study, published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, reported that higher levels of amyloid-beta in the blood may be a key indicator of cardiovascular disease.

Amyloid-beta is known to be involved in the development of Alzheimer’s disease, yet researchers have now concluded that it may have a key role to play in vascular stiffening, thickening of the arteries, heart failure and heart disease progression.

It is hoped that this research will one day lead to the development of a simple blood test that could be used as a clinical biomarker to identify patients who are most at risk, so that preventative measures can be put in place and death rates reduced.

Blood test
Higher levels of amyloid-beta in the blood may be a key indicator of cardiovascular disease. Pixabay

“Our work has created and put all the pieces of the puzzle together. For the first time, we have provided evidence of the involvement of amyloid-beta in early and later stages of cardiovascular disease,” said study researcher Konstantinos Stellos from Newcastle University in the UK.

For the findings, the research team analysed blood samples from more than 6,600 patients from multiple cohort studies in nine countries, and found that patients could be divided into high and low risk categories of heart disease based on their amyloid-beta levels.

“What is really exciting is that we were able to reproduce these unexpected, clinically meaningful findings in patients from around the world. In all cases, we observed that amyloid-beta is a biomarker of cardiovascular ageing and of cardiovascular disease prognosis,” Stellos added.

The study proposed the existence of a common link between both conditions, which has not been acknowledged before, and could lead to better patient care. The findings suggest that the higher the level of amyloid-beta in the blood the higher the risk of developing serious heart complications.

Also Read- Samsung Unveils Galaxy M31 Smartphone in India

In the future, it is hoped that a simple blood test could be added to the current method of patient screening, known as the GRACE score, which assesses heart attack risk and guides patients’ treatment plans. Using the GRACE score, eight factors are used to predict the risk of heart attack, including age, blood pressure, kidney function and elevated biomarkers. (IANS)