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Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) May Combat Lung Function Decline in Women: Study

Menopause, where the level of female hormones such as estrogen and progesterone fall, accelerates the decline in lung function

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Women who undergo HRT have less chances of lung function decline. Pixabay
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London, Sep 12, 2017: Hormone replacement therapy (HRT), used to treat common symptoms of menopause, can help slow the decline in lung function in middle-aged women, according to new research.

Women who suffer from airway diseases, the decline in lung function may influence quality of life, as it could lead to an increase in shortness of breath, reduced work capacity and fatigue.

According to the study, menopause, where the level of female hormones such as estrogen and progesterone fall, accelerates the decline in lung function.

But women who took HRT — where these hormones are prescribed — for two or more years lost an average of 46 ml less of lung volume compared with women who never took HRT.

“Our findings show that female sex hormones are important for the preservation of lung function in middle-aged women,” Kai Triebner, post-doctoral student at the University of Bergen in Norway.

Also Read: Abdominal fat drives cancer in postmenopausal women: Study 

For the study, presented at the European Respiratory Society International Congress in Milan, Italy, the team followed 3,713 women for approximately 20 years from the early 1990s to 2010.

While HRT can help with menopausal symptoms and protects against osteoporosis, it has also been linked with an increase in the risk of breast cancer and heart and blood vessel problems.

“Women with existing health problems, for instance asthma, need to be followed more thoroughly through the menopausal transition and be provided with advice on medications that take the changing hormone levels better into account — ideally with a personalised approach,” Triebner added. (IANS)

 

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Drug Used For Osteoporosis May Help in Reducing Heart Attack Risk

Intake of the drug also reduced the risk of stroke by 18 per cent within five years and 17 per cent within 10 years.

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A commonly used drug for treating osteoporosis or bone pain may also help reduce the risk of death by cardiovascular, heart attack and stroke, according to a study.
Heart Attack risk can be decreased by drug of osteoporosis, Pixabay

A commonly used drug for treating osteoporosis or bone pain may also help reduce the risk of death by cardiovascular, heart attack and stroke, according to a study.

The report, published in Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, showed that the drug Alendronate could lower the risk of cardiovascular diseases by 67 per cent and heart attacks by 45 per cent within a year.

Intake of the drug also reduced the risk of stroke by 18 per cent within five years and 17 per cent within 10 years.

“Our findings show that Alendronate is potentially cardioprotective in hip fracture patients,” said Ching-Lung Cheung, from the University of Hong Kong.

“Physicians should consider prescribing Alendronate or other similar drugs to patients with hip fracture and patients should also have good compliance with Alendronate treatment, as this is not only good for your bones but also your heart,” Cheung added.

It is used for osteoporosis, osteogenesis imperfecta, and several other bone diseases.
Spine Bones, Pixabay

Alendronate belongs to a class of drugs called bisphosphonates and works by preventing bone breakdown and increasing bone density.

It is used for osteoporosis, osteogenesis imperfecta, and several other bone diseases.

The researchers collected data from 34,991 patients, diagnosed with hip fracture in 2005. Out of these 4,602 patients received osteoporosis treatment during follow up.

Also Read: Healthy Diet May Decrease the Risk of Hearing Loss in Women 

Due to excess cardiovascular adverse events, there is a worldwide crisis in the current treatment of osteoporosis with drug romosozumab.

In 2017, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) had rejected romosozumab and requested more data before reaching a decision.

The study, thus, has significant implications in clinical trial design of anti-osteoporosis medications, the researchers said. (IANS)