Monday September 23, 2019

Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) May Combat Lung Function Decline in Women: Study

Menopause, where the level of female hormones such as estrogen and progesterone fall, accelerates the decline in lung function

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HRT
Women who undergo HRT have less chances of lung function decline. Pixabay

London, Sep 12, 2017: Hormone replacement therapy (HRT), used to treat common symptoms of menopause, can help slow the decline in lung function in middle-aged women, according to new research.

Women who suffer from airway diseases, the decline in lung function may influence quality of life, as it could lead to an increase in shortness of breath, reduced work capacity and fatigue.

According to the study, menopause, where the level of female hormones such as estrogen and progesterone fall, accelerates the decline in lung function.

But women who took HRT — where these hormones are prescribed — for two or more years lost an average of 46 ml less of lung volume compared with women who never took HRT.

“Our findings show that female sex hormones are important for the preservation of lung function in middle-aged women,” Kai Triebner, post-doctoral student at the University of Bergen in Norway.

Also Read: Abdominal fat drives cancer in postmenopausal women: Study 

For the study, presented at the European Respiratory Society International Congress in Milan, Italy, the team followed 3,713 women for approximately 20 years from the early 1990s to 2010.

While HRT can help with menopausal symptoms and protects against osteoporosis, it has also been linked with an increase in the risk of breast cancer and heart and blood vessel problems.

“Women with existing health problems, for instance asthma, need to be followed more thoroughly through the menopausal transition and be provided with advice on medications that take the changing hormone levels better into account — ideally with a personalised approach,” Triebner added. (IANS)

 

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Study: Early Onset of Menstruation Associated with Higher Risk of Diabetes

"Other factors such as nutrition and BMI in childhood may also play a role in this association," Faubion added

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diabetes, menstruation
Each year of delay in menarche age correlated with a six per cent lower risk of Type-2 diabetes. Pixabay

Early onset of menstruation is associated with a higher risk of Type-2 diabetes, but body mass index (BMI) may mediate this link, says a study. Each year of delay in menarche age correlated with a six per cent lower risk of Type-2 diabetes, said the study published in the journal Menopause.

“Earlier onset of menses (14 y) was associated with diabetes in later life, likely driven by adult BMI (body mass index),” said Stephanie Faubion, Medical Director, North American Menopause Society (NAMS).

“Other factors such as nutrition and BMI in childhood may also play a role in this association,” Faubion added. Type-2 diabetes mellitus has become one of the most common diseases worldwide. In 2015, it affected nearly 8.8 per cent of people aged 20 to 79 globally, and by 2040, it is expected to affect 10.4 per cent.

Menstruation, diabetes
Earlier onset of menses (14 y) was associated with diabetes in later life, likely driven by adult BMI (body mass index). Pixabay

With so many people affected, it is not surprising how much research has been devoted to identifying determinants of the disease in order to prevent its development. Various lifestyle and environmental factors have already been confirmed, but there is also growing evidence pointing to some physiologic factors.

ALSO READ: U.N. Agencies Urging Governments to Encourage Mothers to Breastfeed Their Babies

This new study, analysing more than 15,000 postmenopausal women in China, has found that women who begin menstruating at an earlier age have a higher risk of developing Type-2 diabetes. (IANS)