Thursday March 21, 2019

Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) May Combat Lung Function Decline in Women: Study

Menopause, where the level of female hormones such as estrogen and progesterone fall, accelerates the decline in lung function

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Women who undergo HRT have less chances of lung function decline. Pixabay

London, Sep 12, 2017: Hormone replacement therapy (HRT), used to treat common symptoms of menopause, can help slow the decline in lung function in middle-aged women, according to new research.

Women who suffer from airway diseases, the decline in lung function may influence quality of life, as it could lead to an increase in shortness of breath, reduced work capacity and fatigue.

According to the study, menopause, where the level of female hormones such as estrogen and progesterone fall, accelerates the decline in lung function.

But women who took HRT — where these hormones are prescribed — for two or more years lost an average of 46 ml less of lung volume compared with women who never took HRT.

“Our findings show that female sex hormones are important for the preservation of lung function in middle-aged women,” Kai Triebner, post-doctoral student at the University of Bergen in Norway.

Also Read: Abdominal fat drives cancer in postmenopausal women: Study 

For the study, presented at the European Respiratory Society International Congress in Milan, Italy, the team followed 3,713 women for approximately 20 years from the early 1990s to 2010.

While HRT can help with menopausal symptoms and protects against osteoporosis, it has also been linked with an increase in the risk of breast cancer and heart and blood vessel problems.

“Women with existing health problems, for instance asthma, need to be followed more thoroughly through the menopausal transition and be provided with advice on medications that take the changing hormone levels better into account — ideally with a personalised approach,” Triebner added. (IANS)

 

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First-Of-Its-Kind Scientific Study Reveals, One Feels Old Early In India Than in Japan

"Government leaders and other stakeholders influencing health systems need to consider when people begin suffering the negative effects of ageing."

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Age-related health problems can lead to early retirement, a smaller work force, and higher health spending. Pixabay

If you live in India, you will begin to suffer the negative effects of ageing at an early age than if you live in Japan or Switzerland, says a first-of-its-kind scientific study.

According to the paper published in The Lancet Public Health, a 30-year-gap separates countries with the highest and lowest ages at which people experience the health problems of a 65-year-old.

Researchers found 76-year-olds in Japan and 46-year-olds in Papua New Guinea have the same level of age-related health problems as an “average” person aged 65.

The study, however, noted that countries such as China and India are performing better in all age-related disease burden rankings.

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Researchers found 76-year-olds in Japan and 46-year-olds in Papua New Guinea have the same level of age-related health problems as an “average” person aged 65. Pixabay

India ranks 159th on age-related burden rate and 138th on age-related disease burden rate.

France (76 years) was third, Singapore fourth (76 years) and Kuwait fifth (75.3 years) in the age-related disease burden rankings. At 68.5 years, the United States ranked 54th, between Iran (69 years) and Antigua and Barbuda (68.4 years).

“The findings show increased life expectancy at older ages can either be an opportunity or a threat to the overall welfare of population, depending on the ageing-related health problems the population experiences regardless of chronological age.” said Angela Y Chang, lead author from the University of Washington.

Age-related health problems can lead to early retirement, a smaller work force, and higher health spending.

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India ranks 159th on age-related burden rate and 138th on age-related disease burden rate. Pixabay

“Government leaders and other stakeholders influencing health systems need to consider when people begin suffering the negative effects of ageing,” Chang said.

The negative effects, include impaired functions and loss of physical, mental, and cognitive abilities resulting from the 92 medical conditions analysed — five of which are communicable and 81 non-communicable, along with six injuries.

To reach the conclusion, the researchers measured “age-related disease burden” by aggregating all disability-adjusted life years — a measurement of loss of healthy life, related to the 92 diseases.

Also Read: Research Reveals Majority Of People Look For Camera As Top Specification While Buying A New Phone

Using global average 65-year-olds as a reference group, Chang and the team also estimated the ages at which the population in each country experienced the same related burden rate.

The study covered the period of 1990 to 2017 in 195 countries and territories. (IANS)