Tuesday February 19, 2019
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How AAP plans to give sports a major push and what rest of India can learn from it

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By Santosh Dubey

Sports infrastructure, a development contributor, has been in fact, its own enemy. Indian sports culture or rather the lack of such a culture in the country is attributed to the size of youth population and the dismal performances in many mega-sporting events, that have often been linked to poor sports infrastructure.

Delhi, the national capital, holds a special advantage over other states as it is host to several international games and hence has some world class stadiums and training centers.

In states, sports and its development depends largely on the priority list. Within a few months of coming into power, Aam Admi Party (AAP) has shown interest in promoting a helpful sports culture in the state through its advisory body, Delhi Dialogue Commission (DDC). The Commission held a meeting with Olympic gold medalist Abhinav Bindra, former tennis player Manisha Malhotra and other sportspersons as well as experts on the issue.

Experts suggested that the state government should map all the existing sport facilities and infrastructure along with the authority that owns them. Also, Delhi government school playgrounds should be opened for community children in the evenings.

“They suggested that government must engage with the Resident Welfare Associations (RWAs) to open up residential parks for sport,” DDC official said.

“In the meeting, it was also suggested that open spaces be utilized for sports in engagement with the civil society and local people.

“Also, right to play should be considered a legal right of every child at school level. Students’ fitness improvement programs should be launched at school level,” the DDC said in a statement.

According to it, greater allowances and incentives should be given to promote sports as a career.

“In the meeting, it was suggested that State Sports Bill should be drafted and enacted so as to make district and state sports bodies accountable and transparent in their functioning by adopting good democratic principles and best international practices.

“Such as restricting the age and tenure of their office bearers, voluntary disclosures on sports authorities websites, bringing the, under the ambit of Right to Information Act, ensuring free and fair election, creation of state sports tribunal, athletes commission, ethics commission and election commission, among others,” it stated.

Local community involvement is sine qua non to promote sports as a culture. AAP’s approach can well be followed by other states to engage local schools and RWAs in inculcating sporting habits among children. However, other states do not have the kind of infrastructure that Delhi enjoys. So on one hand where Delhi needs to properly utilize its infrastructure in an impartial manner, other states need to develop and improve in an efficient way.

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Low Cure Rate For Childhood Cancer in India: Experts

On International Childhood Cancer Day, the hospital organised a ‘Sit and Draw competition’ with pediatric patients and rewarded the winner

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Health insurance covers only for hospitalization and doesn’t necessarily cover the medical expenses incurred for the treatment of major illnesses. flickr

Childhood cancer comprises almost 3-5 per cent of the total cancer cases in India, experts said here on Friday, expressing concern over the low cure rate due to lack of available data.

“The disturbing reality is that the cure rate of pediatric cancer is almost 80 per cent in the developed countries. When we see the data from major cancer centres, it actually can match up to the Western standard but this data is not enough,” Haemato-Oncologist Vivek Agarwala said at an awareness programme conducted by Narayana Superspecialty Hospital, Howrah.

According to the Indian Council for Medical Research, cancer in children constitutes approximately 3-5 per cent of the total cancer cases in India.

Agarwala said a large portion of the incidence of childhood cancer in society is still not addressed.

Cancer survivor. Flickr

Also, a large section who don’t have access to premier institutes are often diagnosed late due to financial crunch and that is why the overall treatment rate in India is low.

“Probably, the government and society at large are not considering it a big problem as it is just around 5 per cent. We are always campaigning for breast and cervical cancers,” Agarwala said.

“We must remember this 5 per cent of cancer is majorly curable if given proper treatment,” he said.

Leukaemia and retinoblastoma (a form of cancer where children have a white eye) are the two common forms of cancer in children.

Also Read- Push-ups Can Lower The Risk of Heart Diseases

Talking about awareness and symptoms that parents need to watch out for, he said: “Symptoms are different for different cancers, but children who have cancer have poor growth, poor weight gain and decreased appetite. One must get their children evaluated on seeing these symptoms”.

On International Childhood Cancer Day, the hospital organised a ‘Sit and Draw competition’ with pediatric patients and rewarded the winner. (IANS)