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How Delhi Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal plans to clean River Yamuna

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Delhi Elections 2015 and AAP

Delhi Elections 2015 and AAP

By Newsgram Staff Writer

Delhi Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal  speaking at the CII National Conference and Annual Session in New Delhi  showed his inclination towards grounded governance latched with noble and simple ideas.

His specific areas of concern were water recycling , Yamuna cleanliness, solid waste management and generation of jobs .

He shared with his listeners how industry can help Delhi in generating jobs. He said a prosperous industry will make the state one of the top five honest cities of the world.

He said problem of water can be solved by using technology for setting up water recycling and recharging plants. Industry can also come up with new ideas to meet the requirements of the city.

Talking about the cleaning of Yamuna river, he  proposed lakes to be built around the river to beautify the view.  He also suggested that storing water that accumulates after rainy season will help in fixing the water problem of the state.  “If you have any ideas on water recycling or water recharging , I would encourage you, come to us,” he asked the industrialists.

To manage solid waste, he recommended the use of solid suction machines. He said the current cleaning mechanism only leads to lifting dirt from one place and dumping it to another.

Chief Minister of Delhi also shared steps taken by their government to deal with everyday  grievances of Delhites.

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Delhi Government Gives Nod To a Project to Create Reservoirs in Yamuna Flood Plain

The Delhi Cabinet, in its meeting chaired by Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal, on Wednesday approved the inter-departmental committee report

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The pilot for the project, which has the potential for ending Delhi's water shortage, particularly during summer months, is aimed to start in a month's time. Pixabay

To achieve self-sufficiency of water, the Delhi government on Wednesday gave its nod to a project to create reservoirs in the Yamuna flood plain by store overflowing water from the river during the monsoon season, an official statement said.

The pilot for the project, which has the potential for ending Delhi’s water shortage, particularly during summer months, is aimed to start in a month’s time, the statement said.

The Delhi Cabinet, in its meeting chaired by Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal, on Wednesday approved the inter-departmental committee report on the project.

The report recommended that an amount of Rs 77,000 per acre should be paid to the farmers for leasing their land for the pilot project.

Delhi, Government, Project
To achieve self-sufficiency of water, the Delhi government on Wednesday gave its nod to a project to create reservoirs in the Yamuna flood plain by store overflowing water from the river. Pixabay

“The farmers will get the sum according to the number of acres of land they give the government on lease for the pilot project,” the government said.

The government claims that the pilot project will prove to be a game-changer not only for Delhi, but for the whole country which is facing huge water crisis in different parts.

It also said the project is first of its kind in the country.

“The important project aims at conserving water in the Yamuna floodplains and creating a mega reservoir between Palla and Wazirabad to deal with the water shortage in Delhi, particularly during summer months,” the government said.

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The project envisages creation of small ponds in the floodplains which will catch overflows from the Yamuna during the monsoon.

“Most of the approvals have been received for the pilot project, barring two from the National Green Tribunal (NGT) committees, which are expected very soon,” it said.

Kejriwal also thanked Union Jal Shakti Minister Gajendra Singh Shekhawat for the quick approvals by the Centre for the project and cooperation Delhi received from Centre for the pilot project. (IANS)