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How to Score Well in Chemistry With eBooks?

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Chemistry is often studied alongside Physics, and it remains equally important for both NEET and board exams. Pixabay

July 3, 2017: Students preparing for NEET often look at Chemistry different than Physics and Biology. Chemistry is one of the highest scoring subjects among PCB, but it also one of the most feared one. Chemistry is often studied alongside Physics, and it remains equally important for both NEET and board exams. Chemistry is rooted in the study of concepts, theories and retaining important formulas and values.

Chemistry is divided into three sub divisions viz. Organic, Inorganic and Physical Chemistry. Students can score well in chemistry if they are thorough with the concepts. There are several ways you can improve your preparation, and crack the exam if you follow the right method and use the right tools.

eBooks are a brilliant way of studying chemistry, especially inorganic chemistry which requires a lot of learning and revision. A NEET eBook on Chemistry will set you on the right path, and give you the freedom to learn at your place and your pace.

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Here’s how you should study Chemistry with eBooks

Organic Chemistry

Organic chemistry is all about rules and is a sure shot of scoring well if you know your concepts. It is necessary to remember and practice all rules and exceptions for all reactions.  A NEET eBook comes handy when studying organic chemistry as you can study and practice reactions like Nucleophilic and Electrophilic substitution/addition, Wolff-Kishner, Clemmensen Reduction and more. eBooks also come handy when you want to study and learn about IUPAC naming of the compounds. Certain eBooks from eLearning platforms like Aakash iTutor come with hundreds of practice questions and are designed for competitive exams.

Inorganic Chemistry 

Inorganic chemistry is the most theoretical part of chemistry, and it requires a lot of learning and retention. With eBooks, you can study the entire chapter, take notes and try to retain as much as possible. The benefits of studying from NEET eBook is that you can accommodate more than one learning style. However, the best part is that you can use the search feature in an eBook, and go through various reactions and subtopics with just a click. It can be especially beneficial in an event where you must search for an answer quickly. Topics like p-Block elements will require you to go back and forth to various reactions, and it is where a search function comes handy.

Physical Chemistry

Physical chemistry is all about formulas and practicing problems on electrochemistry, chemical kinetics, surface chemistry, and solutions. eBooks have a repository of formulas and important reactions that are used in questions. Every topic under physical chemistry holds equal importance, and one must study it thoroughly. In physical chemistry, it is imperative to solve previous year’s question paper.

There are other benefits of studying from eBooks, and it holds true for all subjects. NEET eBook for every subject can be beneficial for the competitive exam in many ways.

Here are some benefits of eBooks that apply to all subjects when preparing for NEET.

Portability – eBooks are extremely portable and can be accessed from any smart device like laptop, smartphone and more. It is easy to organize your class material digitally, access them whenever you want.

Search – Studying from a NEET eBook will allow you to search for anything in a fraction of seconds. The functionality of an eBook is hard to beat, and they are convenient when it comes to studying, practicing and revising.

More Learning Styles – The study material of a NEET eBook will be presented slightly differently from the regular textbooks. With Aakash iTutor, a digital learning platform, you get more than 200 high-quality eBooks prepared by experts at Aakash Institute.

Buy Chapters as Per the Requirement – If you are preparing for NEET, you might only need to revise certain chapters, or modules. Alternatively, you might just need an eBook for chemistry. With Aakash iTutor, you have the privilege to buy digital study material as you wish.

Online learning is a powerful learning environment for students who want to learn things at their own pace and save time and energy on traveling to a tuition center. eBooks provide a flexible learning environment and are suited students who are preparing for competitive exams like NEET.

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34 Indian Scientists invited for 67th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting in Germany

A total of 400 young scientists from 76 countries have been selected to participate in the meeting, where they will meet Nobel laureates at Lake Constance

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Nobel Prize (Representational Image). Wikimedia

Kolkata, March 22, 2017: As many as 34 young Indian scientists have been invited for the 67th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting in Germany from June 25 to 30, it was announced on Wednesday.

A total of 400 young scientists from 76 countries have been selected to participate in the meeting, where they will meet Nobel laureates at Lake Constance.

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“Of the 34 young Indian scientists, 22 are based at Indian universities or institutes while the other 12 are currently based … abroad (in Australia, Germany, Ireland, Israel, the UK, and the US),” said a statement from the communications department of the Council for the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings.

“Every year, one-to-two members of the Council for the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings travel to India to assist with the selection of young scientists. Besides India, the only other country that they travel to in order to assist with the selection process is China,” the communique said.

In South Asia, five young scientists from Pakistan and one young scientist from Bangladesh have been selected to participate.

The meetings have taken place every year since 1951 and are designed as a forum for exchange, networking and inspiration.

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The 2017 meeting is dedicated to Chemistry. So far, 31 Nobel laureates have confirmed their participation.

The young scientists are outstanding undergraduate students, graduate students and post-doctorates under the age of 35, conducting research in the field of Chemistry.

They have successfully passed a multi-stage international selection process. 155 scientific institutes, universities, foundations and research-oriented companies contributed to the nominations.

The proportion of women among the selected young scientists is 45 per cent.

Bernard Feringa and Jean-Pierre Sauvage, who received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2016, together with Sir Fraser Stoddart, for the design of molecular machines, will also participate in this year’s meeting.

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 Besides molecular machines, the key topics of the this year’s meeting will include big data, climate change and the role of science in a ‘post-truth’ era.

The selected young scientists may expect a six-day programme with numerous lectures and panel discussions. Some of them will also get the opportunity to discuss their own work at one of the master classes or at the poster session. (IANS)

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Nihonium makes its way into The Periodic Table with 3 other Elements

A day after “nihonium” was announced as the name of atomic element 113, the physicist who led the discovery team said the name was chosen to thank Japanese people for their support

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Kosuke Morita of Riken points to 'nihonium'. Image courtesy: japantimes.co.jp
  • Four new elements were discovered late last year, in 2015 and have been approved by IUPAC
  • Nihonium is the first element to be discovered in an Asian country
  • The discoverers are provided with an option to name the elements, which is then approved by the IUPAC

It’s time to update the periodic table once again. Scientists all over the world have discovered four new elements in the past year, 2015, all of them being super heavy and radioactive. Their names pend approval by International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry, the panel of international scientists responsible for the table.

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Currently, the names of the new elements to be introduced into the periodic table are as follows:

  • Nihonium and symbol Nh, for the element 113
  • Moscovium and symbol Mc, for the element 115
  • Tennessine and symbol Ts, for the element 11
  • Oganesson and symbol Og, for the element 118

These names will be be open to public comments and suggestions for a period of five months after which the they will be finalized in early November this year, in 2016.

Periodic table
The Periodic Table. Image courtesy: Wikimedia commons

The new elements were actually incorporated into the periodic table late last year in 2015 and given these temporary and unremarkable names: ununtrium, ununpentium, ununseptium and ununoctoium.

The IUPAC lets the discoverers choose names of their choice, but they should fall under one of the five categories: they should be based on a mineral or substance, a property of the element, a mythological concept or character, a place or geographic region, or a scientist.

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Moscovium was proposed at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna, which is around Moscow. On similar lines, the name Tennessine was to identify scientific contributions from Tennessee, home to the Vanderbilt University, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the University of Tennessee at Knoxville.

Similarly, Nihonium was discovered by scientists at the RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science in Japan. It is the first element to be discovered in an Asian country. Nihon is one of two ways to say “Japan” in Japanese.

Oganesson was named to honor the Russian physicist Yuri Oganessian, who did wonders in discovering superheavy elements. Oganessian is the second scientist to have an element named after him while still alive, the first being Nobel-winning Glenn Seaborg, who discovered plutonium among other things. The element was jointly discovered by collaborating teams of Russians in the city of Dubna and Americans at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California.

-by Saurabh Bodas, an intern at NewsGram. Twitter: @saurabhbodas96

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