How useful is Starch for Health? Consuming Bananas and Potatoes may help you to Check Blood Sugar levels

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Diabetes (Representational image). Wikimedia

London, Jan 6, 2017: Consuming foods such as bananas, potatoes, grains and legumes that are rich in resistant starch may help check blood sugar, enhance satiety as well as improve gut health, a study has found.

Resistant starch is a form of starch that is not digested in the small intestine and is therefore considered a type of dietary fibre.

“We know that adequate fibre intake — at least 30 grams per day — is important for achieving a healthy, balanced diet, which reduces the risk of developing a range of chronic diseases,” said Stacey Lockyer, Nutrition Scientist at British Nutrition Foundation, a Britain-based charity.

Apart from occurring naturally in foods, resistant starch is also produced or modified commercially and incorporated into food products.

Unlike the typical starch, resistant starch acts like a type of fibre in the body as it does not get digested in your small intestine, but is is fermented in the large intestine.

This dietary fibre then increases the production of short chain fatty acids in the gut, which act as an energy source for the colonic cells, thus improving the gut health and increasing satiety.

According to the researchers, there is consistent evidence that consumption of resistant starch can aid blood sugar control. It has also been suggested that resistant starch can support gut health and enhance satiety via increased production of short chain fatty acids.

“Whilst findings support positive effects on some markers, further research is needed in most areas to establish whether consuming resistant starch can confer significant benefits that are relevant to the general population. However, this is definitely an exciting area of nutritional research for the future,” Lockyer said.

The study was published in the journal Nutrition Bulletin. (IANS)

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Tips to Overcome Pandemic Effects During Pregnancy

Pregnant women should stay healthy, calm and safe during pregnancy in current times

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pregnant IVF
Pregnancy might be a little more difficult compared to the earlier times because of the ongoing pandemic. Pixabay

As social distancing and staying at home have become the “new normal” in the current scenario, it is important during pregnancy to keep a calm mind, continue their checkups with doctors on online sessions, and be open about their concerns, say experts according to Health Tips.

“With all the uncertainty around, one of the best things that you can do is be positive and practice ways that will help ensure your and your baby’s well-being,” said Dr. Prathibha Babshet, Ayurveda Expert, R&D, The Himalaya Drug Company.

“This is possible by taking care of your mental health and keeping a calm mind. Pregnancy during the pandemic is certainly hard but not impossible. It is advisable to stay home as much as possible to avoid crowded spaces and follow social distancing and hygiene guidelines,” she said.

While pregnancy care may look a little different now than it used to earlier, here are a few tips to approach these changes:

Try to establish a daily routine of activities in a way that it becomes a new normal in your life. From your diet, meditation, and yoga, to skin care, getting adequate sleep, and regular medical checkups, make a list of all the things you do in a day and prioritise them.

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Establish a daily routine and schedule for yourself. Pixabay

If you need to step out for work or a checkup, remember to maintain social distancing and wear a mask and carry a sanitizer, as this can help reduce the risk of exposure to germs and bacteria.

Frequent checkups during pregnancy is vital for the mother and baby. So, check with your gynaecologist on online sessions for these checkups. If you are due to deliver, understand and be open about the delivery options and post-natal care.

As pregnancy skin care is an important aspect of your motherhood phase, include massages and moisturisation in your daily routine to help deal with common pregnancy skin concerns, Babshet said.

Indulge in a soothing massage using a massage oil; this will help promote blood circulation. You can also opt for a body butter that will help with dry skin issues. Whatever routine you follow, do remember to use products containing herbal actives and that are free from chemicals, she added.

Your baby gets nutrients from what you eat. Avoid binge-eating. Make it a priority to stick to a balanced diet including fruits and vegetables, and drink at least 8-10 glasses of water.

Pregnancy
One should take extra care of their diet during pregnancy and take balanced diet for the good health of the offspring. Pixabay

If you enjoy cooking, look up simple recipes online for a healthy immune system.

Manage your stress in different ways — practice breathing exercises to calm yourself and indulge in new hobbies or rediscover old ones. You can also take online courses on playing an instrument, learning a new language, or anything you have always wanted to do. You may also enjoy planning things for your baby’s arrival, like decorating a nursery.

Also Read: Ways to go Sustainable While Maintaining Menstrual Hygiene

Talk to your doctor if you are anxious about your baby being exposed to the virus during breastfeeding. Always clean your nipple area before and after breastfeeding. Sanitise your hands, and the place around your baby, frequently.

In addition to following these tips, read and be aware of the potential symptoms of the virus and take preventive measures.

Avoid reading negative news about the current situation, which might cause anxiety.

Instead, use the screen time to talk to your friends and family, or watch something you enjoy. This will keep you happy and occupied. (IANS)

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Find Out Why You Need Pulses and Legumes in Your Diet

Power up your diet with pulses and legumes

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pulses legumes
Pulses and legumes are a highly nutritious and sustainable food source packed with proteins, fiber, and other micronutrients. Pixabay

BY ADITI ROY

In the current scenario, it has become difficult to source vegetables easily. There is also fear among people about the virus and hence, the consumption of meat, fish and poultry have also greatly reduced. In such times, it has become important for us to consume the dry sources of foods in a way that they help us in providing essential nutrients in our diet.

“Pulses and legumes are a highly nutritious and sustainable food source packed with proteins, fiber, and other micronutrients such as iron and vitamin B. When paired with rice, wheat, or other cereal grains that are high in sulphur-containing amino acids, pulses’ proteins can fulfil the daily essential amino acid requirements without the need for consuming animal proteins and it is an affordable plant protein source. This kind of dietary strategy is called mutual supplementation in which you combine complementary partially complete protein food to supply adequate amounts of all the essential amino acids,” says Pariksha Rao Co-Founder & Chief Nutrition Officer (CNO) LIL’GOODNESS & COOLMEAL.

For example – beans and brown rice, soy curry and rice; milk and oats, curd and rice, etc.

pulses legumes
Pulses are an excellent complementary food for infants and young children to meet their daily nutritional needs. Pixabay

The powerhouse of nutrients:

Pulses typically contain about twice the amount of protein found in whole grain cereals such as wheat, which for most populations in developing countries they constitute a major source of protein. Pulses are an excellent complementary food for infants and young children to meet their daily nutritional needs. They can be incorporated into children’s diets through family diets. Their high nutrient content also makes pulses ideal for vegetarians and vegans to ensure adequate intakes of protein, minerals and vitamins. When combined with food high in vitamin C, pulses’ high iron content makes them a potent food for replenishing iron stores, particularly for women at reproductive age, who are more at risk for iron deficiency anaemia. Older people can also benefit from eating pulse. In today’s COVID-19 pandemic, if one is not able to source fresh vegetables, add a little amla powder or a few drops of lemon juice to the bowl of your dal and enjoy with roti or rice.

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Nutrient-loaded combination of pulses in your daily diet

Add a combination of pulses along with cereals (to get all the essential amino acids). Besides pulses, other sources of legumes (rajma/ kidney beans, chana/chickpeas, lobia/ black eyed peas, cowpea), green peas, soybean, etc. can also be added.

Add roasted chana/ roasted dals/ roasted soy along with seeds cocktail as a protein snack.

Besan and sattu have been an integral part of Indian cooking and perfect sources of pulse protein.

One part soy flour can be added to 3 parts of wheat flour or other cereals while making chapati dough to improve protein content of daily diet.

Preety Tyagi, Lead Health Coach, Celebrity Nutritionist & Founder My22BMI shares some interesting options we can include the legumes in our daily diet.

Use daals, legumes, chickpeas, beans etc. to their maximum capacity as a source of protein, carbs as well as fiber. The whole dals are more rich in nutrient content and should certainly be consumed at least 4 days in a week.

Make use of all the high fiber grains stored in your kitchen pantries. Remember, whole grains are not only rich in Carbs, but are a great source of fiber as well. They have many other vitamins and minerals as well. They are excellent in providing us the much needed energy as well as the nourishment that we need.

Include Quinoa, Amaranth, Rajgira atta, Millets, Buckwheat flour, Sama rice in your diet. These are highly potent, dry sources of nutrition which are safe to be bought, stored and consumed during these times.

pulses legumes
Pulses typically contain about twice the amount of protein found in whole grain cereals such as wheat. Pixabay

Remember, the lentils, beans, chickpeas etc. can be sprouted to enhance their nutritional benefits. Make use of this during these times of need. Make sprouted moong, sprouted kala channa, Sprouted beans etc, These can be used in preparing cheelas, chaats, salads, sauteed salads etc.

Soak the beans, chickpeas, whole lentils for a long period of time before cooking, to make them easy for your digestive system. Especially for people with gut health issues, it is advisable to soak the rajmas, chhole etc for a period of upto 24 hours, while changing water from time to time. It’s very important especially during these times of sedentary lifestyle.

Eat the various nuts and seeds such as almonds, walnuts, cashew nuts, chia seeds, pumpkin seeds, flax seeds etc. These contain essential omega 3 fatty acids and are a great source of essential minerals as well. You could soak these in water as well for a few hours, to aid in easy digestion for your Gut.

Also Read- ICMR Reports Conducting Over a Million COVID-19 Tests

Make use of all the essential nutrition rich spices we have in our kitchens. You can make a kadha using all essential spices to boost your immunity as well. Use turmeric, sauth, black pepper, and cardamom for the same reason. They are not only full of antibacterial antiseptic properties but are highly non inflammatory foods. (IANS)

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Heavy Breakfast and Light Dinner Can Prevent Obesity

Want to lose weight? Have big breakfast, light dinner

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Eating a big breakfast rather than a large dinner may prevent obesity and high blood sugar. Pixabay

Eating a big breakfast rather than a large dinner may prevent obesity and high blood sugar, a new study suggests. This is a new health advice.

The findings, published in the The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, researchers at the University of Lubeck in Germany, found that the body appears to be better at processing food in the morning.

According to the researchers, our body expends energy when we digest food for the absorption, digestion, transport and storage of nutrients.

This process, known as diet-induced thermogenesis (DIT), is a measure of how well our metabolism is working, and can differ depending on mealtime.

“Our results show that a meal eaten for breakfast, regardless of the amount of calories it contains, creates twice as high diet-induced thermogenesis as the same meal consumed for dinner,” said the study corresponding author, Juliane Richter, from University of Lübeck in Germany.

breakfast dinner
A meal eaten for breakfast, regardless of the amount of calories it contains, creates twice as high diet-induced thermogenesis as the same meal consumed for dinner. Pixabay

“This finding is significant for all people as it underlines the value of eating enough at breakfast,” Richter added.

For the results, the researchers conducted a three-day laboratory study of 16 men who consumed a low-calorie breakfast and high-calorie dinner, and vice versa in a second round.

They found identical calorie consumption led to 2.5 times higher DIT in the morning than in the evening after high-calorie and low-calorie meals.

The food-induced increase of blood sugar and insulin concentrations was diminished after breakfast compared with dinner, the study said.

The results also show eating a low-calorie breakfast increased appetite, specifically for sweets.

Also Read- Ways to Get Rid of Stage Fear

“We recommend that patients with obesity as well as healthy people eat a large breakfast rather than a large dinner to reduce body weight and prevent metabolic diseases,” Richter said.

The study conducted at University of Lubeck in Northern Germany, is a research Institute, focuses almost entirely on medicine and sciences. (IANS)

How useful is Starch for Health? Consuming Bananas and Potatoes may help you to Check Blood Sugar levels
Tips to Overcome Pandemic Effects During Pregnancy
Find Out Why You Need Pulses and Legumes in Your Diet
Heavy Breakfast and Light Dinner Can Prevent Obesity