Sunday October 21, 2018

How useful is Starch for Health? Consuming Bananas and Potatoes may help you to Check Blood Sugar levels

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Diabetes (Representational image). Wikimedia
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London, Jan 6, 2017: Consuming foods such as bananas, potatoes, grains and legumes that are rich in resistant starch may help check blood sugar, enhance satiety as well as improve gut health, a study has found.

Resistant starch is a form of starch that is not digested in the small intestine and is therefore considered a type of dietary fibre.

“We know that adequate fibre intake — at least 30 grams per day — is important for achieving a healthy, balanced diet, which reduces the risk of developing a range of chronic diseases,” said Stacey Lockyer, Nutrition Scientist at British Nutrition Foundation, a Britain-based charity.

Apart from occurring naturally in foods, resistant starch is also produced or modified commercially and incorporated into food products.

Unlike the typical starch, resistant starch acts like a type of fibre in the body as it does not get digested in your small intestine, but is is fermented in the large intestine.

This dietary fibre then increases the production of short chain fatty acids in the gut, which act as an energy source for the colonic cells, thus improving the gut health and increasing satiety.

According to the researchers, there is consistent evidence that consumption of resistant starch can aid blood sugar control. It has also been suggested that resistant starch can support gut health and enhance satiety via increased production of short chain fatty acids.

“Whilst findings support positive effects on some markers, further research is needed in most areas to establish whether consuming resistant starch can confer significant benefits that are relevant to the general population. However, this is definitely an exciting area of nutritional research for the future,” Lockyer said.

The study was published in the journal Nutrition Bulletin. (IANS)

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Novel Artificial Pancreas System To Control Blood Sugar Levels in a Better Way

The device was shown to work for children as young as six - a crucial finding for a condition which often strikes in childhood

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Artificial pancreas system better than insulin jabs for diabetics. Pixabay

A novel artificial pancreas system can control blood sugar levels better than insulin injections for both children and older adults with Type-1 diabetes, results of a clinical trial have shown.

The findings, published in The Lancet, showed that the closed-loop insulin delivery system, as it is called, is better than sensor-augmented pump therapy for blood sugar control and reduced risk of hypoglycaemia — low sugar condition — in poorly controlled Type-1 diabetes patients.

“The use of day-and-night hybrid closed-loop insulin delivery improves glycaemic control while reducing the risk of hypoglycaemia in adults, adolescents and children with Type-1 diabetes compared to conventional pump therapy or sensor-augmented pump therapy,” said researchers including Roman Hovorka from the UK’s University of Cambridge.

“Type 1 diabetes is a challenging condition, but these results take us a step closer to changing the lives of millions of people that live with the condition across the world,” the researchers added.

The artificial pancreas resembles an iPod and is strapped to patients’ clothing with a small monitor and pump fitted to their skin and can both monitor blood sugar as well as inject insulin automatically if blood sugar gets too high, the Daily Mail reported.

Diabetes
Representational image. Pixabay

The device also allows patients to add doses of insulin manually, for example when they are about to eat a big meal.

Insulin pumps, on the other hand, monitors people’s blood sugar levels and warn them when it gets too low or high so they know whether to inject insulin or eat more.

For the trial, the team randomly assigned 44 male and 42 female patients with Type-1 diabetes aged six years and older to receive either hybrid closed-loop therapy or sensor-augmented pump therapy over 12 weeks.

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The amount of time people spent with ‘dangerously’ high or low blood sugar fell by 25 per cent for people using the artificial pancreas, but rose by 18 per cent for people using an ordinary insulin pump, the report said.

The device was shown to work for children as young as six – a crucial finding for a condition which often strikes in childhood. (IANS)