Saturday November 16, 2019

How useful is Starch for Health? Consuming Bananas and Potatoes may help you to Check Blood Sugar levels

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Diabetes (Representational image). Wikimedia

London, Jan 6, 2017: Consuming foods such as bananas, potatoes, grains and legumes that are rich in resistant starch may help check blood sugar, enhance satiety as well as improve gut health, a study has found.

Resistant starch is a form of starch that is not digested in the small intestine and is therefore considered a type of dietary fibre.

“We know that adequate fibre intake — at least 30 grams per day — is important for achieving a healthy, balanced diet, which reduces the risk of developing a range of chronic diseases,” said Stacey Lockyer, Nutrition Scientist at British Nutrition Foundation, a Britain-based charity.

Apart from occurring naturally in foods, resistant starch is also produced or modified commercially and incorporated into food products.

Unlike the typical starch, resistant starch acts like a type of fibre in the body as it does not get digested in your small intestine, but is is fermented in the large intestine.

This dietary fibre then increases the production of short chain fatty acids in the gut, which act as an energy source for the colonic cells, thus improving the gut health and increasing satiety.

According to the researchers, there is consistent evidence that consumption of resistant starch can aid blood sugar control. It has also been suggested that resistant starch can support gut health and enhance satiety via increased production of short chain fatty acids.

“Whilst findings support positive effects on some markers, further research is needed in most areas to establish whether consuming resistant starch can confer significant benefits that are relevant to the general population. However, this is definitely an exciting area of nutritional research for the future,” Lockyer said.

The study was published in the journal Nutrition Bulletin. (IANS)

Next Story

Lipid, Produced in Response to Cold by Brown Adipose Tissue in Human Body, Helps Reduce Blood Sugar

The group also observed that a drug used to treat urinary dysfunction increases the amount of 12-HEPE released into the bloodstream

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Lipid, Cold, Blood Sugar
The discovery with the lipid known as 12-HEPE can pave the way for new treatments for diabetes, said the team from Brazil, the US and Germany. Pixabay

A team of global researchers has discovered that a lipid — produced in response to cold by brown adipose tissue in the human body — helps reduce blood sugar.

The discovery with the lipid known as 12-HEPE can pave the way for new treatments for diabetes, said the team from Brazil, the US and Germany.

The group also observed that a drug used to treat urinary dysfunction increases the amount of 12-HEPE released into the bloodstream in human patients.

White adipose tissue, one of the two types of adipose tissue in mammals, including humans, stores excess energy as fat.

Lipid, Cold, Blood Sugar
A team of global researchers has discovered that a lipid — produced in response to cold by brown adipose tissue in the human body — helps reduce blood sugar. Pixabay

The other kind is brown adipose tissue, which converts energy from food into heat and contributes to thermal regulation.

The function of the lipid “12-HEPE” was unknown until the group discovered that blood sugar was reduced more efficiently in obese mice treated with 12-HEPE than in untreated mice after they were injected with a concentrated glucose solution.

According to the paper published in the journal Cell Metabolism, the beneficial effect of 12-HEPE on glucose tolerance in obese mice was due to its promotion of glucose uptake into both skeletal muscle and brown adipose tissue.

The study’s first author is Luiz Osorio Leiria, a researcher at the University of Campinas’s Biology Institute (IB-UNICAMP) in Sao Paulo State, Brazil.

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The discovery lays a foundation for the development of new drugs to combat diabetes and possible new treatments with currently available drugs.

US researchers are currently conducting tests to measure the effects of relatively low doses of the drug on blood sugar levels. (IANS)