Friday July 19, 2019

Human skeletons dating back to Harappan era found in Haryana

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Indus Valley Civilization

Indus Valley Civilization

By Newsgram Staff Writer

The Indus Valley Civilization renowned for its urban planning, baked brick houses and elaborate drainage system is yet again in news as a group of archaeologists have dug up four human skeletons dating back to the subcontinent’s oldest civilization.

The remains that have been recently discovered from a cemetery in Haryana are of two adult males, a female and a child, a news report said.  Scholars say that the skeletons will help them to shed more light on the life of the Harappan people.

Since 2013, the archaeologist and scientists from India and South Korea were carrying out the excavation at the cemetery at Rakhigarhi village in Haryana’s Hissar district, BBC reported.

The excavation has also unearthed items like pottery with food grains and shell bangles found near the skeletons, which enabled the archaeologists to consider that the settlers had faith in reincarnation.

Scientists from South Korea at the site who are equipped with advanced technology would now attempt to reconstruct the DNA of the skeletons, said archaeologist Ranvir Singh.

The civilization is also known as Harappan civilization due to first of its excavations carried out in the 1920s at a place named Harappa, which is now in Pakistan. It is said that the civilization flourished with a population of over 5 million settlers during its peak. Also, the inhabitants of the civilization are noted for their development of new techniques in handicraft.

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Ukraine’s Crimean Peninsula To Delete Tatar Collaboration From Crimean History Textbook

The pages that are to be removed include a claim that the majority of Crimean Tatars "were loyal to" the Nazis, and that "many actively helped them."

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Textbook
Russian Authorities To Remove Tatar Collaboration Slur From Crimean History Textbook RFERL

The Russian authorities who control Ukraine’s Crimean Peninsula have promised to remove a section of a high-school history textbook that claims many Crimean Tatars collaborated with Nazi Germany during World War II.

The senior education official in the Russian-imposed government of Crimea, Natalya Goncharova, said on May 6 that the pages in question would be removed from the 10th-grade textbook History Of Crimea by the end of the month.

Educators and lawyers — some of them members of the indigenous, mainly Muslim Crimean Tatar minority — have urged the authorities to remove the book from the curriculum, saying that it threatens to incite ethnic and religious hatred among teenagers.

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Russia seized control of the peninsula in March 2014, sending in troops without insignia, securing key facilities, and staging a referendum deemed illegitimate by Ukraine and most other world countries. Pixabay

The pages that are to be removed include a claim that the majority of Crimean Tatars “were loyal to” the Nazis, and that “many actively helped them.”

The claim echoes the pretext that Soviet dictator Josef Stalin’s government used when it deported Crimean Tatars en masse from the Black Sea peninsula in 1944, asserting that they were collaborators.

Many died on the journey or in exile in Central Asia and the steppes of southern Russia.

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The senior education official in the Russian-imposed government of Crimea, Natalya Goncharova, said on May 6 that the pages in question would be removed from the 10th-grade textbook History Of Crimea by the end of the month.Pixabay

Crimean Tatars were allowed to begin returning to their homeland in the late 1980s, and make up some 12 percent of its population.

Also Read: Concentration Camps: Uyghurs Chafed Under Tough Chinese Controls During Ramadan

Russia seized control of the peninsula in March 2014, sending in troops without insignia, securing key facilities, and staging a referendum deemed illegitimate by Ukraine and most other world countries.

Rights groups and Western governments say Russia has conducted a persistent campaign of oppression targeting Crimean Tatars and other citizens who opposed Moscow’s takeover of the peninsula. (RFERL)