Thursday February 27, 2020

Human skeletons dating back to Harappan era found in Haryana

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Indus Valley Civilization

Indus Valley Civilization

By Newsgram Staff Writer

The Indus Valley Civilization renowned for its urban planning, baked brick houses and elaborate drainage system is yet again in news as a group of archaeologists have dug up four human skeletons dating back to the subcontinent’s oldest civilization.

The remains that have been recently discovered from a cemetery in Haryana are of two adult males, a female and a child, a news report said.  Scholars say that the skeletons will help them to shed more light on the life of the Harappan people.

Since 2013, the archaeologist and scientists from India and South Korea were carrying out the excavation at the cemetery at Rakhigarhi village in Haryana’s Hissar district, BBC reported.

The excavation has also unearthed items like pottery with food grains and shell bangles found near the skeletons, which enabled the archaeologists to consider that the settlers had faith in reincarnation.

Scientists from South Korea at the site who are equipped with advanced technology would now attempt to reconstruct the DNA of the skeletons, said archaeologist Ranvir Singh.

The civilization is also known as Harappan civilization due to first of its excavations carried out in the 1920s at a place named Harappa, which is now in Pakistan. It is said that the civilization flourished with a population of over 5 million settlers during its peak. Also, the inhabitants of the civilization are noted for their development of new techniques in handicraft.

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Chinese Scientists Reveal Distribution History of Endangered Trees

The study was published in the journal Ecology and Evolution

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Trees Landscape
Trees have spiritual representation. Pixabay

Chinese scientists have revealed how the distribution of abies trees changed in the Quaternary glacial period, providing scientific guidance for the protection of the endangered species against climate change.

As an ancient and typical coniferous species living in southwest China, abies is a good example to study the impact of the ongoing climate changes, which are similar to those in the Quaternary period, on biodiversity in this area, the Xinhua news agency reported.

Researchers from the Chengdu Institute of Biology under the Chinese Academy of Sciences rebuilt the distribution patterns in different periods of four abies taxa to know how they migrated in response to adverse climate.

Climate, Crisis, Vulnerable, trees
According to the distribution patterns of abies showed in the study, the researchers suggested that enough corridors should be conserved in Hengduan mountains and the Three Parallel Rivers to protect biodiversity against climate change. Pixabay

They revealed that seasonal fluctuation of temperature and rainfall, rather than average annual temperature and rainfall, was one of the factors that determined the four taxa’s distribution, which means that extreme climate events are major threats to the species.

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According to the distribution patterns of abies showed in the study, the researchers suggested that enough corridors should be conserved in Hengduan mountains and the Three Parallel Rivers to protect biodiversity against climate change.

The study was published in the journal Ecology and Evolution. (IANS)