Monday November 19, 2018
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Hunt Continues for a 7-year-old boy left in the Japanese Forest as a punishment by Parents

During police investigations, the boy's parents have admitted that they had left him deliberately in the forest to “discipline” him for throwing stones at cars and people earlier in the day.

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Forest in Japan. Image source: Wikimedia Commons
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  • 7-year-old Yamato was left as a punishment in the forest
  • The boy disappeared in the mountains of Hokkaido, Japan 
  • 180 police officer and firefighter are searching for the 7 year old

The search for the 7 year old boy has entered its fourth day on Tuesday, as he disappeared in the bear inhabited mountains of Hokkaido, Japan. The boy was named Yamato Tanooka was left in the forest of Hokkaido by his parents as a punishment.

About 180 police officer and firefighter are searching for the 7 year old in the bear inhabited forest.

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Yamato’s parents initially claimed that their son has disappeared while they were picking wild vegetables but during police investigations, they have admitted that they had left him deliberately in the forest to “discipline” him for throwing stones at cars and people earlier in the day.

A map showing Hokaaido. Image source: Wikipedia
A map showing Hokaaido. Image source: Wikipedia

Yamato was asked to leave the car by his parents and they drove 500 metres and halted. But when the boy’s father walked back to collect him about five minutes later, he had disappeared. The boy was dressed in T-shirt and jeans with no food and water.

His father Takayuki in his comments said “I feel very sorry for my son. I am so sorry for causing trouble for so many people.”

The area where he disappeared is located on Japan’s northernmost main island of Hokkaido.

According to The Japan Times“His parents originally told the police that he got lost while the family was walking in the area to pick wild vegetables.

The boy’s 44-year-old father, Takayuki Tano-oka, eventually told the police they left the boy in the mountains on the way home from a park after scolding him for throwing stones at cars on a nearby road.

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“The parents left the boy in the mountains as punishment,’ the police spokesman said. ‘They said they went back to the site immediately, but the boy was no longer there.”

Many people took it twitter and said “I’m a parent too, so I understand (about discipline), but that was going way too far.”

“This is not punishment, but abuse!” read one post, while another said: “The parents are so stupid … I am speechless.”

-by Bhaskar Raghavendran

Bhaskar is a graduate in Journalism and mass communication and a reporter at NewsGram. Twitter handle: bhaskar_ragha

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Tech And Entertainment Industries Chase After Realistic Face Masks From Japan

Kitagawa said he works with clients carefully to ensure his products will not be used for illicit purposes.

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Face masks
REAL-f Co. President Osamu Kitagawa holds a super-realistic face mask at his factory in Otsu, western Japan. VOA

Super-realistic face masks made by a tiny company in rural Japan are in demand from the domestic tech and entertainment industries and from countries as far away as Saudi Arabia.

The 300,000-yen ($2,650) masks, made of resin and plastic by five employees at REAL-f Co., attempt to accurately duplicate an individual’s face down to fine wrinkles and skin texture.

Company founder Osamu Kitagawa came up with the idea while working at a printing machine manufacturer.

But it took him two years of experimentation before he found a way to use three-dimensional facial data from high-quality photographs to make the masks, and started selling them in 2011.

Face Masks
Super-realistic face masks are displayed at factory of REAL-f Co. in Otsu, western Japan. VOA

The company, based in the western prefecture of Shiga, receives about 100 orders every year from entertainment, automobile, technology and security companies, mainly in Japan.

For example, a Japanese car company ordered a mask of a sleeping face to improve its facial recognition technology to detect if a driver had dozed off, Kitagawa said.

“I am proud that my product is helping further development of facial recognition technology,” he added. “I hope that the developers would enhance face identification accuracy using these realistic masks.”

Kitagawa, 60, said he had also received orders from organizations linked to the Saudi government to create masks for the king and princes.

Face masks
Face off: Realistic masks made in Japan find demand from tech, car firms. 

“I was told the masks were for portraits to be displayed in public areas,” he said.

Kitagawa said he works with clients carefully to ensure his products will not be used for illicit purposes and cause security risks, but added he could not rule out such threats.

Also Read: Women In India Turn to Technology to Stay Safe From Harassment

He said his goal was to create 100 percent realistic masks, and he hoped to use softer materials, such as silicon, in the future.

“I would like these masks to be used for medical purposes, which is possible once they can be made using soft materials,” he said. “And as humanoid robots are being developed, I hope this will help developers to create [more realistic robots] at a low cost.” (VOA)