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Hyderabad food festival: Rich, tangy, spicy at Indyaki

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Hyderabad: The food festival of Hyderabad Royal Kitchens can be described as rich, tangy, spicy at the multi-cuisine Indyaki eatery at the Radisson Blue Hotel in Paschim Vihar.

On offer is an amalgamation of Mughlai, Turkish and Arabic food, derived from the princely legacy of the erstwhile nizams of Hyderabad state and is curated by Chef S K Saibjan, a master of the genre who has been specially brought down here from the southern city for the festival.

“Opened five years ago, Indyaki often comes up with various food festivals round the year to stand out in the midst of stiff competition,” Vivek Chandra Joshi, Indyaki’s assistant food and beverage manager said.

“These food festivals from across states ensure good business at the restaurant,” he says, adding: “On our way forward we want to explore such fests with the southern cuisines.”

“Providing new and authentic recipes from various regions brings us a new clientele base as well as sustains the existing one,” said Ranvir, the head chef at Indyaki.

The response to The Royal Kitchens of Hyderabad has so far been very good, Ranvir added.

Elaborating on Hyderabadi dishes, he said the cuisine emphasises the use of ingredients that are carefully chosen and cooked to the right degree of perfection. Among the condiments used in various delicacies are kabab cheen, pathar ke phool, chirounji, rose petals, sandal and pan ki jad.

Nuts, especially almonds, peanuts and cashew nuts, as also copra (dry coconut), have a major presence in the cuisine, Ranvir elaborated.

Sipping an Indyaki Punch cola, infused with rock salt, and garnished with mint and lemon actually makes you feel you are being punched and revived. I took a walk around the eatery to study its interiors.

The walls have various pictures showcasing the many cultural entities of Hyderabad city, making for a delightful and serene environment for foodies to savour the lip-smacking delicacies.

Then, it was time to sample the fare. First came the zaituni malai paneer tikka – paneer marinated in yogurt and spices, with the eternal mint chutney. Mutton seekh kebab, tender nizami murgh tikka and the crispy methi malai machi and gobhi65 followed in quick succession.

Surrounded by these gastronomical delights, I actually forgot all the tiredness of the day and worries of tomorrow. Also, a hope glimmered inside me – if the starters were so delicious, what would the main course be like?

Being a little biased towards non-vegetarian food, I quickly went to the counters serving them for the bouffet element of the fest.

Having heard a lot about the Hyderabadi biryani I delved straight into that.

“Kache ghosht ki biryani (lamb biryani) is raw mutton marinated with garam masala, degi mirch, brown onion, coriander powder, mint leaves and ginger garlic paste and kept for four hours and then cooked on the slow fire, in the famous dum cooking style,” Saibjan explained.

The tanginess of mirch ka salan, the mouthwatering chicken and mutton pickle accompanied the yummy biryani.

I next opted for a dish that was a great favourite of Chef Saibjan.

Haleem – made up of lentils, daliya, and meat – was completely new to me. Yet the very sight of it brought home to me the labour that went into making it.

Chef Saibjan said that haleem is made during Ramadan – the Muslim holy month of fasting – and is cooked on a slow fire for about 4-5 hours.

It is semi-liquid in form and when consumed before daybreak – when the fasting period begins – has the necessary proteins to keep one going for the 10-12 hours one has to remain without food or water.

“You need extra patience to cook haleem,” the chef said, adding: “Ithmenaan (patience) is the key and slow-cooking is the hallmark of Hyderabadi cuisine.”

Finally, catering to my sweet tooth were double ka meetha, which was, as the name suggests, doubly sweet; mauz ka meetha – bananas slow cooked with milk, sugar, cardamom and saffron; and gil-e-firdosh made up of bottle gourd cooked with thickened milk, sugar and garnished with elaichi and chopped dried fruit.

In a nutshell, the festival, which is on till February 22, is a must try if you want to indulge in a royal affair and for a mouthwatering experience at the Indyaki. (IANS)(image-2.bp.blogspot.com)

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India PC Market Shrinks 8% in Q1, HP Sells Most

Dell Inc retained the second position with a 25.9 per cent market share with a YoY growth of 2.2 per cent

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HP India
HP unveils 65-inch gaming display with soundbar at CES 2019. Flickr

With a market share of 28.1 per cent in the first quarter of 2019, HP Inc maintained its leadership position in the Indian personal computing (PC) market, which shrunk for the third straight quarter, the International Data Corporation (IDC) said on Thursday.

The market witnessed a year-on-year (YoY) drop of 8.3 per cent with shipments reaching 2.15 million units in the first quarter of 2019, said the report.

Despite maintaining its leadership position in the market, HP Inc saw a 9.7 per cent YoY decline, mainly due to consumer segment that shrunk 21.3 per cent over the first quarter of last year.

Dell Inc retained the second position with a 25.9 per cent market share with a YoY growth of 2.2 per cent and a quarter-on-quarter (QoQ) growth of 26.7 per cent.

HP
HP. (IANS)

Lenovo remained at third position with a market share of 25.2 per cent in Q1 of 2019 in India traditional PC market, observing a 6.2 per cent YoY growth and a 29.2 per cent sequential growth.

The India PC market remained weak outside big commercial deals due to weak consumer demand, high inventory from previous quarters and supply issues for Intel chips, IDC said.

Also Read- Tech Giant Apple Pledges to Alert Users on iPhone Performance

The notebook category contributing 61.4 per cent of the India PC market shipments witnessed a 9.8 per cent YoY decline. Within notebooks, ultra-slim category, with a 25.3 per cent share of the market, grew 86.5 per cent.

“Spending towards ultra-slim notebooks is increasing due to factors like improved mobility due to thinness of the product and enhanced aesthetics,” Bharath Shenoy, Market Analyst, PCs, IDC India, said in a statement. (IANS)