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Hypocrisy towards Terrorism is unacceptable, says India in UN Summit for Refugees and Migrants

In the UN Summit, Akbar recalled Mahatma Gandhi’s “seminal contribution” to abolishing indentured labor 100 years ago

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Refugee camp in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Wikimedia

Sept 20, 2016: By considering terrorism as an “existential threat,” Minster of State for External Affairs MJ Akbar at UN General Assembly’s first-ever Summit for Refugees and Migrants at the United Nations on Monday said that “It is important to stress that today the geopolitics of the crisis points and proves that terrorism is the principle cause of refugee movements. Can we ignore this fact, we cannot. We do so at our peril.”

Akbar asserted that “hypocrisy” towards the menace is unacceptable.

Since past few decades, terrorism has become a major cause of refugee movements.He emphasized that for the millions of people fleeing conflict, war, and poverty, terrorism is not characterized as good or bad.

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“There is no good terrorism or bad terrorism and if you do not know the answer to this question, all you have to do is ask the refugee if he considers any terrorism to be good or bad,” Akbar said.

Stressing that terrorism is the “biggest danger” to human rights, Akbar said large movements of people across borders serve as a reminder that the world has become a global village.

“We can only prosper or perish together, it is best that we learn to live in peace, prosperity, and amity,” he said.

Underlining that “prevention is better than cure”, Akbar said the international community has to address issues like terrorism, prevent armed conflict and facilitate development, which will help ensure people are not forced to flee their homeland.

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“We have to find out what drives them towards seeking refuge. Prevention is better than cure. Perhaps prevention is the only cure,” he said adding that preventing armed conflict, countering terrorism, building and sustaining peace to facilitating sustainable development and governance will prevent people from being forced to leave their homeland.

Terming the present refugee crisis as “unprecedented”, Akbar said the number of people on the move globally is estimated at close to 250 million or one in every 30 persons and three-fourths of all refugees come from just 11 countries.

Akbar noted that it is disconcerting that just seven countries host more than half of all refugees and now almost 90 per cent of all refugees are hosted in developing nations. He said it is wrong to assume that host nations do not want refugees.

“It is assumed that only host nations do not want refugees. I ask do refugees also want to become refugees. They don’t,” he said.

He said the problem of the refugee crisis has been with the world for a very long time.

“Refugees are as old as war. The first consequence of war is death and the second is refugees. There is another kind of person seeking a new haven — the migrant driven by a second cruelty, hunger or economic aspiration, and both phenomena are visible in the present crisis.”

Akbar referred to India’s “long history” of welcoming people seeking refuge from conflict, war, tyranny, and poverty.

“India offers refuge not because it has a large bank balance but because it has a large heart,” he said.

He cited the tumultuous year of 1971 when Bangladesh was fighting for independence and more than a million people from the neighboring nation took refuge in India to escape the “genocide” that they were facing at home.

“People seeking shelter in our country have never been turned back. Our record has been unique,” he said.

Akbar said nationalism is the “contemporary architecture” of stability and “we understand its importance.

“The intersection of human need in a refugee crisis and national imperatives make this a complex issue,” he added.

Akbar also recalled Mahatma Gandhi’s “seminal contribution” to abolishing indentured labor 100 years ago.

He said in more recent times, Indian migrants, including a cross-section of professionals, skilled and less-skilled workers, have migrated to countries around the world and offered a “positive contribution to the diaspora”.

He voiced India’s commitment to working with all partners beginning next year in developing a global compact to ensuring a safe and orderly migration that is in the interest of all people. 

-prepared by Aakash Mandyal of News Gram with inputs from PTI. Twitter: @Aakashsen6

  • Antara

    Hypocrisy at terrorism is an act of shame! A betrayal of humanity!

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Vietnam Offering Support to Rohingya Refugees in Bangladesh

Sustained aid from nations is necessary to continue WFP operations in Bangladesh, the UN agency warned

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Rohingya Muslims, who crossed over from Myanmar into Bangladesh, wade past a waterlogged path leading to the Jamtoli refugee camp in Ukhiya, Bangladesh. VOA

United Nations World Food Programme in Bangladesh said it welcomed a new contribution of $50,000 from Vietnam to support operations in Coxs Bazar – home to nearly one million Rohingya Muslim refugees from Myanmar.

“We are very grateful to Vietnam for stepping up to assist people living in Cox’s Bazar refugee camps,” said Richard Ragan, WFP Representative and Country Director, in a statement.

“This remains a serious humanitarian emergency, and continued support from the international community is vital if we are to keep providing the humanitarian assistance that is so badly needed.”

Vietnam’s new aid was announced by the Special Envoy of Prime Minister, Vice Minister for Foreign Affairs, Nguyen Quoc Dzung, during a visit to Bangladesh, according to WPF.

“Although this is a modest contribution, we are hopeful that our support will advance the response to this crisis situation,” he said.

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Rohingya women and children are seen at a temporary shelter in the Kalindi Kunj area of New Delhi, India, April 15, 2018. VOA

Vietnam joins dozens of other states who have pledged their support to the Cox’s Bazar response since the August 2017 refugee influx, said WFP, which provides food assistance to more than 870,000 refugees per month at the sprawling refugee settlement.

The UN agency also provides nutritional and livelihood support to the host community at Cox’s Bazaar, with the aim of helping the most vulnerable, WFP said.

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Sustained aid from nations is necessary to continue WFP operations in Bangladesh, the UN agency warned.

Over 750,000 Rohingya refugees have fled to Cox’s Bazar since August 2017 to escape persecution and violence by Myanmar’s military in Northern Rakhine State. Thousands of other Rohingya have fled to Bangladesh during previous periods of repression in Myanmar. (IANS)