Tuesday, May 11, 2021
Home Politics IAF's Rafale Deal with France: India confirms order

IAF’s Rafale Deal with France: India confirms order

New Delhi: With the confirmation of the order by the Indian government for 36 Rafale jets with the French government, the Indian Air Force’s quest for a Medium Multi-Role Combat Aircraft (MMRCA) was finally over.

According to sources, documents for the government-to-government deal were delivered by New Delhi to Paris on New Year’s eve, and the agreement is on the same lines as that for the Mirage 2000 aircraft signed in the early 1980s. IAF will buy all the Rafale aircraft from Dassault, the French aircraft builder and integrator, in a flyaway condition.

As the deal is between governments, the French authorities will ensure that Dassault complies with the terms of reference as it has successfully done in the case of Mirage 2000 — about 60 of which were delivered beginning 1985. The basic agreement was for 49 and 10 more were acquired later.

Significantly, this is the second deal for IAF – and Indian Army – within one week, the other being for Russian Kamov-31 helicopters signed on Christmas Eve with the Russian Government in Moscow during Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s visit there. That deal involves a substantial manufacturing of these machines in India as the number is large — more than 200.

It may be noted that originally IAF was to acquire 126 aircraft after the Rafale was selected in the MMRCA competition some time back, 18 in flyaway condition and 108 as progressively assembled and made in India by HAL under part Transfer of Technology (ToT). Private industry was to be involved, but HAL’s share was negotiated as more than 70 percent.

There were a lot of hiccups, over costs of the aircraft — over $100 million-plus per aircraft — and offsets from the Indian side and responsibility for the quality of production in India from the French side. Finally, keeping in mind IAF’s urgent requirements, the prime minister intervened to order 36 aircraft, or two squadrons, in a direct government-to-government deal during his visit to Paris in April.

This time, the deal involved no production in India but there were still some hiccups over the 50 percent stipulated offsets although aircraft costs would, by and large, have been the same as for the French Air Force (Armée de l’Air). Offset obligations would always be additional.

Modi, intervening again, spoke directly with French President Francois Hollande on a telephone in early September, and expressed difficulty in concluding the deal without the offsets. Hollande graciously agreed, and IAF approved the deal in mid-December. The Ministry of Defence (MoD) delivered a copy of the Inter-Government Agreement in this regard through the established diplomatic channels just as the New Year was set to begin.

Under the deal, Dassault and its main partners — engine maker Safran and electronic systems maker Thales — will share some technology with Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) and maybe some private sector companies and HAL under the offsets clause. Details are not known but as the aircraft have to be flown and maintained in India for at least three-to-four decades, a lot of information and technology upgrades will be needed to keep them operational.

The twin-engine Rafale combat jet is designed from the beginning as a multi-role fighter for air-to-air and air-to-ground attacks, is nuclear- capable and, thanks to its onboard Electronic Warfare (EW) systems, can also perform reconnaissance and radar jamming roles.

The deal involves delivery of aircraft to begin within three years of signing the agreement — 2018-end in this case — but French industry sources told this writer some time back in Paris that Dassault had started planning for the Indian order from mid-2015 itself, and “maybe the deliveries could be faster if required.”

Last year had been lucky for Dassault as the Rafale has also been selected by Egypt and Qatar while the UAE is considering it seriously.

There are suddenly too many orders, and the only way to meet them is to divert the French Air Force requirements for the next few years. That is being done.(Gulshan Luthra, IANS) 

STAY CONNECTED

19,511FansLike
362FollowersFollow
1,773FollowersFollow

Most Popular

Knowledge Sharing Social Media Platform For Medical Students: MedBound

We've already been using major social networking sites for different purposes. Well, there are also some social networking sites that aren't to be missed...

Covid19 In India Brought Automation Technologies And IA To The Forefront

The Covid-19 pandemic has brought automation technologies to the forefront and the Intelligent Automation (IA) market in India is estimated to grow at a...

Corset: A Brief History

By- Khushi Bisht Corsets have existed for a very long time. It first originated in Italy and was brought to France in the 16th century...

Hybrid Work Is The Next Big Disruption In US Society

By Dora Mekouar Hybrid schedules could be the next monumental shift in the American workplace after last year's sudden move to remote work. More than 70%...

An Overview Of Bipolar Disorder

BY- JAYA CHOUDHARY Bipolar disorder, also known as bipolar depressive disorder, is a neurological disorder that causes mood and behavior changes. Bipolar disorder is characterized...

Cancer Immunotherapy Approach Targets Common Genetic Alteration

By Blake Jones Researchers have found a prototype for a new kind of immunotherapy for cancer. This therapy uses modified T-cells to target and attack...

Outlook Into Wellness Tourism Growth During Pandemic

The roller coaster ride that was 2020 brought the biggest dip in modern history, forcing individuals to adapt to major lifestyle changes while the...

Strengthen Your Immune System Against Foreign Pathogens

At the personal level, the fight against the Covid-19 virus begins with strong immunity. As the second wave turns out to be more alarming...

Recent Comments