Friday December 13, 2019

ICU Care from far: How India is solving its problem of doctors shortage

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Doctors remotely monitor live footages of patients inside an electronic intensive care unit (eICU) at Fortis hospital in New Delhi, India, January 20, 2016. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi
A doctor remotely monitors live footage of patients inside an electronic intensive care unit (eICU) at Fortis hospital in New Delhi, India, January 20, 2016. Picture taken January 20, 2016. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi
A doctor remotely monitors live footage of patients inside an electronic intensive care unit (eICU) at Fortis hospital in New Delhi, India, January 20, 2016. Picture taken January 20, 2016. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi

By Aditya Kalra

NEW DELHI (Reuters) – A doctor at a hospital in India’s capital, New Delhi, was recently tracking a wall of monitors displaying the vital signs of intensive care patients admitted hundreds of miles away when red-and-yellow alerts rang out.

The oxygen flow to a 67-year-old patient had stopped when no critical care doctors were present in a hospital in the northern city of Amritsar.

But the doctor in the New Delhi centre run by Fortis Healthcare quickly issued a set of instructions and stopped the patient from suffering brain damage or death, the Indian hospital chain said in an account of the episode.

India’s top private hospitals, seizing on a shortage of critical-care doctors, are expanding into the remote management of intensive care units around the country and, starting this month, in neighbouring Bangladesh too.

India has seven doctors for every 10,000 people, half the global average, according to the World Health Organization. Data from the Indian Medical Association shows the country needs more than 50,000 critical care specialists but has just 8,350.

Such a shortage of doctors means small facilities in India’s $55 billion private hospital market are ill equipped to provide critical care even as numbers seeking private healthcare rise because the public health system is in even worse shape.

India’s largest healthcare chain, Apollo Hospitals Enterprise, and Fortis will this year expand their network of electronic intensive care units (eICUs), scaling up operations thanks to advances in communications technology.

“We want to leverage (doctors) using technology,” said K. Hari Prasad, head of hospitals business at Apollo that employs more than 700 critical care doctors.

Apollo, which monitors 200 patients in six states from its only eICU in Hyderabad city, will open three new centres to track 1,000 more patients. Prasad said he is also in talks to extend the service to government hospitals.

Fortis will start remote monitoring of intensive care patients in the Bangladeshi city of Khulna this week, its first such cross-border operation. The hospital chain tracks 350 patients from its New Delhi centre but will start two more eICUs by mid-2017.

Jayant Singh, director of healthcare at Frost & Sullivan India, a consultancy, estimates that eICUs are boosting industry revenues by $220 million a year by giving smaller hospitals the ability to treat critical patients at the hands of top-flight intensive-care specialists, even if they are in another city.

India’s eICU beds will expand by 15-20 percent each year from about 3,000 now, Singh said.

SAVING LIVES

With multiple computer screens inside these high-tech eICUs, doctors suggest treatment procedures after assessing medical history and real-time heart rate charts of patients fighting for their lives in distant facilities.

Doctors recently saved a 30-year-old pregnant woman in a hospital in the southern city of Warangal after her heart stopped beating, assisting a resident doctor not specialised in intensive care to carry out chest compressions through a video link.

“We save about 25 lives a month,” said Shamit Gupta, medical director at Fortis’ eICU unit.

Hospitals charge between $10 and $30 a day to virtually monitor a patient from their eICUs, with revenues shared between hospitals and companies such as General Electric and Philips that have developed the tracking software.

That comes on top of standard critical care costs of about $200 a day in a small city hospital.

At that price, eICUs do little to address concerns of millions of India’s poor patients who often share beds or wait for days to gain admission to a public hospital.

“This technology basically is not bridging the gap between the poor and the rich, but increasing access to specialized healthcare for those who can afford it,” Frost & Sullivan’s Singh said.

(Reporting by Aditya Kalra; Editing by Sanjeev Miglani, Robert Birsel)

  • Rakesh Manchanda

    Indian doctors in lobby with politicians have insulated themselves with conflict of interest.They need to be courageous to help break this deadlock and seek solutions while inviting health awareness groups to connect to humanity is spite of Rich-Poor patient divide.

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  • Rakesh Manchanda

    Indian doctors in lobby with politicians have insulated themselves with conflict of interest.They need to be courageous to help break this deadlock and seek solutions while inviting health awareness groups to connect to humanity is spite of Rich-Poor patient divide.

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Adobe Photoshop on iPad Provides New Opportunities to Youngsters in India

Adobe has also made it possible to import photos directly from your SD card or USB drive into the iOS version of Lightroom

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Although Adobe Photoshop on iPad was completely done in the US, the incremental syncing part was achieved in India. IANS

Thirty years and still going strong, Adobe Photoshop remains the most loved design tool for creators and professional designers. Now, iPad lovers in India are thrilled to try their hands on the software tool and let their imaginations fly.

Photoshop on iPad allows young users to craft composites with fingers and retouch images with Apple Pencil. Your PSDs will remain the same, whether you’re working on desktop or iPad.

Adobe Photoshop that arrived on iPads globally in November brings core compositing and retouching workflows to iPad.

For the millennials, this is a great opportunity to become a creative pro as Photoshop on iPad is an intuitive, more accessible entry point to the Adobe tool for new users.

It features full PSD (Photoshop document files) interoperability, a touch-based user interface (UI), Cloud document access, and the power to work on real-world, multi-layered creations.

“We’re excited to push the frontiers of creativity to make everyone more productive and express their creative vision — not only seasoned professionals, but also the next generation of designers, photographers, filmmakers and illustrators,” Scott Belsky, Chief Product Officer and Executive Vice President, Creative Cloud, Adobe, told the gathering at the recently-concluded Adobe Max conference in Los Angeles.

Adobe
Thirty years and still going strong, Adobe Photoshop remains the most loved design tool for creators and professional designers. Now, iPad lovers in India are thrilled to try their hands on the software tool and let their imaginations fly. Pixabay

Open up full-size PSDs on your desktop or iPad and store them in the cloud – no conversion necessary.

You get the same fidelity, power, and performance no matter what device you’re working on, even when you’re designing with thousands of layers.

“Use quick gestures and touch shortcuts to make edits directly on your canvas and speed up your workflow. With context-aware user interface (UI), you display only the core tools and panes you need, so you can focus on your canvas, not the clutter,” says Adobe.

Next up is Adobe Illustrator which is slated to arrive on iPad next year. The teams at Adobe’s Noida R&D centre and Apple’s Cupertino-based headquarters in the US are busy finalizing and preparing for the final release of the much-anticipated product.

“We are already doing complete R&D for Illustrator and InDesign. The upcoming Illustrator on iPad, which has received rave reviews, is entirely being done at our Noida R&D centre,” Shanmugh Natarajan, MD and VP of Product at Adobe India, told IANS recently.

The company has previewed Adobe Illustrator’s future with a reimagined touch-based app that brings the precision and versatility of the desktop experience to iPad.

Although Adobe Photoshop on iPad was completely done in the US, the incremental syncing part was achieved in India.

Adobe has also made it possible to import photos directly from your SD card or USB drive into the iOS version of Lightroom. Previously, users had to import images to their camera roll, then copy them over into Lightroom’s library.

Adobe
Adobe Photoshop on iPad allows young users to craft composites with fingers and retouch images with Apple Pencil. Your PSDs will remain the same, whether you’re working on desktop or iPad. Pixabay

Here are the plans for Indian lovers who want Adobe experience on their iPads. The “Photography (20GB)” plan with Lightroom, Lightroom Classic, and Photoshop is available for Rs 676 a month (excluding GST). If you purchase this plan by January 31, you get Photoshop on iPad for free.

In the “Adobe Photoshop Single App” plan, get Photoshop on desktop and iPad as part of Creative Cloud for Rs 1,420.

ALSO READ: Use of Information Technology Can Save Police Personnel from Death in Line of Duty

For the “All Apps” plan, get Photoshop on desktop and iPad, plus the entire collection of creative apps for Rs 3,585.

Students and teachers can save over 60 per cent on the entire collection of Creative Cloud apps for just Rs 1,353. (IANS)