Monday December 17, 2018

An Initiative For Population Control and Child’s Welfare on ‘World Population Day’

Emphasizing the need for population control and the significance of The World Population Day

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FOGSI and IMA come together to discuss birth control measures. VOA
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  • FOGSI in collaboration with IMA discuss the changing patterns of contraception
  • Population control and the need for a proper family planning
  • An initiative to discuss intricate relationship between family planning and development of the nation

New Delhi, July 12, 2017: Emphasizing the significance of 11th July as World Population Day, 242 societies induced by the Federation of Obstetric and Gynaecological Societies of India (FOGSI) came together with 3 lakh doctors of the Indian Medical Association (IMA) to discuss about the shifting pattern of contraception methods available today. Their motto was to empower people by spreading awareness among them about the varied ways of family planning and thus the development of the nation, as reported by ANI.

Samaj Swasthya, a magazine started by Raghunath Dhondo Karve as early as 1927. In it, he discussed society’s well-being as a consequence of population control. He argued for every women’s control over their own lives through the path of birth control.

According to ‘Vision FP 2020’, a proper family planning can keep at bay 2.39 crore births and 42,000 maternal deaths by 2020. This will, in turn, lead to an even dispersion of hygiene, nutrition and will help to eliminate malnutrition, poverty and deaths by starvation.

Also Read: World Population Day: Is it time to control population explosion in India?

Padma Shri Awardee Dr K K Aggarwal, National President Indian Medical Association and President Heart Care Foundation of India and Dr RN Tandon – Honorary Secretary General IMA, on this opportunity speaks about the significance of the knowledge that people should have at their disposal about “the varied and effective contraception choices”. Irreversible tubectomy, reversible long-acting spacing methods of contraception such as the intrauterine device among others. He discussed at length about injectable contraceptives. Dr Aggarwal aims towards alleviating myths and misconceptions about contraceptives and also create awareness on safe family planning methods.

Population control
Contraceptive pills. VOA

India is ranked 2nd in the category of world’s most populated countries with most of the women not being fully educated on contraception usages and importances.

Dr Rishma Dhillon Pai – President and Dr Hrishikesh D Pai – Secretary General, Federation of Obstetric and Gynaecological Societies of India (FOGSI) in a joint statement shared, “In 2015, over 7 lakh abortions were recorded, which resulted from unwanted pregnancies – as an outcome of the unmet need for contraceptives”. India is in dire need of family planning services

“Our aim is to keep the Total Fertility Rate (TFR) of the Indian population to 2.1. Out of 36 states and Union territories of India, 24 of them have already achieved the TFR of 2.1 or less.” contends SK Sikdar, Deputy Commissioner and HOD, Family planning division of Union Health Ministry.

– prepared by Puja Sinha of NewsGram. Twitter @pujas1994

 

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Trump Can’t Deny Birth Control Coverage: U.S. Court

The case became more complicated after the Trump administration last month issued new birth control coverage rules that are set to supersede those at issue in the lawsuit before the 9th Circuit.

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birth control, contraceptive
A one-month dosage of hormonal birth control pills is displayed in Sacramento, Calif. VOA

A divided U.S. appeals court Thursday blocked rules by the Trump administration that allowed more employers to opt out of providing women with no-cost birth control.

The ruling, however, may be short lived because the administration has adopted new rules on contraceptive coverage that are set to take effect next month and will likely prompt renewed legal challenges.

Thursday’s ruling by a three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals concerned changes to birth control coverage requirements under President Barack Obama’s health care law that the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services issued in October 2017.

States were likely to succeed on their claim that those changes were made without required notice and public comment, the appeals court panel said in a 2-1 decision.

USA, birth control
A man stands outside the main door of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals building in San Francisco. VOA

The majority upheld a preliminary injunction against the rules issued by U.S. District Judge Haywood Gilliam last year. It, however, limited the scope of the injunction, applying it only to the five states in the lawsuit and not the entire country.

Another federal judge also blocked the rules, and her nationwide injunction remains in place.

An email to the Justice Department seeking comment was not immediately returned.

Obama’s health care law required most companies to cover birth control at no additional cost, though it included exemptions for religious organizations. The new policy allowed more categories of employers, including publicly traded companies, to opt out of providing free contraception to women by claiming religious objections. It also allowed any company that is not publicly traded to deny coverage on moral grounds.

The Department of Justice said in court documents that the rules were about protecting a small group of “sincere religious and moral objectors” from having to violate their beliefs. The changes were favored by social conservatives who are staunch supporters of President Donald Trump.

Reproductive Rights, abortion, women, birth control
A community health worker holds up contraceptives during a lecture on family planning at a reproductive health clinic run by an NGO in Tondo city, metro Manila. VOA

California filed a lawsuit to block the changes that was joined by Delaware, Maryland, New York and Virginia.

“Today’s decision is an important step to protect a woman’s right to access cost-free birth control and make independent decisions about her own reproductive health care,” California Attorney General Xavier Becerra said in a statement.

‘Economic harm’

The states argued that the changes could result in millions of women losing free birth control services, forcing them to seek contraceptive care through state-run programs or programs that the states had to reimburse.

The states show with “reasonable probability” that the new rules will lead women to lose employer-sponsored contraceptive coverage, “which will then result in economic harm to the states,” 9th Circuit Judge J. Clifford Wallace, a nominee of Republican President Richard Nixon, wrote for the majority.

Reproductive Rights, abortion, women, birth control
Newer Contraception Tries to Engage Men. VOA

In a dissent, 9th Circuit Judge Andrew Kleinfeld said the economic harm to the states was “self-inflicted” because they chose to provide contraceptive coverage to women. The states, therefore, did not have the authority to bring the lawsuit, said Kleinfeld, a nominee of Republican President George H.W. Bush.

Also Read: To Diversify The Industry, Apple Pledges To Train More Women

The case became more complicated after the Trump administration last month issued new birth control coverage rules that are set to supersede those at issue in the lawsuit before the 9th Circuit. Under the new rules, large companies whose stock is sold to investors won’t be able to opt out of providing contraceptive coverage.

Wallace said the new rules did not make the case before the 9th Circuit moot because they are not set to take effect until January. (VOA)