Tuesday November 19, 2019
Home Politics Imran Khan wa...

Imran Khan wants President Donald Trump to extend US Travel Ban to Pakistan

The controversial U.S. ban currently applies to Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen

0
//
FILE - Pakistan’s leading opposition politician Imran Khan, seen in this file photo, is urging President Donald Trump to ban Pakistanis from entering the United States, after he suspended immigration from seven Muslim majority countries. VOA

USA, Jan 30, 2017: Pakistan’s leading opposition politician, Imran Khan, is urging President Donald Trump to ban Pakistanis from entering the United States, after he suspended immigration from seven Muslim-majority countries.

The controversial U.S. ban currently applies to Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen.

Addressing a rally in the central Pakistani town of Sahiwal on Sunday, Khan denounced the ban as anti-Muslim and praised Iran for its retaliatory action of banning Americans from entering the Islamic Republic.

“I want to tell all my fellow Pakistanis today, I pray that Donald Trump really bans visas for us.” Khan said, suggesting that such a move could help prevent brain drain from Pakistan.

Check out NewsGram for latest international news updates.

He went on to urge educated and skilled Pakistani youth to abandon U.S. travel plans in search of a better economic future, and to focus instead on building Pakistan.

“And then if America tells us they are stopping visas for us we will also, like Iran, tell them we are going to stop visas for Americans,” Khan vowed.

Khan’s Pakistan Tehrik-e-Insaf party is the third major political force in the national parliament, and rules the country’s northwestern Khyber-Pakhtunkhaw province.

Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif’s government has not yet commented about Trump’s ban on Muslim countries.

Officials in Islamabad are hoping for improvement in their usually uneasy relations with Washington under the Trump presidency.

Pakistan’s alleged support for anti-Afghanistan and anti-India Islamist militant groups sheltering on its soil has been a major irritant in tensions with Washington.

NewsGram brings to you current foreign news from all over the world.

On Sunday, White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus hinted that Pakistan could be included in the list of countries from which immigration has been banned.

“You can point to other countries that have similar problems like Pakistan and others — perhaps we need to take it further.” Priebus told CBS News. (VOA)

Next Story

Cigarette Smoking Among U.S. Adults Recorded Lowest Ever

This marked decline in cigarette smoking is the achievement of a consistent and coordinated effort by the public health community and our many partners

0
Cigarette, Smoking, United States
CDC report found, nearly 1 in 5 or some 49 million U.S. adults used some form of tobacco product in 2018. VOA

Cigarette smoking among American adults fell to an all-time low last year, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

The report, out Thursday, said 13.7% of adults smoked cigarettes in 2018, a dramatic drop from the 42% adult smoking rate in 1965, when the CDC began keeping records.

“This marked decline in cigarette smoking is the achievement of a consistent and coordinated effort by the public health community and our many partners,” CDC Director Robert Redfield said. “Yet, our work is far from over.”

Overall, the report found, nearly 1 in 5 or some 49 million U.S. adults used some form of tobacco product in 2018, with cigarettes being the most common.

Cigarette, Smoking, United States
The report, out Thursday, said 13.7% of adults smoked cigarettes in 2018, a dramatic drop from the 42% adult smoking rate in 1965, when the CDC began keeping records. Pixabay

While the number of cigarette smokers declined, the share of those using e-cigarettes jumped to 3.2% from 2.8% in 2017. That increase was attributed to young adults between the ages of 18 and 24.

Also Read- Now Flipkart to Collect Plastic Packaging from Doorstep

The report found tobacco use was the highest among men; minorities, including those who are LGBTQ; people living in the Midwest or the South; and those earning less than $35,000 per year. (VOA)