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In the wake of terror, UN Watch too castigates Pakistan, Iran, and Burma for violation of Women’s Rights in one of its Minority Forum Session

Article 26 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights consider education to be a basic human right

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Wome being used as carriers of Islamic Militant attacks Images source:Wikimedia Commons
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August 27, 2016: When a human is tagged and discriminated on the basis of religion and gender, humanity dies right at that moment. UN Watch, whose stated mission is “to monitor the performance of the United Nations by the yardstick of its own Charter” has come up with the list of countries which are a shame on humanity.

Article 26 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights consider education to be a basic human right. Access to education in many parts of the world is challenging, but it is especially difficult in areas where minority women face bigotry because of their gender and their status as a minority.

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In one of its UN Minority Forum sessions of Human Rights Council, UN Watch too had focussed on the issues related to discrimination against minority women in certain countries, under the agenda of Right to education. An intern with the UN watch, Angela Farmer pointed out that Iran, Pakistan, and Burma; routinely discriminate against women belonging to minority groups of their respective countries.

Pakistan has a history of sectarian attacks, which continue with impunity, particularly against minorities. Hindu girls bear the brunt of religious discriminations and face massive obstacles on their way to education.

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Female teachers often face threats from militants, and the schools open for women are less than 25% of the total number of schools in Pakistan. There are holidays for Muslim and Christian festivals but not for Hindus.  Some regions do not allow educations to girls at all citing “religious beliefs” as the reason.

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The discrimination against Baha’i women in Iran is of grave concern, which has caught the attention as well as received criticism of both, Mr. Ban-ki moon, the UN-secretary, and the UN general assembly’s third Committee- which deals with human rights. While Muslim women have access to education; Baha’i women are barred from the university education.

Burma persecutes women of Muslim minority groups of Rohingyas, denying them citizenship. The Rohingyas women have been inflicted upon with atrocities by the government itself. Mass military rapes of Rohingyas have been reported by the Freedom House, a US-based research agency. Due to Fear of their lives, many Rohingyas women have fled to Bangladesh. The special rapporteur on human rights in Burma has expressed serious concern for the Rohingyas population, referring to “Endemic discrimination against the Muslim minority.”

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Earth Will Reach 1.5 Degrees Above Pre-Industrial Levels By 2030

Countries in the southern hemisphere will be among the worse off.

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An aerial view of downtown San Francisco, California

The UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) on Monday said the planet will reach the crucial threshold of 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels by 2030, precipitating the risk of extreme drought, wildfires, floods and food shortages for hundreds of millions of people.

In a report, the IPCC said that governments around the world must take “rapid, far-reaching and unprecedented changes in all aspects of society” to avoid disastrous levels of global warming, CNN reported.

The date, which falls well within the lifetime of many people alive today, is based on current levels of greenhouse gas emissions.

The planet is already two-thirds of the way there, with global temperatures having warmed about 1 degree Celsius. Avoiding going even higher will require significant action in the next few years, the report said.

climate, global warming, celsisu
A fisherman stands on his boat as he fishes at the Tisma lagoon wetland park, also designated as Ramsar Site 1141 in the Convention on Wetlands, in Tisma, Nicaragua. VOA

Global net emissions of carbon dioxide would need to fall by 45 per cent from 2010 levels by 2030 and reach “net zero” around 2050 in order to keep the warming around 1.5 degrees Celsius.

Lowering emissions to this degree, while technically possible, would require widespread changes in energy, industry, buildings, transportation and cities, according to the report.

“One of the key messages that comes out very strongly from this report is that we are already seeing the consequences of 1 degree Celsius of global warming through more extreme weather, rising sea levels and diminishing Arctic sea ice, among other changes,” said Panmao Zhai, co-chair of IPCC Working Group I.

Coral reefs will also be drastically effected, with between 70 and 90 per cent expected to die off, including Australia’s Great Barrier Reef.

climate, global warming, celsisus
Waves from Hurricane Florence pound the Bogue Inlet Pier in Emerald Isle, N.C. VOA

Countries in the southern hemisphere will be among the worse off, the report said, adding “projected to experience the largest impacts on economic growth due to climate change should global warming increase”.

“Every extra bit of warming matters, especially since warming of 1.5 degrees C or higher increases the risk associated with long-lasting or irreversible changes, such as the loss of some eco-systems,” CNN quoted Hans-Otto Pörtner, Co-Chair of IPCC Working Group II, as saying.

Monday’s report is three years in the making and is a direct result of the 2015 Paris Climate Agreement.

Also Read: Paris Adopts Climate Action Plan, Aims At Achieving A ‘Zero Carbon’ Future

In the Paris accord, 197 countries agreed to the goal of holding global temperatures “well below” 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels and to pursue efforts to limit it to 1.5 degrees Celsius.

More than 90 authors from 40 countries were involved in leading the report, helped by 133 contributing authors. (IANS)