Tuesday April 7, 2020

India among 14 nations to train students on climate change

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Washington: The White House today informed that India, France, China and Britain are among 14 countries who will train students on climate change and its impacts on health.

From these 14 countries, 48 medical, public health and nursing schools committed to give training to their students. This put the total number of schools in the world teaching climate change to 118, said the White House.

In India, two centers of Indian Institute of Public Health, including one in Bhubaneshwar, have taken up this objective.

The White House will make an official announcement in this regard on the sidelines of the ongoing Paris Climate Summit.

The present decision to train students on climate change is an expansion of a previous initiative towards this end. The White House said that US President Barrack Obama is committed to this global challenge, which needs a global response.

The 14 additional countries joining the move are Australia, Canada, China, Grenada, Ecuador, Finland, France, India, Malaysia, Mexico, Singapore, South Africa, Switzerland and United Kingdom.

A Global Consortium on Climate and Health Education will be formed to implement the working of the Health Educators Climate Commitment, as would soon be announced by the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, which is helping in recruiting peer institutions.

The Consortium will also act as a forum, through which, schools around the world dealing with health and medicine would be able to share scientific and educational knowledge and practices; develop a curriculum and core knowledge set; and work on ways to develop academic partnerships on a global platform to support professional health training, especially in countries which are under-resourced, said the White House.

Climate change cannot be ignored anymore as a concern for the future generation, and all nations must work together towards this issue as none are immune to its effects. This is what the Paris talks on climate change are all about, it asserted.

“Today’s commitments reinforce not only how vast the impacts of climate change are, but also the opportunity to join together and address this problem,” it said.

Next Story

Ice Loss in Antarctica and Greenland Increasing at an Alarming Rate: Scientists

Greenland, Antarctica ice loss accelerating

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Ice loss
Earth's great ice sheets, Greenland and Antarctica, were now losing mass six times faster than they were in the 1990s due to warming conditions. Pixabay

Earth’s great ice sheets, Greenland and Antarctica, were now losing mass six times faster than they were in the 1990s due to warming conditions, the media reported on Thursday citing scientists as saying.

A comprehensive review of satellite data acquired at both poles was unequivocal in its assessment of accelerating trends, the BBC quoted the scientists as saying.

Between them, Greenland and Antarctica lost 6.4 trillion tonnes of ice in the period from 1992 to 2017.

Ice loss
The combined rate of ice loss for Greenland and Antarctica was running at about 81 billion tonnes per year in the 1990s. Pixabay

This was sufficient to push up global sea-levels up by 17.8 mm, the scientists added. “That’s not a good news story,” said Professor Andrew Shepherd from the University of Leeds.

“Today, the ice sheets contribute about a third of all sea-level rise, whereas in the 1990s, their contribution was actually pretty small at about 5 per cent. This has important implications for the future, for coastal flooding and erosion,” he told BBC News.

The researcher co-leads a project called the Ice Sheet Mass Balance Intercomparison Exercise, or Imbie, which is a team of experts who have reviewed polar measurements acquired by observational spacecraft over nearly three decades.

The Imbie team’s studies have revealed that ice losses from Antarctica and Greenland were actually heading to much more pessimistic outcomes, and will likely add another 17 cm to those end-of-century forecasts.

“If that holds true it would put 400 million people at risk of annual coastal flooding by 2100,” Professor Shepherd told the BBC.

Also Read- People of All Generation Can Feel Lonely for Different Reasons: Research

The combined rate of loss for Greenland and Antarctica was running at about 81 billion tonnes per year in the 1990s.

By the 2010s, it had climbed to 475 billion tonnes per year. (IANS)