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India is Confident of China’s Support for Nuclear Group Membership

China said, "large differences" remain over the issue of countries that have not signed the NPT joining the NSG

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Indian External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj addresses a press conference in New Delhi, India, June 19, 2016. Image source: AP
  • New Delhi has overcome resistance from several countries such as Mexico and Switzerland
  • China is not opposing India’s entry into the Nuclear Suppliers Group, but that it has raised objections relating to criteria and processes
  • With backup from US, India is lobbying hard before a key meeting in Seoul on June 23 to gain entry into the elite club

India is optimistic that China will not block its bid for membership of the Nuclear Supplier Group, the 48 countries controlling nuclear commerce and sensitive technology.  With the backing of the United States, India has been lobbying hard before a key meeting in Seoul on June 23 to gain entry into the elite club.

In recent weeks, New Delhi has overcome resistance from several countries such as Mexico and Switzerland, but Beijing is on the frontline of a tiny group of countries that continue to express reservations about opening the NSG’s doors to India because it has not signed the Nuclear Non Proliferation Treaty (NPT).

Talking to reporters on Sunday, June 19, India’s foreign minister Sushma Swaraj appeared confident of overcoming Chinese resistance.  “We are hopeful that we will be successful in getting China’s support,” she said.

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Swaraj told reporters that China is not opposing India’s entry into the Nuclear Suppliers Group, but that it has raised objections relating to criteria and processes.  “In India’s case, instead of criteria, its credentials should be taken into account,” she said.

Prime Minister of India Narendra Modi arrives for a bilateral meeting with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau (not pictured) at the Nuclear Security Summit, Friday, April 1, 2016, in Washington. Image source: Sean Kilpatrick/The Canadian Press via AP
Prime Minister of India Narendra Modi arrives for a bilateral meeting with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau (not pictured) at the Nuclear Security Summit, Friday, April 1, 2016, in Washington. Image source: Sean Kilpatrick/The Canadian Press via AP

India’s top diplomat conveyed that message to China during an unexpected visit Saturday, June 18, to woo Beijing.

China has said that “large differences” remain over the issue of countries that have not signed the NPT joining the NSG.

But an optimistic Swaraj expressed hope that “consensus is being built and maybe no country will break this consensus and we will get membership of NSG.”

Some controls

Although New Delhi has not signed the NPT, it has committed to some controls on its nuclear program under a 2008 deal with the United States. That deal effectively ended the isolation imposed on India since a 1998 nuclear test and gave it access to nuclear fuel and technology.

Analysts say, India’s dream of getting membership of the elite club is more about gaining a seat at the nuclear high table as it seeks to raise its global profile than any actual benefits.  They point out that New Delhi already has deals with more than eight countries either for supplies of uranium or for building power plants.

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Opponents say giving India membership will undermine efforts to prevent nuclear proliferation, which the NSG aims to do by restricting the sale of items that can be used to make arms.  It will also infuriate arch-rival Pakistan, which has also made a bid for membership of the NSG.

Asked whether China was linking India’s membership of the nuclear group with that of Pakistan, Swaraj said that each country’s membership should be decided on merit. (VOA)

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  • Vrushali Mahajan

    whether we get into NSG or not should surely be decided on merit. Plus, India is a developing country, when you give chances to such countries, it tries to become more and more developed.

Next Story

WhatsApp and NASSCOM To Come Up With Digital Literacy Training To Curb Fake News

"This training educates people throughout India to be mindful of the messages they receive and to verify the facts before forwarding,"

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The first training will be on March 27 in Delhi and will be followed by more planned interventions like hosting training workshops for representatives from rural and urban areas along with roadshows across numerous colleges. Pixabay

As part of the partnership, WhatsApp and NASSCOM Foundation will train nearly 1,00,000 Indians to spot false information and provide tips and tricks to stay safe on WhatsApp.

The co-created curriculum, which includes real-world anecdote tools that can be used to verify a forwarded message and actions that users can take like reporting problematic content to fact checkers and other law enforcement agencies, will be disseminated in multiple regional languages.

“We are excited to expand our partnerships with civil society to advance crucial digital literacy skills that can help combat misinformation share on WhatsApp,” Abhijit Bose, Head of India, WhatsApp, said in a statement.

“This training educates people throughout India to be mindful of the messages they receive and to verify the facts before forwarding,” he added.

The training will be imparted by volunteers from NASSCOM Foundation who will launch the “each one teach three” campaign that mandates every volunteer to share their learnings with three more persons leading to a network effect.

These volunteers will post their takeaways from the workshops on their social media handles to increase the reach of these safety messages.

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As part of the partnership, WhatsApp and NASSCOM Foundation will train nearly 1,00,000 Indians to spot false information and provide tips and tricks to stay safe on WhatsApp.
Pixabay

The first training will be on March 27 in Delhi and will be followed by more planned interventions like hosting training workshops for representatives from rural and urban areas along with roadshows across numerous colleges.

“The use of technology platforms like WhatsApp are inherently meant to foster social good, harmony, and collaboration, but are sadly being used by a small number of miscreants to entice anger and hatred by spreading false and doctored information,” Ashok Pamidi, CEO, NASSCOM Foundation, said.

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“This training educates people throughout India to be mindful of the messages they receive and to verify the facts before forwarding,” he added. Pixabay

Also Read: New Zealand’s Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern Claims, Cabinet Has Given Nod to Reform Gun Law

“I would like to urge all the connected citizens who want to join this fight against the spread of fake information, to come and help volunteer towards the cause,” Pamidi added.

Aspiring volunteers can register at www.mykartavya.nasscomfoundation.org

NASSCOM Foundation is the social arm of the industry body, National Association of Software and Services Companies (NASSCOM). (IANS)