Wednesday November 20, 2019
Home India India Should ...

India Should Crack Down Upon The Terror Sympathizers Within The Country

The road to a victory must be undisclosed. More so, when our enemies within the country are more insidious, more intelligent, more brutal and more warlike

0
//
india
They have systematically misled and “incited” millions of our Indians to voice against the Indian ethos, sometimes directly and sometimes indirectly. But mind, all these formidable forces are sweet-hearts of the media.

By: Salil Gewali

After the terrible Pulwama attack by Pakistan sponsored terrorists, India is apparently standing up. Yes, it is practically gearing towards the better strategies to “hit the evil heads”. True, the realization that the enemies are getting more “brutal” and more inhumane than ever before should make India realistic and visionary. Of course, our “battles” to fight against are many, because the adversaries are of various kinds.  While India should send its army deep into the terrorists’ hideouts in Pakistan, India should also “spare its thought” in dealing with those forces who eat, drink and luxuriate in the facilities provided by India, but their hearts ache for something others. There are an increasing number of forces which even try to disestablish the nation and its integrity.

What more? When the questions of sedition are raised against those dangerous forces then the media comes forward to denounce the whole country. Are Kanhaiya  Kumar, Umar Khalid, Anirban Bhattacharya, Shehla Rashid Shora, Mr. Jignesh Mewani, Arundhati Roy, Rajdeep Sardesai, Mehbooba Mufti, Omar Abdulla,.. ….  and lot many other leaders from Kashmir….. not inciting our youths?

JNU
There are an increasing number of forces which even try to disestablish the nation and its integrity.

                 They have systematically misled and “incited” millions of our Indians to voice against the Indian ethos, sometimes directly and sometimes indirectly. But mind, all these formidable forces are sweet-hearts of the media. The “treacherous adventures” of those people make the majority of Indian intellectuals cheerier and lustier! Each anti-nationalist “scream” by these elements never get wasted. It is effectively used to degrade the nation, demean the culture and denigrated the religion!

The notion of “discrimination” against the particular community or particular religion is in factcreated in the newsrooms. The idea of “intolerance”, which was coined by those people to attack the majority, has just vanished into thin air when the same term was applied otherwise!

nationalism
Each anti-nationalist “scream” by these elements never get wasted. It is effectively used to degrade the nation, demean the culture and denigrated the religion!

              My serious questions —  “has India practically failed to treat its country’s citizens lovingly? Has India ever discriminated its citizens on the basis of religions and languages?” Absolutely not. Here in India the minorities are provided especial facilities, they are well caressed and insanely pampered than the majority.

                       But still, the elite intellectuals and media houses blame the government or certain parties and organizations, and deliberately “ferment the anti-nation” feelings. Bhakt, Sangi are overused terms to belittle any persons who show love towards the nation. Who knows, after few years from now, it will be considered as a crime to praise the country and its culture. Please watch out, enough is enough! India should not faff about any longer. Rather, it should find ways to come down heavily upon such dangerous forces. Bluntly speaking, India should hold down and deal appropriately those subversive forces with equal seriousness and urgency!

media
The TV channels round the clock struggle to broadcast almost every inch of the army’s movement.

Well, the recent three successful strikes by India on 26th February should not be a case of joy either. Because today’s joy could bring a load of sorrows tomorrow! What is most important is the “silent preparedness” for the battles. It can only ensure an easy victory.  The noises only contribute to shaking the firmness and determination of our military forces.

Also Read:  Cloak And Dagger: Indo-Bangla Ties

                 Is it not too childish that we get prior information as to the plans and modus operandi of our fighters onWhatsApp and Facebook these days? I think it is too disgusting; it is ludicrous! The TV channels round the clock struggle to broadcast almost every inch of the army’s movement. Why are the sensitive action plans discussed to the bone in the newsrooms? A bigger mission should be executed under the cover of privacy. Please kindly note we have an equal number of enemies within the country.  Those within the countries may be passionately working to weaken India and its ethos rather than making it stronger. The road to victory must be undisclosed.  More so, when our enemies within the country are more insidious, more intelligent, more brutal and more warlike.

Salil Gewali is a well-known writer and author of ‘Great minds on India’. Twitter: @SGewali.

Next Story

U.S. Media Industry Going Through A Bad Phase

On the surface, it may look as though the average U.S. media consumer is awash in choices: websites, podcasts, cable and broadcast TV, satellite, but this is not the reality

0
US, Media, News, Downfall, State
Some front pages and section fronts of the Orange County Register are seen in the newsroom in Santa Ana, Calif., Dec. 27, 2012. VOA

On the surface, it may look as though the average U.S. media consumer is awash in choices: websites, podcasts, cable and broadcast TV, satellite and over-the-air radio, and yes, even printed newspapers. But the reality is different.

There is an oft-quoted line from Thomas Jefferson about the importance of a free press to the stability of the newly formed United States: “Were it left to me to decide whether we should have a government without newspapers or newspapers without a government,” he wrote to a colleague, “I should not hesitate a moment to prefer the latter.”

Almost always, though, the words Jefferson wrote next are forgotten. He added, “But I should mean that every man should receive those papers & be capable of reading them.”

His insight was that a press free from government interference is a necessary condition for a healthy democracy, but not a sufficient one. A free press isn’t very useful if nobody has access to relevant reporting on the issues that affect them.

If Jefferson were able to look at the media landscape in his country today, particularly at the local level, he would almost certainly be worried.

Consolidation

News sources, particularly local ones, are increasingly controlled by a limited number of companies that have bought up smaller news organizations and consolidated them.

This is perhaps most visible in the world of newspapers. Twenty percent of the newspapers that were active 15 years ago have been shut down, according to the University of North Carolina, leaving hundreds of locales without a local paper.

US, Media, News, Downfall, State
A specialist works at the post that handles Gannett on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, Aug. 5, 2014. VOA

Employment in newspaper newsrooms has fallen by 47% since 2004, according to the Pew Research Center. Meanwhile, companies like GateHouse Media and Gannett  control hundreds of publications using centralized news gathering that decreases the focus on their communities.

In August, the two companies announced a plan to merge, a deal that would create a company controlling more than 250 daily newspapers, as well as hundreds more weeklies and community papers. The merged companies would be several times larger than the next biggest newspaper company, Digital First Media, which in 2018 owned 51 daily papers and 158 other publications.

Digital First, which is owned by the hedge fund Alden Global Capital, has been at the forefront of another troubling trend: buying up newspapers, laying off newsroom staff, and liquidating the papers’ real estate assets.

Digital First, which also goes by MediaNews Group, or MNG, did not respond to a request for comment from VOA. However, in response to a Washington Post story earlier this year, the company said “MNG is committed to the newspaper business and a long-term investor in the space. MNG’s focus is on getting publications to a place where they can operate profitably and sustainably and continue to serve their communities.”

Job cuts, quick profits

“They’re owned, essentially, by private equity companies, or even hedge funds at times, and they don’t particularly care about the quality of the journalism,” said Margaret Sullivan, media columnist for The Washington Post and former public editor of The New York Times.

US, Media, News, Downfall, State
Two New York Daily News employees leave the newspaper’s office after they were laid off, in New York, July 23, 2018. VOA

“What they’re there to do is to strip mine these properties and get as much profit from them as they can in the short term. And that is very bad for journalism. It’s very bad for journalists, because it often means round after round of job reductions, cutting costs in really draconian ways that hurt the news gathering process.”

Newspapers are not typically seen as a major profit-making venture. While they generate significant cash flow through advertising sales, that is offset by high production costs of personnel and the logistics of printing and delivery. Many are run by family foundations and other organizations that place some value on their public mission.

The strategy of many investment firms buying up newspaper chains has been to increase profits by slashing personnel costs.

In the broadcast world, the story is similar. Large companies have been buying up local stations and cutting costs by centralizing the production of much of the content they air. Most notorious among them is Sinclair Broadcast Group, which owns 193 stations across the country, reaching up to 40% of the U.S. population.

Sinclair is known for enforcing a sharply conservative political slant on its broadcasts, providing “must-run” content that appears on every station the company owns. It regularly requires its stations to air commentary by Boris Epshteyn, a friend of President Donald Trump’s family and a former political consultant to the president.

Last year, a video went viral in which dozens of Sinclair anchors could be seen repeating, verbatim, a script that echoed Trump’s complaints about “fake news.”

Easing antitrust

Rules that formerly limited the ability of individual companies to own a dominant share of the media outlets in a specific market have been slowly eased over the years. Then, in 2017, the Federal Communications Commission gutted many of the remaining restrictions, opening the door to single companies dominating individual markets in both broadcast and print.

US, Media, News, Downfall, State
Hundreds of old newspaper vending machines are shown in a vacant lot near the former offices of the Alaska Dispatch News in Anchorage, Alaska, Sept. 11, 2017. VOA

The resulting consolidation has been “disastrous for local communities,” said Craig Aaron, president and CEO of Free Press, an organization that advocates for the decentralization of media. “We’ve gone from a more diverse localized media system to one increasingly controlled by a small handful of companies.”

 

“You used to get in your car in New York and drive to, I don’t know, Phoenix,” said Aaron. “Everywhere along the way, you would get incredibly different local voices, local flavors, local music. Now, you’re much more likely to get the same hit songs and Rush Limbaugh. So, we’ve lost some of that, you know, which I think has huge cultural value.”

The impact goes beyond culture, though, as Aaron and others have pointed out. It also has a direct impact on how Americans govern themselves.

“When sources of local and regional news dry up or go away,” Sullivan said, “there’s research that shows that the way people engage politically changes. They are going to be less likely to vote, they become more polarized, because for many years, the local newspaper might have been a way that people in that community were sharing a set of facts. Now, that’s gone or diminished.”

Last year, the Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics, and Public Policy at Harvard Universityassembled a list of academic studies that tied the loss of local news sources to a decline in both the quantity and quality of citizens’ civic engagement.

Social media news

To fill the gap, Sullivan said, people turn to less objective sources of news, like Facebook, or politically partisan cable television programming.

US, Media, News, Downfall, State
An iPhone displays the app for Facebook in New Orleans, Aug. 11, 2019. VOA

“It is really a very damaging thing for the way we talk to each other, the way we feel as a community and the way we deal with politics,” Sullivan said.

Identifying the disease and cataloging the symptoms is one thing. But finding a cure that will return the U.S. to a more Jeffersonian media model won’t be easy.

Sullivan argued that the growth of nonprofit news organizations is a hopeful sign that an alternative to corporatized media may be available. Groups such as Report for America provide funding so that young journalists can work in local media outlets, providing them important training while supplementing understaffed news outlets.

Some nonprofit publications like The Texas Tribune and Voice of San Diego have been able to make important contributions to their communities.

ALSO READ: ‘Safarnama’ App to “Capture the Way History in Delhi Actually Held within and under Stones” in Short Bursts

But nonprofits can’t bridge the gap entirely, and Sullivan and others worry that the advertising-dependent business model of traditional journalism — particularly newspapers — has been so thoroughly broken by the rise of digital media that trying to rebuild it on the same design will be impossible.

That’s why Aaron and his organization want the federal government to get involved. Free Press argues for a return to tighter federal restrictions on media consolidation, including the breakup of existing conglomerates. They also call for federal investment through grants or tax incentives to support local news.

“If local journalism is important to making sure democracy survives, then we need the policies to actually match that need,” he said. “And right now, we don’t have them.” (VOA)