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India to miss target for universal upper-secondary education by 50 Years

India will not have a universal upper secondary education till 2085 and that's over half a century late, read to know why

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Children in India. Source: Pixabay
  • An increase in single-sex toilets in schools has led to an increase in the enrolment of adolescent girls and female teachers
  • However, as many as 25 percent teachers in primary schools remain absent from work, and only 50 percent of those at school are actually engaged in teaching activities
  • A major problem that is preventing stunting is the lack of global and local funding

New Delhi, Sept 15, 2016: India will not have a universal upper secondary education (covering the age group 14-17 years and 9th to 12th standard) till 2085, over half a century late, according to the Global Education Monitoring Report 2016 by UNESCO.

This has to be viewed against the recent improvements in education in India, most notably that there has been an overall increase in gross enrolment ratio (GER, or student enrollment as a proportion of the corresponding eligible age group in a given year) at almost every level of education as of 2013-14.

Gender disparity in schooling has been largely addressed, and the enrolment of girls in higher education increased from 39 percent in 2007 to 46 percent in 2014.

An increase in single-sex toilets in schools has led to an increase in the enrolment of adolescent girls and female teachers, the Unesco study shows.

However, there is still a large disparity in the achievement of basic skills, such as reading and math, where there has been a decline in learning outcomes, as highlighted in the Unesco report.

Absenteeism among teachers remains a problem. As many as 25 percent teachers in primary schools remain absent from work, and only 50 percent of those at school are actually engaged in teaching activities, a 2004 World Bank report suggested. Almost 24 per cent teachers were absent during random visits to rural schools, according to a September 2015 study by the University of California.

The government has not established any bonus to incentivise teachers and principals, the Minister of Human Resource Development informed the Lok Sabha in April 2016.

E-pathshala, launched in 2015 and aimed at promoting e-learning through e-resources like textbooks, audio and video material, was among the steps taken to tackle the shortage of good teachers, the minister said.

Stunting too is a problem. As many as 39 percent, or 61.8 million, Indian children who are five or younger are stunted, as IndiaSpend reported in July. This is 15 percent higher than the global average.

In terms of educational achievement, studies show that stunting at age two leads to children completing one year less of school. Those stunted before age five achieve less schooling and lower test performances.

Another sustainable development goal that India will miss is to have only 100 million children stunted in 2025.

The current trends suggest that there will be 127 million children stunted in that year. A major problem that is preventing stunting is the lack of global and local funding, as IndiaSpend reported earlier. (IANS)

 

  • Manthra koliyer

    More attention should be paid towards education in our country.

  • Anubhuti Gupta

    In a country where millions go to sleep hungry in the night it isn’t that shocking that a secondary thing like universal education is half century away.

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India’s Lockdown Disrupts Functioning of Amazon and Flipkart

Amazon India Delivery and functioning of Essential Goods via. E-commerce companies Disrupted

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Virus Outbreak Amazon
India's coronavirus lockdown is disrupting e-commerce companies including Amazon and Flipkart. Pixabay

India’s coronavirus lockdown is disrupting e-commerce companies including Amazon and Flipkart, despite government assurances it would not, four sources familiar with the matter told Reuters.

Differing state and district level regulations relating to the 21-day lockdown, which began on Wednesday, are hindering operations, the sources said on Friday, with e-commerce firms finding it difficult to get curfew passes for delivery staff.

The disruptions highlight the difficulties of ensuring the supply of essential goods to 1.3 billion people during the shutdown in India, which has so far reported 724 cases of coronavirus and 17 deaths. Most of Amazon’s 60 plus fulfillment centers in India are shut and the U.S. company is in talks with state authorities to try to reopen them, three of the sources said. Industry executives say local authorities have not followed guidelines, stopping deliveries and warehouses from operating.

Virus Outbreak Amazon
A sign is lit on the facade of an Amazon fulfillment center. VOA

“It’s worse than one can think,” one source said, while a second added that only a “miniscule” number of Amazon warehouses were operating, citing this as a key reason for disruptions. Even when operations do begin to return to normal, it will only be in major cities, the second source added.

Amazon said in a statement that its top priority was to deliver the products which customers need the most and it was seeking urgent help from federal government and local authorities with detailed on-the-ground operating procedures. In New Delhi, Amazon’s Pantry service was suspended and the delivery slot for essential goods, such as oil and soaps, was shown as being April 26.

“There are clear guidelines provided by Government to enable essential services, and so we are working with the relevant authorities to ensure we are able to operate,” Amazon said on Twitter in response to questions from users in India.

Indian trade minister Piyush Goyal held a meeting with e-commerce executives on Thursday and said the government was “committed to ensuring that essential goods reach the people.”

Also Read- Effects of Quarantine on Mental Health and Relationships

Walmart-owned Flipkart has also been hit, with some grocery items which had been available earlier on Friday in New Delhi intermittently going out of stock. A source familiar with the situation said Flipkart was facing challenges with last-mile delivery of goods once they leave its warehouse due to restrictions on movement.

Flipkart said in a statement it had resumed grocery operations and there was a significant spike in orders. “We are enhancing capacity to meet the increase in customer requirements,” it said, adding it had received support from local and federal authorities.  (VOA)