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India to miss target for universal upper-secondary education by 50 Years

India will not have a universal upper secondary education till 2085 and that's over half a century late, read to know why

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Children in India. Source: Pixabay
  • An increase in single-sex toilets in schools has led to an increase in the enrolment of adolescent girls and female teachers
  • However, as many as 25 percent teachers in primary schools remain absent from work, and only 50 percent of those at school are actually engaged in teaching activities
  • A major problem that is preventing stunting is the lack of global and local funding

New Delhi, Sept 15, 2016: India will not have a universal upper secondary education (covering the age group 14-17 years and 9th to 12th standard) till 2085, over half a century late, according to the Global Education Monitoring Report 2016 by UNESCO.

This has to be viewed against the recent improvements in education in India, most notably that there has been an overall increase in gross enrolment ratio (GER, or student enrollment as a proportion of the corresponding eligible age group in a given year) at almost every level of education as of 2013-14.

Gender disparity in schooling has been largely addressed, and the enrolment of girls in higher education increased from 39 percent in 2007 to 46 percent in 2014.

An increase in single-sex toilets in schools has led to an increase in the enrolment of adolescent girls and female teachers, the Unesco study shows.

However, there is still a large disparity in the achievement of basic skills, such as reading and math, where there has been a decline in learning outcomes, as highlighted in the Unesco report.

Absenteeism among teachers remains a problem. As many as 25 percent teachers in primary schools remain absent from work, and only 50 percent of those at school are actually engaged in teaching activities, a 2004 World Bank report suggested. Almost 24 per cent teachers were absent during random visits to rural schools, according to a September 2015 study by the University of California.

The government has not established any bonus to incentivise teachers and principals, the Minister of Human Resource Development informed the Lok Sabha in April 2016.

E-pathshala, launched in 2015 and aimed at promoting e-learning through e-resources like textbooks, audio and video material, was among the steps taken to tackle the shortage of good teachers, the minister said.

Stunting too is a problem. As many as 39 percent, or 61.8 million, Indian children who are five or younger are stunted, as IndiaSpend reported in July. This is 15 percent higher than the global average.

In terms of educational achievement, studies show that stunting at age two leads to children completing one year less of school. Those stunted before age five achieve less schooling and lower test performances.

Another sustainable development goal that India will miss is to have only 100 million children stunted in 2025.

The current trends suggest that there will be 127 million children stunted in that year. A major problem that is preventing stunting is the lack of global and local funding, as IndiaSpend reported earlier. (IANS)

 

  • Manthra koliyer

    More attention should be paid towards education in our country.

  • Anubhuti Gupta

    In a country where millions go to sleep hungry in the night it isn’t that shocking that a secondary thing like universal education is half century away.

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Filmmaker Mahesh Bhatt Takes Pledge Not to Support Citizenship Amendment Act

The Bill, which has since become an Act, will provide Indian nationality to Hindus, Christians, Sikhs, Parsis, Jains and Buddhists fleeing persecution in Pakistan, Afghanistan and Bangladesh

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Mahesh Bhatt
After attending the press meet, Mahesh Bhatt on Sunday tweeted: We the people of India , having solemnly resolved to constitute India into a SOVEREIGN SOCIALIST SECULAR DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC.(At Ambedkar's abode. After reading the Preamble of our Constitution)". Wikimedia Commons

Filmmaker Mahesh Bhatt on Sunday took a pledge not to support the Citizenship Amendment Act (CAA).

He along with Congress leader Sanjay Jha joined a protest meet here. A video is doing the rounds on the Internet in which Bhatt is seen taking the pledge, perhaps a few days back.

“We believe Citizenship Amendment Bill is discriminatory and it violates the constitutional values. We don’t accept this bill and if it becomes a law we shall boycott its execution. We pledge not to submit any documents if asked to prove our citizenship,” he has said in the video.

After attending the press meet, Bhatt on Sunday tweeted: We the people of India , having solemnly resolved to constitute India into a SOVEREIGN SOCIALIST SECULAR DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC.(At Ambedkar’s abode. After reading the Preamble of our Constitution).”

Several parts of India have been witnessing violent protests ever since the Citizenship (Amendment) Bill was passed in Lok Sabha last week. The situation further escalated after the bill was cleared in Rajya Sabha.

The Bill, which has since become an Act, will provide Indian nationality to Hindus, Christians, Sikhs, Parsis, Jains and Buddhists fleeing persecution in Pakistan, Afghanistan and Bangladesh.

Mahesh Bhatt
Filmmaker Mahesh Bhatt on Sunday took a pledge not to support the Citizenship Amendment Act (CAA). Wikimedia Commons

The issue has caused widespread unprecedented violent protests in the northeast, especially in the states of Assam, Tripura and Meghalaya, with the agitating demonstrators demanding the withdrawal of the CAA claiming that the fresh legislation would jeopardize the demographic situations and life, culture and socio-economic positions to the 45.58 million populations of region.

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On Sunday afternoon, four buses were burnt in South Delhi as protesters clashed with police. (IANS)