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India to miss target for universal upper-secondary education by 50 Years

India will not have a universal upper secondary education till 2085 and that's over half a century late, read to know why

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Children in India. Source: Pixabay
  • An increase in single-sex toilets in schools has led to an increase in the enrolment of adolescent girls and female teachers
  • However, as many as 25 percent teachers in primary schools remain absent from work, and only 50 percent of those at school are actually engaged in teaching activities
  • A major problem that is preventing stunting is the lack of global and local funding

New Delhi, Sept 15, 2016: India will not have a universal upper secondary education (covering the age group 14-17 years and 9th to 12th standard) till 2085, over half a century late, according to the Global Education Monitoring Report 2016 by UNESCO.

This has to be viewed against the recent improvements in education in India, most notably that there has been an overall increase in gross enrolment ratio (GER, or student enrollment as a proportion of the corresponding eligible age group in a given year) at almost every level of education as of 2013-14.

Gender disparity in schooling has been largely addressed, and the enrolment of girls in higher education increased from 39 percent in 2007 to 46 percent in 2014.

An increase in single-sex toilets in schools has led to an increase in the enrolment of adolescent girls and female teachers, the Unesco study shows.

However, there is still a large disparity in the achievement of basic skills, such as reading and math, where there has been a decline in learning outcomes, as highlighted in the Unesco report.

Absenteeism among teachers remains a problem. As many as 25 percent teachers in primary schools remain absent from work, and only 50 percent of those at school are actually engaged in teaching activities, a 2004 World Bank report suggested. Almost 24 per cent teachers were absent during random visits to rural schools, according to a September 2015 study by the University of California.

The government has not established any bonus to incentivise teachers and principals, the Minister of Human Resource Development informed the Lok Sabha in April 2016.

E-pathshala, launched in 2015 and aimed at promoting e-learning through e-resources like textbooks, audio and video material, was among the steps taken to tackle the shortage of good teachers, the minister said.

Stunting too is a problem. As many as 39 percent, or 61.8 million, Indian children who are five or younger are stunted, as IndiaSpend reported in July. This is 15 percent higher than the global average.

In terms of educational achievement, studies show that stunting at age two leads to children completing one year less of school. Those stunted before age five achieve less schooling and lower test performances.

Another sustainable development goal that India will miss is to have only 100 million children stunted in 2025.

The current trends suggest that there will be 127 million children stunted in that year. A major problem that is preventing stunting is the lack of global and local funding, as IndiaSpend reported earlier. (IANS)

 

  • Manthra koliyer

    More attention should be paid towards education in our country.

  • Anubhuti Gupta

    In a country where millions go to sleep hungry in the night it isn’t that shocking that a secondary thing like universal education is half century away.

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Nokia Launches Nokia 3.2 in India

The smartphone is available in black and steel colour variants in top mobile retail outlets across India and on Nokia’s website from May 23

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Nokia has made several small to medium-sized acquisitions as part of a strategy to build up a standalone software business to deliver higher profit margins than its classic communications hardware products.
Headquarter of Nokia, wikimdedia commons

HMD Global, the house of Nokia phones, on Tuesday launched the Nokia 3.2 smartphone with a 6.26-inch HD+ display and about two-day battery life in India.

While the 2GB RAM+16GB internal storage variant of the phone is priced at Rs 8,990, the 3GB RAM+32GB storage variant would cost Rs 10,790.

“From biometric face unlock and AI-powered features like ‘Adaptive Battery’ to a more modern and personal way to interact with your smartphone through the dedicated Google Assistant button, you won’t be held back by the Nokia 3.2,” said Ajey Mehta, Vice President and Country Head-India, HMD Global.

Nokia
Representational image. (IANS)

The phone is powered by Qualcomm Snapdragon 429 chipset and runs Android 9 Pie.

The Nokia 3.2 will receive three years of monthly security patches and two major OS updates, as guaranteed in the Android One programme.

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The smartphone is available in black and steel colour variants in top mobile retail outlets across India and on Nokia’s website from May 23. (IANS)