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Indian-American Couple donates $100,000 to California University for Punjabi culture research in US

Dhillon, a prominent Riverside orthopedic and hand surgeon and has helped earlier as well to raise funds needed to launch the endowed chair in Sikh Studies in 2008

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Sikh community celebrating Vaishakhi. Wikimedia
  • An Indian-American couple made a large donation to a top American university
  • The endowment would help encourage a passionate graduate student to study the Sikh and Punjabi culture
  • The award will also help the world to know that the university recognizes and teaches diversity

August 20, 2016: A donation of USD 100,000 has been made by an Indian-American couple to a top American university to support graduate students who are studying Sikh and Punjabi culture there.

The endowment by Harkeerat and Deepta Dhillon, to University of California, Riverside, will help to attract graduate students with an interest in Sikh and Punjabi culture, and support fieldwork on Sikh communities in the United States, the university said in a statement.

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University of California, Riverside. Image source: www.ucr.edu
University of California, Riverside. Image source: www.ucr.edu

“This gift is a testament to their commitment to higher education, their passion for the arts and humanities, and their desire to expand the knowledge base about Sikh and Punjabi culture,” said Milagros Pe a, dean of the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences to IndiaPost.

The Harkeerat and Deepta Dhillon endowed Research Award for Sikh and Punjabi Studies in the Arts and Humanities, that will provide much-needed support for the dissertation research and writing on arts and humanities topics that relate to Sikh and Punjabi culture, said Professor Pashaura Singh and Jasbir Singh Saini, Chairman of Sikh and Punjabi Studies and chairman of the Department of Religious Studies.

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“We believe that establishing this award will enhance the belief that this is an educational institution that recognizes diversity and teaches diversity,” he said to India Post.

Dhillon, a prominent Riverside orthopedic and hand surgeon, has helped earlier as well to raise funds needed to launch the endowed chair in Sikh Studies in 2008.

– prepared by Karishma Vanjani of NewsGram. Twitter: @BladesnBoots

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US Researchers Redefine Conditions that Makes a Planet Habitable

The researchers also found that planets with thin ozone layers, which have otherwise habitable surface temperatures, receive dangerous levels of UV dosages

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Instruments, such as the Hubble Space Telescope and James Webb Space Telescope, have the capability to detect water vapor and ozone on a Planet. Pixabay

A team of US researchers has redefined the conditions that make a Planet habitable by taking the star’s radiation and the planet’s rotation rate into account – a discovery that will help astronomers narrow down the search around life-sustaining planets.

The research team is the first to combine 3D climate modeling with atmospheric chemistry to explore the habitability of planets around M dwarf stars, which comprise about 70 per cent of the total galactic population.

Among its findings, the Northwestern team, in collaboration with researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder, NASA’s Virtual Planet Laboratory and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, discovered that only planets orbiting active stars — those that emit a lot of ultraviolet (UV) radiation — lose significant water to vaporization.

Planets around inactive, or quiet, stars are more likely to maintain life-sustaining liquid water.

The researchers also found that planets with thin ozone layers, which have otherwise habitable surface temperatures, receive dangerous levels of UV dosages, making them hazardous for complex surface life.

“It’s only in recent years that we have had the modeling tools and observational technology to address this question,” said Northwestern’s Howard Chen, the study’s first author.

“Still, there are a lot of stars and planets out there, which means there are a lot of targets,” added Daniel Horton, senior author of the study. “Our study can help limit the number of places we have to point our telescopes”.

The research was published in the Astrophysical Journal.

Horton and Chen are looking beyond our solar system to pinpoint the habitable zones within M dwarf stellar systems.

M dwarf planets have emerged as frontrunners in the search for habitable planets.

Planet
A team of US researchers has redefined the conditions that make a Planet habitable by taking the star’s radiation and the planet’s rotation rate into account. Pixabay

They get their name from the small, cool, dim stars around which they orbit, called M dwarfs or “red dwarfs”.

By coupling 3D climate modeling with photochemistry and atmospheric chemistry, Horton and Chen constructed a more complete picture of how a star’s UV radiation interacts with gases, including water vapor and ozone, in the planet’s atmosphere.

Instruments, such as the Hubble Space Telescope and James Webb Space Telescope, have the capability to detect water vapor and ozone on exoplanets. They just need to know where to look.

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“‘Are we alone?’ is one of the biggest unanswered questions,” Chen said. “If we can predict which planets are most likely to host life, then we might get that much closer to answering it within our lifetimes.” (IANS)