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Indian-American NASA Scientist reveals new global climate data

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Washington:  An Indian-American scientist working with NASA has revealed how temperature and rainfall patterns may change through the year 2100 because of growing concentrations of greenhouse gases in the Earth’s atmosphere.

New high-resolution global climate data prepared by Ramakrishna Nemani, project scientist at the NASA Earth Exchange (NEX), a big-data research platform in California, can be viewed on a daily timescale at the scale of individual cities and towns.

It will help the scientists and planners in conducting climate risk assessments to understand local and global effects of hazards, such as severe drought, floods, heat waves, and losses in agriculture productivity better.

“This is a fundamental dataset for climate research and assessment with a wide range of applications,” Nemani said in a statement.

“NASA continues to produce valuable community-based data products on the NEX platform to promote scientific collaboration, knowledge sharing, and research and development,” Nemani added.

The data shows projected changes worldwide at a regional level, in response to different scenarios of increasing carbon dioxide simulated by 21 climate models.

“With this new global data-set, people around the world have a valuable new tool to use in planning how to cope with a warming planet,” noted Ellen Stofan, NASA chief scientist.

This NASA data-set integrates actual measurements from around the world with data from climate simulations.

These climate simulations used the best physical models of the climate system available, to provide forecasts of what the global climate might look like under different greenhouse gas emissions scenarios.

The NASA climate projections provide a detailed view of future temperature and precipitation patterns around the world at a 25-km resolution, covering the time period from 1950 to 2100.

The 11-terabyte data-set provides daily estimates of maximum and minimum temperatures and precipitation over the entire globe. (IANS)

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NASA’s Kepler Discovers Nearly 100 New Exoplanets

NASA researchers found that some of the signals were caused by multiple star systems or noise from the spacecraft

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UFO religion as a concept is now becoming a part of popular understanding.
Countless galaxies exist in the universe, each hiding secrets that humankind is yet to unearth. Pixabay
  • NASA’s Kepler has discovered nearly 100 new exoplanets
  • Some of the planets discovered are as large as Jupiter
  • NASA has also found planet which orbits very bright stars

An international team of scientists have confirmed the discovery of nearly 100 new exoplanets — planets located outside our solar system.

The discovery was based on data from the second mission of NASA’s Kepler Space Telescope or K2 released in 2014.

NASA has discovered nearly 100 exoplanets. Wikimedia Commons
NASA has discovered nearly 100 exoplanets. Wikimedia Commons

K2 searches for exoplanet transits by registering dips in light caused by the shadow of an exoplanet as it crosses in front of its host star.

NASA researchers found that some of the signals were caused by multiple star systems or noise from the spacecraft.

But they also detected planets that range from sub-Earth-sized to the size of Jupiter and larger.

Also Read: Milky Way’s neighbouring galaxy is of the same size, not bigger

One of the planets detected was orbiting a very bright star.

“We validated a planet on a 10-day orbit around a star called HD 212657, which is now the brightest star found by K2 missions to host a validated planet,” said lead author Andrew Mayo, a doctoral student at the National Space Institute (DTU Space) at the Technical University of Denmark.

Some of the planets found are as big as Jupiter. VOA
Some of the planets found are as big as Jupiter. VOA

For the study, appearing in the Astronomical Journal, the team started out analyzing 275 candidates of which 149 were validated as real exoplanets.

In turn 95 of these planets have proved to be new discoveries, Mayo said.

The Kepler spacecraft was first launched in 2009 to hunt for exoplanets in a single patch of sky, but in 2013 a mechanical failure crippled the telescope.

NASA has found many planets before as well. Wikimedia Commons
NASA has found many planets before as well. Wikimedia Commons

However, astronomers and engineers devised a way to repurpose and save the space telescope by changing its field of view periodically. This solution paved the way for the follow up K2 mission.

Adding the newly discovered exoplanets brings the total number of exoplanets by K2 mission to almost 300, the study said.

Also Read: NASA sounding rocket probing dark regions of space falter

The first planet orbiting a star similar to our own Sun was detected only in 1995. Today some 3,600 exoplanets have been found, ranging from rocky Earth-sized planets to large gas giants like Jupiter. IANS