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Indian-American NASA Scientist reveals new global climate data

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Washington:  An Indian-American scientist working with NASA has revealed how temperature and rainfall patterns may change through the year 2100 because of growing concentrations of greenhouse gases in the Earth’s atmosphere.

New high-resolution global climate data prepared by Ramakrishna Nemani, project scientist at the NASA Earth Exchange (NEX), a big-data research platform in California, can be viewed on a daily timescale at the scale of individual cities and towns.

It will help the scientists and planners in conducting climate risk assessments to understand local and global effects of hazards, such as severe drought, floods, heat waves, and losses in agriculture productivity better.

“This is a fundamental dataset for climate research and assessment with a wide range of applications,” Nemani said in a statement.

“NASA continues to produce valuable community-based data products on the NEX platform to promote scientific collaboration, knowledge sharing, and research and development,” Nemani added.

The data shows projected changes worldwide at a regional level, in response to different scenarios of increasing carbon dioxide simulated by 21 climate models.

“With this new global data-set, people around the world have a valuable new tool to use in planning how to cope with a warming planet,” noted Ellen Stofan, NASA chief scientist.

This NASA data-set integrates actual measurements from around the world with data from climate simulations.

These climate simulations used the best physical models of the climate system available, to provide forecasts of what the global climate might look like under different greenhouse gas emissions scenarios.

The NASA climate projections provide a detailed view of future temperature and precipitation patterns around the world at a 25-km resolution, covering the time period from 1950 to 2100.

The 11-terabyte data-set provides daily estimates of maximum and minimum temperatures and precipitation over the entire globe. (IANS)

Next Story

Australia Serious About Tackling Climate Change: Prime Minister Morrison

Pacific nations have debts of about $4 billion. Creditors include the World Bank and the Asian Development Bank, while $1 billion is owed to China.

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Australia, Climate
Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison is presented with a gift as he arrives in Port Vila, Vanuatu, Jan. 16, 2019. VOA

Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison has wrapped up a three-day trip to the South Pacific to reassure vulnerable island nations that Canberra is serious about tackling climate change.

Morrison told Pacific Island leaders that Australia would meet its international obligations to reduce carbon emissions in line with the Paris climate change agreement.

Many low-lying communities fear that rising sea levels will force them from their homes. In Samoa, coastal villages are already making plans to relocate to higher ground in the nation’s volcanic interior.

Morrison’s three-day trip to Vanuatu and Fiji has been described by foreign policy experts as mostly a success.

great barrier reef, Climate
A large piece of coral can be seen in the lagoon on Lady Elliot Island, on the Great Barrier Reef, northeast of Bundaberg town in Queensland, Australia. VOA

Coal a sticking point

But climate change remains a source of friction between Australia and its smaller neighbors. Fiji’s Prime Minister Frank Bainimarama criticized Canberra for not doing more to cut greenhouse gas emissions and reduce the economy’s reliance on coal. Australia has some of the world’s highest per capita rates of carbon pollution.

Australia is also eager to counter China’s growing strategic influence in the South Pacific, although Morrison insists all countries should work together.

“We are here because we are for the independent sovereignty and prosperity of Vanuatu because they are our Pacific neighbors and family. That is why we are here,” he said. “Our objectives and our motives here, I think, are very transparent to our family and friends here in the Pacific, particularly here in Vanuatu. This question is put to me all the time. I mean, we do not have to choose. We just have to work cooperatively together.”

Australia, Meat free,Hurricane, climate change, economic
Tire tracks left by a truck can be seen in a drought-stricken paddock on Kahmoo Station property, located on the outskirts of the southwestern Queensland town of Cunnamulla in outback Australia, Aug. 10, 2017. (VOA)

Australia has also mended a previously fraught relationship with Fiji. Prime Minister Bainimarama is a former commander of the Fijian military who deposed an elected government in 2006. Democracy was restored to Fiji, an archipelago of about 900,000 people, in 2014.

Also Read: Australia’s Maribyrnong Detention Center Gets Closed

Countering China

Pacific nations have debts of about $4 billion. Creditors include the World Bank and the Asian Development Bank, while $1 billion is owed to China.

Experts say that some South Pacific countries have preferred to take out loans from China rather than accept grants from Australia because the process was simpler and less bureaucratic. (VOA)