Monday February 26, 2018
Home India Indian Army v...

Indian Army vows to take Revenge on Mutilation of 2 Soldiers by Pakistan

0
//
128
Indian Army (representative image), Wikimedia
Republish
Reprint

Jammu, May 3, 2017: Last week on Monday at 8:30 am, two Indian soldiers along with their captain were killed after Pakistani terrorists attacked an army camp in Kupwara.

The soldiers who were killed, trapped and ambushed were Naib Subedar Paramjeet Singh, an army soldier, and Prem Sagar, a Border Security Force constable. Indian army’s Northern command reported that Pakistan used rockets and mortar bombs on 2 posts along Line of Control where these soldiers were patrolling.

NewsGram brings to you latest new stories in India.

“Pakistan fired unprovoked on two army posts in the Krishna Ghati sector in Poonch along the Line of Control,” said the army. Following Pakistan firing that killed 2 soldiers, India retaliated with heavy mortar firing immediately.

Pakistan mutilated 2 Indian soldiers along the Line of Control when they were patrolling.(Twitter)

Calling India’s allegation as “false”, Pakistan has denied violating ceasefire and disrespecting Indian army. After India vowed revenge for the mutilation of its two soldiers killed in firing along the LOC and promised to respond strongly as well as firmly.

Look for latest news from India in NewsGram.

According to NDTV report, Indian Union Minister Arun Jaitley has described the mutilation as “reprehensible and inhuman” calling them to be unfit even during wars. He further continued, “the incident is set to worsen ties between the two countries, which have been deeply strained after repeated ceasefire violations by Pakistan, the terror attacks in Jammu and Kashmir and the death sentence handed to Indian man Kulbhushan Jadhav, who was arrested in Pakistan last year.”

It is to be noted that last year in September, Indian soldiers have crossed the Line of Control late at night to attack staging areas for terrorists in Pakistan-Occupied Kashmir and returned home safely before dawn under the banner of “Surgical strike”. This action came 10 days after “Uri Pakistani attacks” which left 19 military personnel dead.

– prepared by Himanshi Goyal of Newsgram, Twitter: @himanshi1104

 

 

 

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2017 NewsGram

Next Story

Pakistan’s Court Summons TV Team for ‘Disrespecting’ Valentine’s Day Ban

On February 14, Geo TV’s popular Report Card show dedicated a 15-minute segment to discussing the justification of the court’s ban on Valentine’s Day coverage and celebrations

0
//
6
People buy flowers to celebrate Valentine's Day in Islamabad, Pakistan, Feb. 14, 2018. Pakistan's media regulatory authority, acting on a court order, has instructed all news channels, radio stations and print media to refrain from promoting Valentine's Day. VOA

A Pakistani court has summoned several TV reporters from the country’s largest private TV station over accusations of “ridiculing” last year’s ruling that barred Valentine’s Day celebrations and its media coverage across the country.

On February 14, Geo TV’s popular Report Card show dedicated a 15-minute segment to discussing the justification of the court’s ban on Valentine’s Day coverage and celebrations.

Two of the panelists in the show questioned the rationale for the ban.

Hasan Nisar, a prominent Lahore-based political analyst, declared the restrictions “illogical” and “ridiculous” for society.

“I do not even have anything to say on it, it’s funny,” Nisar said.

Echoing Nisar, Imtiaz Alam, a leading reporter and panelist of the show, said the restrictions were “useless.”

“How can the court interfere as it is against the fundamental rights of the people? Do we have Taliban regime in Pakistan?” Alam asked.

“This is a cultural martial law and curfew to enforce the extreme ideologies. This is a sick mindset, and the moral policing through PEMRA [Pakistan Electronic Media Authority] is shameless,” Alam said.

ALSO READ: 20 best valentine’s day gift ideas for him & her

Valentine's Day
People buy flowers to celebrate Valentine’s Day in Islamabad, Pakistan, Feb. 14, 2018. Pakistan’s media regulatory authority, acting on a court order, has instructed all news channels, radio stations and print media to refrain from promoting Valentine’s Day. VOA

Court order

Last year, on February 13, Islamabad’s High Court declared Valentine’s Day celebration un-Islamic and imposed a ban on any public or official celebrations.

The government reinstated the ban for a second consecutive year earlier this month to comply with the court’s ruling.

PEMRA also issued a fresh directive to remind its TV and radio licensees to refrain from promoting the day on their stations.

“Respondents are directed to ensure that nothing about the celebrations of Valentine’s Day and its promotion is spread on the electronic and print media,” PEMRA’s notification reads.

On charges of failing to adhere to the court’s order and PEMRA’s instruction, Islamabad court summoned the Geo TV host, two guests and the chief executive officer of the station to appear before the court next week and defend themselves in a contempt-of-court case.

“This act of the host and the participants apparently is tainted with malafide, ulterior motives, aims to undermine the authority of the court and to disrespect the order passed by the court, which clearly comes within the definition of the contempt of court,” the court said, according to local media.

The ban on Valentine’s Day celebrations and sensitivity toward it are not new in Pakistan. Some political and religious groups, such as Jamaat-i-Islami, have carried out rallies and protests against the celebration of the day, declaring it “unethical and un-Islamic.”

There have been instances in the past where local authorities prohibited the February 14 festivities in different cities across the nation.

In 2016, President Mamnoon Hussain also warned Pakistanis to stay away from celebrating Valentine’s Day, declaring it was “not a part of Muslim tradition, but of the West.”

ALSO READ: If You Are Going Single Into This Valentine’s Day Then These Tweets Will Lift Your Spirit

Valentine's Day
A couple buys flowers to celebrate Valentine’s Day, in Islamabad, Pakistan, Feb. 13, 2017. A Pakistani judge has banned Valentine’s Day celebrations in the country’s capital, saying they are against Islamic teachings. VOA

General debate

Valentine’s celebrations have increased in Pakistan over the last decade, particularly among the country’s youth.

The enforcement of the ban on its celebration and media coverage for a second consecutive year has sparked a larger debate among some of the country’s liberal and conservative circles.

A section of the society defends the celebrations and considers them harmless, though for others the day does not have any place in their religious practices or their traditions.

Pakistan, for the most part, is a conservative Muslim society. Public displays of affection are not the norm and often are viewed as unacceptable.

But some Pakistanis, like Saleema Hashmi, a Lahore-based artist, and renowned educator, believe the system is focusing on “irrelevant issues” at the expense of more important and pressing issues the country faces.

“Don’t our courts have better things to do instead of passing rulings on celebrating a mere romantic day?” she asked. “I do not understand how celebrating or denouncing Valentine’s Day can impact our religion, traditions, social or cultural norms.” (VOA)