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Indian Army’s website HACKED; provident fund and dearness allowance details may have been compromised

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

The Principal Comptroller of Defence Accounts (Officers) website of Indian Army has been hacked and sensitive information about defense personnel stolen, reported an English newspaper.

MoD and the Army are looking into the matter which is being kept low key to avoid panic among officials. Many fear that their provident fund or travel allowance/dearness allowance might have been stolen.

‘We have no clue what might have happened to our salary because we are not being able to access our salary slips. The hackers have hit where it hurts the officer corps the most,’ a Major General told to Times of India.

PCDA is the financial center of the army. Defense personnel access information about their salary, receipt of claims, proof of IT returns and PF withdrawals from the site.

Many officers feel that the authorities have shown a laid back attitude to the issue.

Initially the site could be accessed but there was an ad on the bottom. Later the site could not be accessed at all.

While the defense spokesperson denied having any knowledge about the hacking, PCDA spokesperson attributed the glitch to ‘modification of computer system’ and said the site will resume shortly.

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Airbus Defense Division Seeks New Partners to Expand in The Growing US Space Market

Airbus is ramping up production of more than 640 refrigerator-sized satellites for start-up telecoms services provider OneWeb

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Pop.Up Next, a prototype designed by Audi, Airbus and Italdesign is displayed at the Amsterdam Drone Week in Amsterdam, Netherlands, Tuesday, Nov. 27, 2018. VOA

Airbus’ defense division is looking for new partners to expand its presence in the growing U.S. space market, and could potentially build components for a lunar program there, Airbus Defense and Space Chief Executive Dirk Hoke told Reuters.

Airbus is ramping up production of more than 640 refrigerator-sized satellites for start-up telecoms services provider OneWeb at a facility in Florida, that Hoke said would already give it some leverage in the U.S. market.

The company could also produce components in the United States for its European Support Module, a critical part of NASA’s Orion spacecraft, if that is modified as a module to access the moon, Hoke told Reuters at the Paris Airshow.

“We’re also looking for new partners, with whom we could expand our footprint in the U.S.,” he said. “We have some very good products and systems so it’s worthwhile to look at what we can do beyond what we do currently in Europe.”

 

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Airbus’ defense division is looking for new partners to expand its presence in the growing U.S. space market. Pixabay

Airbus’s defense and space division has long hoped to expand operations in the U.S. market, but lost out to Boeing on a lucrative U.S. Air Force refueling plane contract in 2011.

The company, which builds satellites and works with France’s Safran to build rocket launchers, now hopes the projected “new space” economy, which experts say could be worth $1 trillion a year, could give it another shot at a bigger U.S. role.

Hoke faulted European leaders for failing to articulate a clear, unified vision for its ambitions in the space business, and said they were essentially ceding leadership to the United States and billionaire private investors, such as Elon Musk.

“This is more than just a billionaire’s race to Mars. It is about having sovereign access to space, having access to resources in the long term, and of course, unfortunately, it is also a question of defense.”

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Failing to take action and jump start new research and development program would leave Europe “in the second and third row position,” he said, noting that it would also cause a brain drain of top talent.

Rick Ambrose, head of U.S. arms maker Lockheed Martin’s space division, the lead contractor on the Orion spacecraft, told Reuters his company was in preliminary discussions with Airbus about possibly the adapting the European Support Module to bring humans to the moon and back to an orbiting lunar station.

Ambrose said no decisions had been made, but it was “a logical conclusion” that some of the items developed by Airbus for the Orion spacecraft could be used to achieve U.S. President Donald Trump’s goal of putting humans back on the Moon by 2024.

“Getting to the moon by 2024 means …. we’re going to have to reuse everything we can reuse,” he said at the air show. (VOA)