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Indian-born MIT researcher Dinesh Bharadia wins US award for his contribution to Radio Waves

Bharadia will receive the award at a ceremony in Mountain View, California, on November 2

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Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Wikimedia

Bengaluru, Sept 14, 2016: Indian-born researcher Dinesh Bharadia at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) has won the prestigious Young Scholar award of the US-based Marconi Society for his contribution to radio waves.

“Bharadia has been chosen for the 2016 Paul Baran Young Scholar Award for his contribution to send and receive radio (wireless) signals, including mobile telephony and data on the same channel (wave),” the Society said in a statement on Wednesday.

A doctorate from Stanford University and an alumnus of the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) at Kanpur in Uttar Pradesh, Bharadia, 28, hails from Ichalkarnji in Kolhapur district of Maharashtra.

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“Bharadia’s research disproved a long-held assumption that it is not possible for a radio to receive and transmit on the same frequency band because of the interference that results,” the statement said.

Named after Nobel laureate Guglielmo Marconi, who invented radio, and set up by his daughter Gioia Marconi Braga through an endowment in 1974, the Marconi Society awards annually outstanding individuals whose scope of work and influence emulate the principle of ‘creativity in service to humanity’ that inspired Marconi.

An equivalent of the Nobel Prize in science and technology domain, the Marconi young scholar award includes $4,000 (Rs 2,67,870) prize and expenses to attend its annual awards event.

Bharadia will receive the award at a ceremony in Mountain View, California, on November 2.

Bharadia’s duplex radio technology has the potential for multiple applications such as building novel wireless imaging that can enable driverless cars move in severe weather conditions and help blind people to navigate indoors.

“Marconi invented the radio but couldn’t solve the problem of duplexing. It’s fitting that this work is recognised by the Society,” said Bharadia in the statement.

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Bharadia’s work, which has direct connection to Marconi, culminated in making full-duplex radios a reality through self-interference cancellation technology.

Bharadia’s technology can be used in India to build relays which can listen to signals from a cellular tower, transmit them instantly and extend the range across the country.

“This (technology) is needed as we have only a few towers; by deploying simple relay, we don’t need to put in huge infrastructure for the cellular towers,” noted Bharadia.

The analogue cancellation filter Bharadia developed has unleashed huge potential for more applications. Its architecture allows cancellation in all environments.

“India has much denser users for cellular data connectivity and a few cellular towers. In other words, if I can talk and listen at the same time in context of wireless radio, then one can double the data we can service,” noted Bharadia.

According to his Stanford PhD guide Sachin Katti, Bharadia’s work enables a host of new applications, from low-power Internet of Things connectivity to motion tracking.

Academic advisors nominate young scholars and an international panel comprising engineers from universities and companies select the winners for the honour. Three other young scholars were selected this year.

The Society also honours distinguished scientists with the $100,000 Marconi Award and Fellowship for emulating the principle of creativity in service to humanity.

The two-decade-old organisation promotes awareness of key technologies and policy issues in telecom and internet domains. (IANS)

  • Ayushi Gaur

    Mr . dinesh has surely made India proud

  • Yokeshwari Manivel

    ya ! Mr.dinesh u are making the nation proud and also giving us the new idea of radio waves

  • Manthra koliyer

    This has added up to the pride of our nation.

Next Story

Astronomers Detect Mysterious Radio Wave Far Away From Milky Way

CHIME is composed of four, 100-meter long half-pipe cylinders of metal mesh, which reconstruct images of the sky by processing the radio signals recorded by more than a thousand antennas.

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Space, astronomers
Part of a 64-dish radio telescope system is seen during an official unveiling ceremony, July 13, 2018, in Carnarvon, South Africa. A Canadian radio telescope has detected repeating radio waves from deep space. VOA

Astronomers in Canada have detected a mysterious volley of radio waves from far outside our galaxy, according to two studies published Wednesday in Nature.

What corner of the universe these powerful waves come from and the forces that produced them remain unknown.

The so-called repeating fast radio bursts were identified during the trial run last summer of a built-for-purpose telescope running at only a fraction of its capacity.

Known by its acronym CHIME, the world’s most powerful radio telescope, spread across an area as big as a football pitch, is poised to detect many more of the enigmatic pulses now that it is fully operational.

“At the end of the year, we may have found 1,000 bursts,” said Deborah Good, a PhD student at the University of British Columbia and one of 50 scientists from five institutions involved in the research.

 

Saraswati, astronomers
Earth is part of the Milky way galaxy. Wikimed

 

High energy bursts

Fast radio bursts (FRBs) flash only for a micro-instant, but can emit as much energy as the sun does in 10,000 years.

Exactly what causes these high-energy surges of long waves at the far end of the electromagnetic spectrum remains the subject of intense debate.

More than 60 bursts have been cataloged since 2007, but only one other, observed in 2012 at the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico, was a repeater.

“FRBs, it seems, are likely generated in dense, turbulent regions of host galaxies,” Shriharsh Tendulkar, a corresponding author for both studies and an astronomer at McGill University, told AFP.

Cosmic convulsions created by the turbulent gas clouds that give rise to stars, or stellar explosions such a supernovae, are both possible incubators.

But consecutive radio bursts are a special case.

Space, Astronomers
The world’s largest single-dish radio telescope at the Arecibo Observatory in Arecibo, Puerto Rico, photographed July 13, 2016. Dwindling funds from the U.S. government and construction of bigger, more powerful telescopes are threatening this telescope’s future. VOA

No little green men

“The fact that the bursts are repeated rules out any cataclysmic models in which the source is destroyed while generating the burst,” Tendulkar added.

“An FRB emitted from a merger of two neutron stars, or a neutron star and a black hole, for example, cannot repeat.”

It is not yet clear whether the breeding grounds of repeating bursts are different from those that produce only a single radio pulse.

Significantly, the 2012 and 2018 “repeaters” have strikingly similar properties.

CHIME (Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment) also spotted a dozen single burst radio waves, but with an unusual profile.

Most FRBs spotted so far have wavelengths of a few centimeters, but these had intervals of nearly a meter, opening up a whole new line of inquiry for astronomers.

Could these enigmatic radio pulses point to intelligence elsewhere in the Universe? Might they be messages in a bottle?

SpaceX, Astronomers
The night sky is lit up above Vandenberg Air Force Base, California, during the launch of a SpaceX rocket carrying an Argentine Earth-observation satellite. VOA

“It is extremely, extremely unlikely,” Tendulkar said.

“As a scientist I can’t rule it out 100 percent. But intelligent life is not on the minds of any astronomer as a source of these FRBs.”

Constructed in British Columbia, CHIME is composed of four, 100-meter long half-pipe cylinders of metal mesh, which reconstruct images of the sky by processing the radio signals recorded by more than a thousand antennas.

Also Read: Astronauts Would Be Able to Grow Beans in Space in 2021: NASA

“This signal processing system is the largest of any telescope on Earth,” the researchers said in a communique.

The other institutions with leading roles are the University of Toronto, the National Research Council of Canada, and the Perimeter Institute. (VOA)