Sunday January 20, 2019

Indian culture attracts foreign students but traffic bothers them

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photo source :anirudhsuri.files.wordpress.com

Students from various foreign abodes are fascinated by India’s culture but are deathly afraid of its roads and the traffic it pertains . Ayah and Nasraa both from Bahrain felt that there is not much difference in the culture of Bahrain and India maybe because of the fact that Bahrain is flooded with Indians . “Though we don’t have any Indian friends, we know a lot about Indian culture. Indian food is amazing too,” they said . The students are currently participating in the ‘Global Village’ of the annual cultural festival ‘Vibgyor’ of Baba Farid Group of Institutions which began today (January 29,2016).
However they added that travelling in India is a daunting experience which they wish to avoid. “Vehicles come towards you from all directions and the condition of roads is really bad. Travelling is a scary experience. The roads and traffic management is much better in Bahrain,” the 18-years-olds stated .
Naweed Hamkar from Afghanistan was reportedly well versed in Hindi phrases . “Aapse mil key khushi hui,” and “Dhanyawad” were some phrases uttered by him frequently at the feast. When asked about his extensive knowledge in hindi he said “Bollywood films are a huge hit in Afghanistan. All cinema goers are crazy about Hindi films and that’s also how I learnt little Hindi.”.
Twenty six-year-old Mahmoud from Egypt also unveiled his knowledge of Hindi language. “At the Azhar University where I am working as a technical support hand, there are courses in Urdu and Hindi languages. I pursued the course for a while and now I am using what I learnt at the university,” he said .
Alice was so entranced by Indian culture that she got mehendi applied on both her hands when she reached Chandigarh . “I am going to spend five weeks in India as part of the project and have decided to get to learn as much as I can about the Indian culture. I loved henna designs when I saw these and got the same done on my hands as well,” said the 20-year-old from Taiwan .
On the first day there were only 10 interns from seven diverse countries namely Ukraine, Brazil, Taiwan, Bahrain, Egypt, Afghanistan and Indonesia . All of them were adept in their knowledge of India .

The article originally appeared in The Tribune.

Next Story

To Boost Revenues Zimbabwe Hikes Traffic Fines

The government says it is embarking on a program to create four-lane roads as the current infrastructure has become dangerous after years of neglect.

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Zimbabwe, traffic
Zimbabwe’s roads have become chaotic after years of neglect as motorists try to look for smoother venues for their vehicles, in Harare, Dec. 31, 2018. VOA

Motorists in Zimbabwe are ringing in the new year by toasting — or cursing — increased traffic fines which are expected to raise needed revenue by the cash-strapped government and reduce car accidents.

Come Jan. 1, if motorists break a traffic law, they will pay as much as $700 for offenses such as speeding, drinking and driving, overloading their vehicle, or driving without a license. The previous maximum penalty was just $30.

President Emmerson Mnangagwa’s government says the move, besides raising revenue, will reduce fatalities on the roads. But Stanford Chigwedere, a public transport driver, says he is against the idea because casualties on Zimbabwe’s roads are not caused by bad driving alone.

“Roads in Zimbabwe are now useless. They want to fine us; we pay tax but they are doing nothing,” Chigwedere said. “Now they are increasing fines to as much as $700, where will that money go to? All roads are full of potholes. We are giving them lots of money. We are not causing deaths or accidents on the roads; it is the police chasing motorists that cause accidents because we will be on these bad roads.”

Critics say the move is a desperate measure to squeeze money from an already overburdened citizenry.

Clever Mundau says he is for the new traffic fines being introduced by the government.

“I think the responsible authority have views, maybe they want the roads to be OK.” Mundau said. “So they are going to make sure that the roads are OK. So let’s just give them time.”

Zimbabwe, traffic
Obio Chinyere, managing director of the Traffic Safety Council of Zimbabwe, says major causes of road accidents include speeding and lack of discipline. VOA

According to the Traffic Safety Council of Zimbabwe, major causes of road accidents include speeding and lack of discipline. Obio Chinyere, the head of the government agency, says fines by themselves will not work.

“It is not only the fines when you look at the road safety, there are other instruments we can actually use, yes, the fines, but you also have to bring in education, road worthy vehicles,” Chinyere said. “We are saying; yes you can make an error as you drive, if you move out of the road, it shouldn’t be a death sentence, the road should be able to forgive you. Once you leave that road, you are gone.”

Also Read: Zimbabwe Government Aid in The Cholera Outbreak By Pledging Money

Narrow roads have also been an issue, causing some motorists to swerve and get into accidents.

The government says it is embarking on a program to create four-lane roads as the current infrastructure has become dangerous after years of neglect. (VOA)